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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
Lunchbox, Bryan Voltaggio's lunch-only restaurant, opened last Saturday in Frederick The Lunchbox menu is very simple -- seven pressed sandwiches (e.g., portabello, Reuben and peanut butter and banana); green salads; soups (e.g., alphabet, roasted butternut squash); and sweets (e.g., brownies and cookies). Nothing is more expensive than five dollars. The family-friendly restaurant also serves specialty-brand sodas like Boylan and McCutcheon and even flavored South Mountain Creamery milk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lefavor and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The new school year is underway, and many parents know what's ahead: the lunchbox grind. Peanut butter and jelly again? Yawn. "It seems like you either get stuck in a rut, or your kids get bored," says Paula LacKamp of Towson. "Then they don't eat their lunch, and they come home starving. " But with a little planning and some inspiration, creating healthy and fun lunches for kids doesn't have to be a major chore. LacKamp tries to make lunchtime more interesting for her daughter Hannah, 11, and son Nathaniel, 8, by doing things like switching out sandwich bread for alternatives such as tortillas, pita or crackers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
This December, Bryan Voltaggio will open a new lunch-only eatery in Frederick, five blocks from Volt, his flagship restaurant, Volt. Its name is Lunchbox. Located on Frederick's Carroll Creek Promenade, at 50 Carroll Creek Way, adjacent to the Frederick County Library, Lunchbox is intended as a "stop for parents to grab a nutritious lunch for the kids" and a place for Frederick's professionals to grab something on the go. Just last week Volt announced the elimination of its lunch service along with the expansion of its dinner service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | March 28, 2013
Back at Bikal after Tribal Council, everyone agrees they liked Matt and that it sucked to have to send him home. Michael is especially bereft, as Matt was his ally from the start. Luckily for him, Corinne loves the gays, and she's willing to get rid of someone from her alliance (namely, Phillip) in order to keep him. Phillip sees them talking, and, as a federal agent (sigh) he doesn't trust Corinne and wants her gone immediately. Cochran tries to talk him down using logic and solid game strategy, but it doesn't seem to have any affect.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | October 9, 1991
FEW PROBLEMS IN LIFE loom as large as a kid's empty lunchbox at 7 a.m. But you can't just throw in any old dusty sandwich and call the thing done.What if your son falls asleep in the middle of long division and then fails, somewhere down the road, to get into the right college? What if your daughter grows faint during kiddie gymnastics and misses out, thanks to you, on the 2004 Olympics?It's no exaggeration that a lot is riding on this lunch.According to a 1989 study, "The Relationship Between Nutrition and Learning," done by the Food Research and Action Center for the National Education Association: "Hunger probably has no permanent effects on the brain, but it does disrupt learning -- one developmental step is lost, and it is difficult to move on to the next one."
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2003
Be honest. When you were a kid and opened your lunchbox, didn't you dig down to the bottom right away to look for the cookie? I sure did. Now, I am the one packing the cookies in the lunchbox. I want to make my cookies exceptional ones that will guarantee that the dig to the bottom of the lunchbox or bag ends happily. That the cookies taste good should be a given, but I try to add something nutritious to the ingredients. "Try this; it is good for you" is a guaranteed "cookie stopper," if I ever heard one. Instead, I play it sneaky and do not mention the healthful part.
NEWS
By Jean E. Thompson | May 8, 2004
WHEN WE WERE YOUNG, the lunch hour echoed with the sounds of the steel-sided lunchbox, now glorified as a collectible in a new exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Encased there like artifacts or jewels are the barn-shaped working-class pail and the picture-stamped square school lunchboxes we remember. Some of these are in "mint condition" -- never dented, never lost and recovered, never used as a booster seat or crudded up with crumbs and curdled milk. Some sell for hundreds, even thousands of dollars.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2004
Back-to-school time is time to talk lunch. Not whatM-Fs in your childM-Fs lunch, but what his lunch is in. How the container defines its carrier. How the carrier can make the container more his M-y or hers. In the first decades of the 20th century, picking a lunchbox was easy; kids used whatever was available. Cast-off tobacco tins and biscuit containers worked fine. Then, in 1950, an Aladdin Industries executive in Nashville came up with the idea of putting cowboy movie hero Hopalong Cassidy on the side of a steel box. The humble lunch container had become a vessel of pop culture, with a host of celebrity faces and cartoon characters gracing boxes over the next few decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Frederick Restaurant Week runs March 4-10. The some two dozen restaurants participating in the seven-day promotion are offering two- or three-course dinners for $20.13 and $30.13, respectively. Most are also offering two- and three-course lunches for $15.13 and $20.13, respectively. At these prices you wouldn't expect Volt to be among the participants, and you'd be right. However, Bryan Voltaggio and Hilda Staples' two other Frederick restaurants, Lunchbox and Family Meal , are joining in. Other participating restaurants include Alexander's, Brewer's Alley, Firestone Culinary Tavern, Isabella's Taverna and Tapas Bar, The Orchard, Quinn's Attic and the Tasting Room.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
How many cars do you reckon pass each day through the intersection of Mountain Road and Belair Road in Fallston? Tony Ashe says about 85,000 cars, give or take a Buick, are swinging near the Mallet Restaurant and Crabhouse , his new multilevel, multipurpose establishment on this well-traveled stretch of Harford County. This crossroads has been home to a long succession of restaurants and roadhouses, most notably Pecora's , a nightclub that hosted acts like the Four Tops, Vic Damone and Frank Sinatra Jr. Its prime location is just one reason why Ashe, the head of an ownership consortium, is bullish on the Mallet's prospects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Frederick Restaurant Week runs March 4-10. The some two dozen restaurants participating in the seven-day promotion are offering two- or three-course dinners for $20.13 and $30.13, respectively. Most are also offering two- and three-course lunches for $15.13 and $20.13, respectively. At these prices you wouldn't expect Volt to be among the participants, and you'd be right. However, Bryan Voltaggio and Hilda Staples' two other Frederick restaurants, Lunchbox and Family Meal , are joining in. Other participating restaurants include Alexander's, Brewer's Alley, Firestone Culinary Tavern, Isabella's Taverna and Tapas Bar, The Orchard, Quinn's Attic and the Tasting Room.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Michael Voltaggio certainly knows his way around a kitchen but the idea of playing a chef on TV seems to be tilting his toque. The Maryland-born "Top Chef" winner has been on Twitter, talking about an upcoming cameo on the TV show"The Exes" where he promises to "be cooking up some comedy. " Voltaggio, who usually seems quite cool, even in the heat of the kitchen, says he's got the jitters about acting. "Is playing 'yourself' on TV considered acting? Somebody else does write what you say," he said on Twitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
Lunchbox, Bryan Voltaggio's lunch-only restaurant, opened last Saturday in Frederick The Lunchbox menu is very simple -- seven pressed sandwiches (e.g., portabello, Reuben and peanut butter and banana); green salads; soups (e.g., alphabet, roasted butternut squash); and sweets (e.g., brownies and cookies). Nothing is more expensive than five dollars. The family-friendly restaurant also serves specialty-brand sodas like Boylan and McCutcheon and even flavored South Mountain Creamery milk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
How many cars do you reckon pass each day through the intersection of Mountain Road and Belair Road in Fallston? Tony Ashe says about 85,000 cars, give or take a Buick, are swinging near the Mallet Restaurant and Crabhouse , his new multilevel, multipurpose establishment on this well-traveled stretch of Harford County. This crossroads has been home to a long succession of restaurants and roadhouses, most notably Pecora's , a nightclub that hosted acts like the Four Tops, Vic Damone and Frank Sinatra Jr. Its prime location is just one reason why Ashe, the head of an ownership consortium, is bullish on the Mallet's prospects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
This December, Bryan Voltaggio will open a new lunch-only eatery in Frederick, five blocks from Volt, his flagship restaurant, Volt. Its name is Lunchbox. Located on Frederick's Carroll Creek Promenade, at 50 Carroll Creek Way, adjacent to the Frederick County Library, Lunchbox is intended as a "stop for parents to grab a nutritious lunch for the kids" and a place for Frederick's professionals to grab something on the go. Just last week Volt announced the elimination of its lunch service along with the expansion of its dinner service.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2004
Back-to-school time is time to talk lunch. Not whatM-Fs in your childM-Fs lunch, but what his lunch is in. How the container defines its carrier. How the carrier can make the container more his M-y or hers. In the first decades of the 20th century, picking a lunchbox was easy; kids used whatever was available. Cast-off tobacco tins and biscuit containers worked fine. Then, in 1950, an Aladdin Industries executive in Nashville came up with the idea of putting cowboy movie hero Hopalong Cassidy on the side of a steel box. The humble lunch container had become a vessel of pop culture, with a host of celebrity faces and cartoon characters gracing boxes over the next few decades.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | October 9, 1991
The average child will need more than 1,700 lunches packed during the course of his education, according to Meredith Brokaw and Annie Gilbar, authors of "The Penny Whistle Lunchbox."To give you a little help with menu-planning, here are some recipes from two recently published cookbooks on lunchbox lunches.The first three come from "The Penny Whistle Lunchbox:"Tuna pasta salad Makes 4 to 6 servings*2 eggs, hard boiled and sliced1 cup steamed broccoli florets1 tomato, chopped2 cups cooked fusilli pasta1 cup tuna packed in water, drained1/2 red bell pepper, chopped1/2 cup steamed chopped green beans1/2 cup kidney beans (optional -- but nutritious)
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Michael Voltaggio certainly knows his way around a kitchen but the idea of playing a chef on TV seems to be tilting his toque. The Maryland-born "Top Chef" winner has been on Twitter, talking about an upcoming cameo on the TV show"The Exes" where he promises to "be cooking up some comedy. " Voltaggio, who usually seems quite cool, even in the heat of the kitchen, says he's got the jitters about acting. "Is playing 'yourself' on TV considered acting? Somebody else does write what you say," he said on Twitter.
NEWS
By Jean E. Thompson | May 8, 2004
WHEN WE WERE YOUNG, the lunch hour echoed with the sounds of the steel-sided lunchbox, now glorified as a collectible in a new exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Encased there like artifacts or jewels are the barn-shaped working-class pail and the picture-stamped square school lunchboxes we remember. Some of these are in "mint condition" -- never dented, never lost and recovered, never used as a booster seat or crudded up with crumbs and curdled milk. Some sell for hundreds, even thousands of dollars.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2003
Be honest. When you were a kid and opened your lunchbox, didn't you dig down to the bottom right away to look for the cookie? I sure did. Now, I am the one packing the cookies in the lunchbox. I want to make my cookies exceptional ones that will guarantee that the dig to the bottom of the lunchbox or bag ends happily. That the cookies taste good should be a given, but I try to add something nutritious to the ingredients. "Try this; it is good for you" is a guaranteed "cookie stopper," if I ever heard one. Instead, I play it sneaky and do not mention the healthful part.
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