Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLumumba
IN THE NEWS

Lumumba

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 27, 2001
Lumumba is a political tragedy - and shocker - of the first order. It portrays the first prime minister of the independent Congo with hair-raising briskness and compassion. Patrice Lumumba held office in 1960 for two months, then was kidnapped and assassinated. Director Raoul Peck and his star, Eriq Ebouaney, bring startling tenderness as well as strength to a man who lit up the international media before he was shot and his corpse incinerated. This movie is no reverential biopic. It says that history left Lumumba with little room for trial and error as he attempted to carve a new nation from the sprawling expanse of the Belgian Congo.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 15, 2007
FREDERICK PITTMAN also known as Frederick Pittman Johnson is survived by 2 daughters, Louise Jenkins and Winifred Johnson-Blagmond, 4 sons, Amili Lumumba, Locy Lumumba, Dennis Johnson, Mark Johnson, 6 grandchildren , 1 great-grand child and a host of other relatives and friends. A Memorial Service will be held 7p.m. on Friday Nov. 16, 2007 at Martin Luther King U.M. Church 5114 Windsor Mill Rd. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. Services were entrusted to WILLIAM C. BROWN COMM.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2001
It was the summer of 1960, a time of rebellion and chaos in Patrice Lumumba's African homeland. The flamboyant first prime minister of the Congo was heading to the United States to plead for help from a United Nations that he had previously denounced. But before he boarded the plane, he met with foreign journalists. A dispatch I wrote from Leopoldville, Congo, and carried in The Sun on July 23, 1960, offered this description of the ill-fated leader: "Chances are he will present to an American audience the picture of a moderate who is the much aggrieved victim of Belgian colonialism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 11, 2007
After becoming MTV darlings and hitting gold with their breakthrough album, last year's As Cruel As School Children, the guys of Gym Class Heroes wonder what they're going to do next. "We ask ourselves that all the time, `What will the next album be like?'" the pop band's lead guitarist, Disashi Lumumba-Kasongo, says. "I'm actually wanting to see how it comes out myself." The New York quartet - which also includes Travis McCoy on vocals, Matt McGinley on drums and Eric Roberts on bass - has been touring nonstop behind the latest album.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | August 5, 2001
IN THE darkness of the movie theater, a caravan of cars lumbers along a dirt road, headlights blinking in the twilight. Then a voice in French comes forth. "You never knew about that night in Katanga. No one was supposed to know." Thus starts director Raoul Peck's Lumumba, a 2000 biopic that's just been released in America. Peck hails from Haiti, and it's a blessing he did this film about the life of Patrice Lumumba - Pan-Africanist, freedom fighter and first prime minister of the Republic of the Congo.
NEWS
November 15, 2007
FREDERICK PITTMAN also known as Frederick Pittman Johnson is survived by 2 daughters, Louise Jenkins and Winifred Johnson-Blagmond, 4 sons, Amili Lumumba, Locy Lumumba, Dennis Johnson, Mark Johnson, 6 grandchildren , 1 great-grand child and a host of other relatives and friends. A Memorial Service will be held 7p.m. on Friday Nov. 16, 2007 at Martin Luther King U.M. Church 5114 Windsor Mill Rd. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. Services were entrusted to WILLIAM C. BROWN COMM.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
The menu at Halal Foods features goat, imported rose water, bean pies, curry chicken, omelets, and fish.But so far, it's been the nickel candy and bubble gum that have allowed Alibaba Lumumba to make ends meet at 1023 E. Lombard St."When we first opened up, we were just sitting here looking at each other. Nobody was coming in," said Mr. Lumumba. "The candy keeps a cash flow going."And it brings the future -- the children of the Flag House public housing projects -- in front of Mr. Lumumba and his ambitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 11, 2007
After becoming MTV darlings and hitting gold with their breakthrough album, last year's As Cruel As School Children, the guys of Gym Class Heroes wonder what they're going to do next. "We ask ourselves that all the time, `What will the next album be like?'" the pop band's lead guitarist, Disashi Lumumba-Kasongo, says. "I'm actually wanting to see how it comes out myself." The New York quartet - which also includes Travis McCoy on vocals, Matt McGinley on drums and Eric Roberts on bass - has been touring nonstop behind the latest album.
NEWS
By Jorge G. Casteneda | May 25, 1997
AFTER MORE than 30 years of bloody and corrupt rule, Zaire's Mobutu Sese Seko is out.The man who reached power in November 1965 - with the support and at the urging of the Belgian Union Miniere du Haut Katanga and of CIA station chief Lawrence Devlin - has relinquished power, bested by age, illness and a broad-based and overwhelming revolt that surged toward the capital, Kinshasa, from the east of the country.It is led by an old nemesis of Mobutu's: Laurent Kabila, who began his struggle against the Belgian- and U.S.-supported regimes in Leopoldville - as the capital was then called - even before Mobutu came to power.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | June 6, 2004
GIRLS PERFORMER OF THE YEAR Devon Williams Towson Catholic, freshman Williams' penchant for wowing track and field observers extended from her nationally-recognized indoor track season to this spring. Track & Field News' High School Women's Athlete of the Year for Indoor Track opened the outdoor season by scoring two victories at the Falcon Invitational - the 400 in 59.5 seconds and running a leg of the 1,600-relay squad that finished in 4 minutes, 22.5 seconds. At the Morgan State Invitational, Williams claimed the 1,600 in 5:08.
SPORTS
June 11, 2004
PERFORMER OF THE YEAR Lauren Centrowitz Broadneck In a world where very few things are constant, the senior proved that when it comes to running, she is about as consistent as consistent gets. The Sun's All-Metro Runner of the Year in cross country last fall and an All-Metro choice in indoor track this past winter, Centrowitz announced her presence on the national stage by finishing second in the 1,600-meter run at the Penn Relays in 4 minutes, 53.79 seconds. She was one of just five female athletes to break the 5-minute barrier in the event.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | June 6, 2004
GIRLS PERFORMER OF THE YEAR Devon Williams Towson Catholic, freshman Williams' penchant for wowing track and field observers extended from her nationally-recognized indoor track season to this spring. Track & Field News' High School Women's Athlete of the Year for Indoor Track opened the outdoor season by scoring two victories at the Falcon Invitational - the 400 in 59.5 seconds and running a leg of the 1,600-relay squad that finished in 4 minutes, 22.5 seconds. At the Morgan State Invitational, Williams claimed the 1,600 in 5:08.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | July 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration has taken a series of steps that will weaken the international coalition against terrorism, compromise the pursuit of arms control and encourage the use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). These steps have not been discussed with congressional committees or debated in the foreign policy community. Many of these moves have reversed major tenets of American foreign policy and have weakened our international security. President Bush used a commencement address at West Point to call for a policy of pre-emptive attack against states and terrorist groups trying to develop WMD. Mr. Bush's remarks produced an angry reaction in Europe, where opposition has been mounting to U.S. plans for a national missile defense, the withdrawal from the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM)
FEATURES
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2001
It was the summer of 1960, a time of rebellion and chaos in Patrice Lumumba's African homeland. The flamboyant first prime minister of the Congo was heading to the United States to plead for help from a United Nations that he had previously denounced. But before he boarded the plane, he met with foreign journalists. A dispatch I wrote from Leopoldville, Congo, and carried in The Sun on July 23, 1960, offered this description of the ill-fated leader: "Chances are he will present to an American audience the picture of a moderate who is the much aggrieved victim of Belgian colonialism.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | August 5, 2001
IN THE darkness of the movie theater, a caravan of cars lumbers along a dirt road, headlights blinking in the twilight. Then a voice in French comes forth. "You never knew about that night in Katanga. No one was supposed to know." Thus starts director Raoul Peck's Lumumba, a 2000 biopic that's just been released in America. Peck hails from Haiti, and it's a blessing he did this film about the life of Patrice Lumumba - Pan-Africanist, freedom fighter and first prime minister of the Republic of the Congo.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 27, 2001
Lumumba is a political tragedy - and shocker - of the first order. It portrays the first prime minister of the independent Congo with hair-raising briskness and compassion. Patrice Lumumba held office in 1960 for two months, then was kidnapped and assassinated. Director Raoul Peck and his star, Eriq Ebouaney, bring startling tenderness as well as strength to a man who lit up the international media before he was shot and his corpse incinerated. This movie is no reverential biopic. It says that history left Lumumba with little room for trial and error as he attempted to carve a new nation from the sprawling expanse of the Belgian Congo.
SPORTS
June 11, 2004
PERFORMER OF THE YEAR Lauren Centrowitz Broadneck In a world where very few things are constant, the senior proved that when it comes to running, she is about as consistent as consistent gets. The Sun's All-Metro Runner of the Year in cross country last fall and an All-Metro choice in indoor track this past winter, Centrowitz announced her presence on the national stage by finishing second in the 1,600-meter run at the Penn Relays in 4 minutes, 53.79 seconds. She was one of just five female athletes to break the 5-minute barrier in the event.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | July 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration has taken a series of steps that will weaken the international coalition against terrorism, compromise the pursuit of arms control and encourage the use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). These steps have not been discussed with congressional committees or debated in the foreign policy community. Many of these moves have reversed major tenets of American foreign policy and have weakened our international security. President Bush used a commencement address at West Point to call for a policy of pre-emptive attack against states and terrorist groups trying to develop WMD. Mr. Bush's remarks produced an angry reaction in Europe, where opposition has been mounting to U.S. plans for a national missile defense, the withdrawal from the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM)
NEWS
By Jorge G. Casteneda | May 25, 1997
AFTER MORE than 30 years of bloody and corrupt rule, Zaire's Mobutu Sese Seko is out.The man who reached power in November 1965 - with the support and at the urging of the Belgian Union Miniere du Haut Katanga and of CIA station chief Lawrence Devlin - has relinquished power, bested by age, illness and a broad-based and overwhelming revolt that surged toward the capital, Kinshasa, from the east of the country.It is led by an old nemesis of Mobutu's: Laurent Kabila, who began his struggle against the Belgian- and U.S.-supported regimes in Leopoldville - as the capital was then called - even before Mobutu came to power.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 5, 1995
MOSCOW -- In the old days, the typical student at Patrice Lumumba University would be a young African, someone who could hope to become his country's first native-born doctor or engineer after graduation. The new graduate would be expected to take communism home with him and preach of its glories. That communist dream is gone, but the university goes on, struggling to survive in free-market style.Patrice Lumumba University -- alma mater of the terrorist "Carlos" and of hundreds of men and women who are government officials throughout the Third World -- now is a cheap and not so choosy institution.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.