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by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
After 120 years of continuous operation, Fields of Pikesville has closed. The last day of operation was Saturday. Although Fields has had a long stretch of struggling on Pikesville's main street, the store's general manager Jeffrey Levin said there was a drastic drop in business in recent months. Even though the pharmacy stopped operating in 1998, the establishment was still called Fields Pharmacy by its loyal clientele, who continued to gather at its well-known lunch counter, enjoying club sandwiches, grilled cheese sandwiches and chocolate snowballs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
After 120 years of continuous operation, Fields of Pikesville has closed. The last day of operation was Saturday. Although Fields has had a long stretch of struggling on Pikesville's main street, the store's general manager Jeffrey Levin said there was a drastic drop in business in recent months. Even though the pharmacy stopped operating in 1998, the establishment was still called Fields Pharmacy by its loyal clientele, who continued to gather at its well-known lunch counter, enjoying club sandwiches, grilled cheese sandwiches and chocolate snowballs.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 20, 2007
I can see the vinyl disc spinning on the turntable at the old Hochschild Kohn music department. The song was "Chanson d'Amour" as sung by Dotty Todd and her husband, Art, the man whose obituary ran this week (he was 93). His musical career began on Kentucky Avenue in Northeast Baltimore, and he credited his mother - and her piano training - for sending him on to a career in music. Like so many, I also grew up with a piano, in our case an upright Charles M.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
After 120 years of continuous operation, Fields of Pikesville is closing. “It's true,” said Fields co-owner and general manager Jeffrey Levin, whose pharmacist father Norman bought the store from the Fields family in 1946. Levin said that the store and its lunch counter, a longtime gathering spot for Pikesville residents, will close around Labor Day, or as soon as inventory is sold off. Still know as Fields Pharmacy by the locals, the pharmacy stopped operating in 1998, according to Levin.
FEATURES
February 1, 2008
Feb. 1 1920 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police came into existence. 1960 Four black college students began a sit-in at a lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C., where they had been refused service.
FEATURES
June 5, 1991
It's early into June and already we've had a holiday weekend and a heat wave. Already hundreds of sunglasses have been lost at the beach, left on a lunch counter and crushed on the car seat. If you're shopping for shades, there are qualities to look for before making a fashion investment. See the sunglasses story on Page D4.
NEWS
June 26, 2006
Margaret Rohe, who owned a popular luncheonette on Belair Road for two decades starting in the 1950s, died of stroke complications Friday at a rehabilitation center in Baltimore County. She was 83. Mrs. Rohe, who most recently lived in Essex, opened the Marlin Restaurant in the 5100 block of Belair Road with her husband in the mid-1950s and for years worked beside him at the lunch counter. Margaret Anna Deckelman was born in the Gardenville area of Northeast Baltimore and lived there most of her life, her family said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
After 120 years of continuous operation, Fields of Pikesville is closing. “It's true,” said Fields co-owner and general manager Jeffrey Levin, whose pharmacist father Norman bought the store from the Fields family in 1946. Levin said that the store and its lunch counter, a longtime gathering spot for Pikesville residents, will close around Labor Day, or as soon as inventory is sold off. Still know as Fields Pharmacy by the locals, the pharmacy stopped operating in 1998, according to Levin.
NEWS
July 15, 1999
Donald Engen,75, head of the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum, died Tuesday near Minden, Nev., when his glider broke apart and crashed. William Ivans, an internationally known pilot who was flying the motorized glider, was also killed. Mr. Engen, of Arlington, Va., had been director of the Air and Space Museum in Washington since 1996. He was administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration from 1984 to 1987, and earlier served for two years on the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
By John Majors | April 28, 2011
During this month's meeting of Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP), I was stunned by a question asked of me as a representative of Lexington Square Partners and The Dawson Company — the lead developer for the redevelopment of Baltimore's west side Superblock — about our $150 million plan for the area. "Do you consider this development to be selling out the black community?" As an African-American, I found that question — asked by a commissioner who is not part of the African-American community — to be ironic (and some might say offensive)
NEWS
November 25, 2011
The developers of the proposed Superblock on the west side of downtown have agreed not only to commemorate the 1955 sit-ins there that forced Baltimore's central shopping district to desegregate but also to retain two exterior walls of the old Read's building at Howard and Lexington streets where the protests occurred. Given how little of the original site remains, that is a reasonable compromise between the need to commemorate the past and build for the future. The project has been stalled for years by preservationists who oppose demolishing any of the area's historic architecture, and who invoke its civil rights legacy in their cause.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
While members of the public had much to say when plans were announced to raze Read's drugstore in Baltimore — the site of pioneering civil rights sit-ins by Morgan State students — few stepped forward Saturday to discuss ways to commemorate the protests after much of the building is torn down. A forum at Union Baptist Church to brainstorm for ideas drew just three city residents, one of whom berated the city-appointed committee in charge for failing to get the word out about the meeting.
NEWS
By John Majors | April 28, 2011
During this month's meeting of Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP), I was stunned by a question asked of me as a representative of Lexington Square Partners and The Dawson Company — the lead developer for the redevelopment of Baltimore's west side Superblock — about our $150 million plan for the area. "Do you consider this development to be selling out the black community?" As an African-American, I found that question — asked by a commissioner who is not part of the African-American community — to be ironic (and some might say offensive)
NEWS
March 15, 2011
It is commendable that preservationists and civil rights activists want to bring attention to the 1955 sit-ins at downtown Baltimore's Read's drugstore, which forced the integration of the chain's 37 lunch counters in the region. But the idea that the only way to do so is by preserving the entire building is misguided. The interior has been remodeled several times since then, the lunch counter is long gone, and after years of vacancy and neglect, the exterior is crumbling, and the interior is beyond dilapidated.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2011
At 46, developer Harold Dawson Jr. is young enough that sitting at a lunch counter was not a civil right that he had to fight for, but a battle already won by his parents' generation. But the developer, who is black, says the victory is why he needs to move forward with plans to rebuild the blighted block on downtown Baltimore's west side where one such lunch counter sit-in took place. Rather than destroying the legacy of the 1955 protest, as some have argued, Dawson says the project will honor it by bringing new life to the area.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 18, 2011
I've been delighted at the groundswell of sentiment to save the old Read's building at the corner of Howard and Lexington. It turns out its lunch counter made civil rights history when the owners of the store broke down the restaurant color barrier after Morgan State students staged a protest. I am not sure what's going to happen to adjoining Lexington Street businesses, which served Baltimore, black and white, as inexpensive shopping destinations. No matter what your pocketbook and budget, if you were shopping in downtown Baltimore in the 1950s, you ended up at this street.
NEWS
March 15, 2011
It is commendable that preservationists and civil rights activists want to bring attention to the 1955 sit-ins at downtown Baltimore's Read's drugstore, which forced the integration of the chain's 37 lunch counters in the region. But the idea that the only way to do so is by preserving the entire building is misguided. The interior has been remodeled several times since then, the lunch counter is long gone, and after years of vacancy and neglect, the exterior is crumbling, and the interior is beyond dilapidated.
NEWS
August 14, 2006
Rufus Harley, 70, who was billed as "the world's first jazz bagpiper" and emitted his haunting sounds alongside some of the greats of jazz, died of prostate cancer Aug. 1 in Philadelphia, his hometown. Although he fully acknowledged that "everybody thought I was crazy" when he turned to bagpipes in the early 1960s, he became a frequent sideman on records and in concerts with saxophonists like Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Dexter Gordon and Sonny Stitt, with the trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and with the flutist Herbie Mann.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 27, 2010
E vents that played out 50 years ago this spring in Baltimore signaled a civil rights victory. Our public schools had been successfully and peacefully desegregated a few years earlier, but that was public policy. Private business was another matter. Blacks could not be served at the lunch counters and tearooms of Baltimore's major department stores, but the pressure for change was clearly in the air that Easter season. Manuel Deese was then an 18-year-old freshman at what was then Morgan State Teachers College.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 5, 2008
I stood in my grandmother's room that April 1968 night. Its window looked directly east and southeast. It was two days after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination and Baltimore's riot spread out before our eyes. She and some of my brothers and sisters watched in horror as the distant buildings burned. My grandmother could identify the landmarks and called out when the old Stieff piano factory near Aiken Street erupted in violently shooting flames.
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