Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLunar
IN THE NEWS

Lunar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses are safe to watch with the naked eye. But clouds or other atmospheric conditions can get in the way of a dramatic view. Look to the western horizon starting at 6:25 a.m. for a chance to see the "blood moon" phenomenon that can occur during full lunar eclipses. Like with brilliant sunrises and sunsets, the reddish hue that the moon can take on depends on dust and other atmospheric conditions. Partial eclipse begins at 5:15 a.m., causing a dimming of one side of the moon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses are safe to watch with the naked eye. But clouds or other atmospheric conditions can get in the way of a dramatic view. Look to the western horizon starting at 6:25 a.m. for a chance to see the "blood moon" phenomenon that can occur during full lunar eclipses. Like with brilliant sunrises and sunsets, the reddish hue that the moon can take on depends on dust and other atmospheric conditions. Partial eclipse begins at 5:15 a.m., causing a dimming of one side of the moon.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur early Tuesday morning, darkening the full moon and possibly tinting it a reddish hue that causes some to call it a "Blood Moon". For nearly an hour and a half, the moon will be dimmed and possibly appearing a copper color because of sunlight bent by the atmosphere. The total eclipse begins around 3 a.m. and ends around 4:30 a.m., with the moon at its dimmest at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse will be visible across the Americas as well as throughout the Pacific.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur during the Full Hunter's Moon, creating a spectacle that may make the moon appear in a rusty hue early Wednesday morning. The moon will be full at 6:51 a.m. Wednesday, so it will be shining big and bright Tuesday night, though it won't be technically full yet. Just about half an hour before that, the peak of a lunar eclipse will begin. "Totality" of lunar eclipse starts at 6:25 a.m., falling just before sunrise on the East Coast. The moon will be passing within the Earth's shadow.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 14, 1994
HOUSTON -- When the last Apollo astronaut's memory has blurred, the only real evidence of humanity's first venture to another world will be a cache of gray rocks in a guarded vault that proves Earth and the moon, however distant, are one.Twenty-five years after the Apollo 11 astronauts returned to Earth with the first bag of moon rocks, 65 scientists around the world still are using NASA's unique collection of lunar samples to analyze the history of Earth's...
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1994
It was one of the most dramatic moments in the history of television, when Neil Armstrong stepped onto the surface of the moon, and the image was beamed to more than a billion viewers via a tiny camera built in Linthicum.And despite the 25 years that have passed today, Stanley Lebar, the 71-year-old Severna Park resident who headed a team of Westinghouse Electric Corp. engineers and technicians who developed the camera, remembers the excitement as if it were yesterday.Seeing an astronaut coming down the ladder from the lunar landing module "was overwhelming," he said.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 17, 2002
THE HOWARD Astronomical League of Central Maryland threw a lunar party - called "Moonstruck!" - Saturday at Glenwood Senior Center. Because of poor weather conditions, computers and slide shows replaced the planned telescopic lunar viewing stations. But HAL members were fully prepared, and the show went on without a hitch. Those who attended learned about moon craters, lunar mountains and "Tranquility Base," where American astronauts landed on the moon. Children could make their own craters by dropping a ball into a container of flour.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
Years before astronauts touch down on the moon again, a robotic rover, built in part by the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, will land there to scout the terrain. NASA yesterday chose Goddard and the Marshall Space Flight Center, in Huntsville, Ala., to lead the lander mission. It will cost between $400 million and $750 million, and could blast off as soon as 2010, NASA said. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, near Laurel, is also expected to get a portion of the work.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
The Orioles' youth movement has been slow to reach backup catcher Fernando Lunar. Lunar has made only five appearances this season - none in a starting capacity. That most likely will change tonight, however, when the Orioles conclude their latest series with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. Lunar is expected to be in the starting lineup for the first time this season. "I really want to get him at-bats and he'll probably play tomorrow," manager Mike Hargrove said. "He's probably our best catch-and-throw guy, as far as the strength of his arm and how he handles himself behind the plate.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
A Maryland astronomer working in a back yard near Mount Airy during last month's Leonid meteor shower has been credited with making the first confirmed pictures of meteors smashing into the moon.David Dunham of Greenbelt said a starlike flash on the videotape he shot Nov. 17 closely matches the time of a flash seen independently from Texas. Since then, his tape has confirmed five more impacts videotaped independently by Leonid-watchers in Texas, Mexico and Maryland."I think this is the nail in the coffin," said Dunham, a space mission designer at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
September's full moon arrives at 9:38 p.m. Monday , known as both the Corn and Harvest moon. American Indians named it the Corn moon for coinciding with the crop's harvest, whereas the Harvest moon can fall in September or October, depending on which full moon is closest to the autumnal equinox, Sept. 23 this year. It is the third of three consecutive "supermoons," as it coincides with lunar perigee, when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit. Such a coincidence can make the moon look larger and brighter than when full moons are closer to apogee, their furthest point from Earth, though it can be hard to tell with the naked eye. The celestial wonders don't stop there -- next month's full moon is not far from being considered a supermoon, and it coincides with a lunar eclipse that can give the moon a reddish hue, dubbed a "Blood Moon.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Rain, storms and clouds are forecast Monday night through Tuesday, likely blocking out any view of a full lunar eclipse -- sometimes known as a "Blood Moon" -- occurring early Tuesday morning. Clouds are forecast to move in Tuesday afternoon, with chances of showers starting late Monday night or early Tuesday morning. The eclipse will start about 2 a.m., reaching full eclipse from 3 a.m. to 4:25 a.m., with a peak at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse occurs when the full moon passes through Earth's shadow, opposite the sun, and the sun, moon and Earth happen to be on the same plane.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur early Tuesday morning, darkening the full moon and possibly tinting it a reddish hue that causes some to call it a "Blood Moon". For nearly an hour and a half, the moon will be dimmed and possibly appearing a copper color because of sunlight bent by the atmosphere. The total eclipse begins around 3 a.m. and ends around 4:30 a.m., with the moon at its dimmest at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse will be visible across the Americas as well as throughout the Pacific.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Skywatchers in Maryland and across the Northeast will get a glimpse of a partial lunar eclipse tonight as the Full Harvest Moon rises. It will be most visible at about 7:50 p.m., which is just 12 minutes after the moon reaches its "full" stage, at 7:38 p.m. The moon will actually spend about 4 hours partially behind the edge of Earth's shadow. To see the eclipse, you can look directly at the moon, unlike in a solar eclipse. But this one could be difficult to see because it's only a partial eclipse.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
Doesn't Congress have enough to do with problems in the United States than to worry about flags and golf balls on the moon ("Md. congresswoman proposes national Apollo park on the moon," July 10)? Are we going to install a camera on a satellite to watch this area so no one touches anything? If some other country does touch these artifacts, who's going to arrest them? We need to concentrate our resources on this planet rather than spending millions of dollars to protect golf balls, flags, and the lunar landing site.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORTS | June 13, 2013
Members of the Harford County Liquor Control Board enthusiastically approved an outdoor event liquor license for the Lunar Bay Festival coming June 29-30 at Steppingstone Museum near Havre de Grace. All three organizers of the music, art and food festival – Kelley Duncan, Genevieve Britton and Margie Coakley – appeared before the board at its meeting in Bel Air on Wednesday afternoon. The trio calls itself Ladies of Locust because they are neighbors on Locust Street in Havre de Grace.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2001
Leaving spring training, the Orioles' pecking order among catchers was pretty clear. Brook Fordyce would be the starter, the first time he could say that heading into a season. Greg Myers, the subject of trade speculation since touching down in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., remained the primary backup while still in uniform. Then came Fernando Lunar, an offensively challenged acquisition during last summer's roster purge, and utility player Mike Kinkade. Once Myers departed, Lunar would become Fordyce's caddy - his only chance to carry a club.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - There isn't much reason for Fernando Lunar to check the lineup card when entering the Orioles' clubhouse, unless overcome by idle curiosity or choosing to brush up on his reading. Chances are he'll be listed near the bottom, among the reserves. Sometimes, it's worth taking a glance. When manager Mike Hargrove broke out his 32nd different lineup in 35 games last night, Lunar was in it. It might have seemed insignificant at the time, but not after Lunar began an eighth-inning rally with a single and scored the go-ahead run in a 9-5 victory over the Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Tropicana Field, capping his most productive game as an Oriole.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
There is no Transit of Venus to be watched in 2013, or any major eclipses visible for long from Maryland, but local sky watchers say there is still plenty to look forward to seeing in the night sky. There could be a few opportunities to see rare objects like comets and asteroids, as well as good chances to see some of our closest neighbors in the solar system. One of those is Mercury, one of the most elusive of Earth's neighbors because it orbits so closely to the sun, making it rare to see on the nighttime horizon.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | July 9, 2011
In his 1959 novel "Goldfinger," Ian Fleming draws upon the peculiarities of Royal St. George's as a faintly disguised setting for a high-stakes golf match between James Bond and the diabolical Auric Goldfinger. British Open entrants, though, might be just as apt to guess the scene was part of "Moonraker. " "Lunar" is a popular word to describe the bumps and pockmarks that spatter the fairways on the southeast England linksland, frequently kicking an unsuspecting player's shot into waist-high heather — or worse.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.