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NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 18, 2003
I take lunch to work every day. I usually pack a deli-style sandwich, chips, a piece of fruit and something sweet. I feel as though I get a good mix of food groups, but I'm worried that I get too much salt and fat with the lunch meat, chips and cookies. Am I? While you've struck a good nutritional balance overall, cutting back on the salt and fat isn't a bad idea. With a few minor changes you can turn your "almost there" fare into a lunch that tastes good and keeps you energized through dinnertime.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lefavor and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The new school year is underway, and many parents know what's ahead: the lunchbox grind. Peanut butter and jelly again? Yawn. "It seems like you either get stuck in a rut, or your kids get bored," says Paula LacKamp of Towson. "Then they don't eat their lunch, and they come home starving. " But with a little planning and some inspiration, creating healthy and fun lunches for kids doesn't have to be a major chore. LacKamp tries to make lunchtime more interesting for her daughter Hannah, 11, and son Nathaniel, 8, by doing things like switching out sandwich bread for alternatives such as tortillas, pita or crackers.
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NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | June 10, 1993
Westminster police were a little suspicious when they foun four people stuffing coins from a parking meter into a brand new soccer sock Sunday.But when police released a 16-year-old allegedly involved in that caper to his parents, they noticed that the youth's father was wearing a new Adidas jacket similar to some recently stolen from a city soccer shop.So they got a search warrant.When the warrant was executed, new soccer clothing, a leather jacket and skirt ensemble, rolls, and 20 pounds of lunch meat -- all items similar to those stolen in recent Westminster-area burglaries -- were recovered, police said.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
For three decades he hid, fleeing charges that he killed a Baltimore Police Department employee who chased him down for stealing a can of food from a Christmas gift basket. He outlived seven witnesses. He kicked drugs and became a counselor for Boston's homeless. And yesterday, nearly a year after authorities caught up with him, Michael Hughes received a plea deal that, in the opinion of Baltimore Circuit Court Judge John M. Glynn, became a "clear case of justice delayed being justice denied."
NEWS
By C.W. GUSEWELLE | July 10, 1996
KANSAS CITY -- Spurred by reports that cardiac patients are dropping like flies while trying futilely to get to their nitroglycerine tablets, fresh thought has been given to the whole subject of child-proof packaging.I'm not sure the new guidelines have been announced, but it's likely they will require that containers should be openable by any reasonably competent adult chimpanzee.It is high time someone took a look at this problem.Just yesterday, I injured myself while trying to open a package of child-proof lunch meat.
FEATURES
By John Tanasychuk and John Tanasychuk,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 1, 1992
One of the most frequently asked questions home economists are asked is: "How long can I keep it?"The "it" can be anything from leftover turkey to bottled vanilla.Here's a partial list based on information provided by the Oakland County (Mich.) Cooperative Extension office.The cupboard:Store foods in a cool, dry cabinet, not above ranges or refrigerators where warm air can cause products to lose quality. Extended storage may cause flavors to fade and change and reduce nutrients. Always look for dates before using.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2004
Michael Hughes had been on the run for 30 years when a knife fight on a Boston bus put him behind bars. He might have made bail and slipped away, as Baltimore's longest-missing fugitive had done time and again since he was accused of killing a civilian Police Department employee in 1974. But even in jail, a place where nobody wants in, Hughes seemed especially desperate to get out. As soon as he was booked Sunday, Hughes used his one phone call to try to come up with $10,000 cash to quickly make bail.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 30, 1993
It's taken me nearly 43 years to learn how Baltimoreans occupy themselves during one of our fierce, 2-inch snow storms.They visit their dentist.Yes, instead of cleaning their sidewalks, they have their molars and bicuspids polished by their friendly dental professional."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | August 29, 1999
When I last wrote about the Crossroads, before the Cross Keys Inn became a Radisson, I said that the waiter got the food on the table quickly; but given what most of our meal tasted like, that could be considered a minus. Harsh, but true.Three years later the fact that the inn has now become part of a large chain didn't mean the kitchen was going to be any better. But, I figured, at least it would be different.Although a couple of million dollars was spent renovating the hotel when CapStar Hotel Co. took it over last year, the dining room looks much the same.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 20, 1996
Message from CompUSA, Glen Burnie, to Mr. Ed Bogdan, Linthicum: "Please give us a call about your computer repair." So what's Bogdan do? He calls. And he gets one of those automated switchboards with all the options, including one he didn't know about -- permanent hold.Bogdan waits on the line and waits on the line. He sets the phone down and takes a shower. He shampoos but, to save time, he doesn't condition. He comes out of the shower and checks the phone. He's still on hold. He can hear the recorded message.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2004
Michael Hughes had been on the run for 30 years when a knife fight on a Boston bus put him behind bars. He might have made bail and slipped away, as Baltimore's longest-missing fugitive had done time and again since he was accused of killing a civilian Police Department employee in 1974. But even in jail, a place where nobody wants in, Hughes seemed especially desperate to get out. As soon as he was booked Sunday, Hughes used his one phone call to try to come up with $10,000 cash to quickly make bail.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2003
McKinley Johnson Jr., a civilian Baltimore police employee, was assembling charity food baskets for the poor at a city tavern on Christmas Eve in 1974 when he noticed someone had stolen a can of lunch meat from one of the packages. The 40-year-old chased the thief outside and was shot after a brief confrontation, police say. The next day, hours before he died of his wounds, Johnson identified a man from a photo lineup - Michael Hughes, then a 27-year-old West Baltimore man with a record of shoplifting and drug arrests.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 18, 2003
I take lunch to work every day. I usually pack a deli-style sandwich, chips, a piece of fruit and something sweet. I feel as though I get a good mix of food groups, but I'm worried that I get too much salt and fat with the lunch meat, chips and cookies. Am I? While you've struck a good nutritional balance overall, cutting back on the salt and fat isn't a bad idea. With a few minor changes you can turn your "almost there" fare into a lunch that tastes good and keeps you energized through dinnertime.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | August 29, 1999
When I last wrote about the Crossroads, before the Cross Keys Inn became a Radisson, I said that the waiter got the food on the table quickly; but given what most of our meal tasted like, that could be considered a minus. Harsh, but true.Three years later the fact that the inn has now become part of a large chain didn't mean the kitchen was going to be any better. But, I figured, at least it would be different.Although a couple of million dollars was spent renovating the hotel when CapStar Hotel Co. took it over last year, the dining room looks much the same.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1999
Dietz & Watson Inc., the Philadelphia maker of delicatessen meat that acquired the former Parks Sausage Co. plant in Baltimore, will transfer its poultry operations to Baltimore and could employ as many as 150 by next summer, when the plant should be running at full speed, company officials said yesterday.Dietz & Watson's business growth "the past few years has been phenomenal," Louis Eni, the company's president, said during a visit to the plant yesterday.The 133,000-square-foot Parks plant is being refurbished to accommodate Dietz & Watson production lines.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 20, 1996
Message from CompUSA, Glen Burnie, to Mr. Ed Bogdan, Linthicum: "Please give us a call about your computer repair." So what's Bogdan do? He calls. And he gets one of those automated switchboards with all the options, including one he didn't know about -- permanent hold.Bogdan waits on the line and waits on the line. He sets the phone down and takes a shower. He shampoos but, to save time, he doesn't condition. He comes out of the shower and checks the phone. He's still on hold. He can hear the recorded message.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2003
McKinley Johnson Jr., a civilian Baltimore police employee, was assembling charity food baskets for the poor at a city tavern on Christmas Eve in 1974 when he noticed someone had stolen a can of lunch meat from one of the packages. The 40-year-old chased the thief outside and was shot after a brief confrontation, police say. The next day, hours before he died of his wounds, Johnson identified a man from a photo lineup - Michael Hughes, then a 27-year-old West Baltimore man with a record of shoplifting and drug arrests.
FEATURES
By Rosemary Knower | October 31, 1990
I won't say that everybody has a Spam story, but many people do. Mine begins once upon a time in Baltimore, when four friends lived at the top of Wickham Road, just near a big, jungly forest of tall trees. Now, the four friends had been told by their mothers not to go into the forest, but they kept looking longingly at the green and secret depths, so close to their red brick row houses."You'll get ticks," said their mothers. "You'll fall and get hurt. You'll get lost. You'll get dirty!"One fateful Saturday afternoon, the four had, as usual, blown their allowances in Irvington on a movie (25 cents)
NEWS
By C.W. GUSEWELLE | July 10, 1996
KANSAS CITY -- Spurred by reports that cardiac patients are dropping like flies while trying futilely to get to their nitroglycerine tablets, fresh thought has been given to the whole subject of child-proof packaging.I'm not sure the new guidelines have been announced, but it's likely they will require that containers should be openable by any reasonably competent adult chimpanzee.It is high time someone took a look at this problem.Just yesterday, I injured myself while trying to open a package of child-proof lunch meat.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 30, 1993
It's taken me nearly 43 years to learn how Baltimoreans occupy themselves during one of our fierce, 2-inch snow storms.They visit their dentist.Yes, instead of cleaning their sidewalks, they have their molars and bicuspids polished by their friendly dental professional."
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