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By Linell Smith | October 20, 1992
For the first time, major health organizations have agreed upon standards clarifying which breast cancer patients should be offered the option of lumpectomy and radiation therapy as an alternative to removal of the breast, the American College of Radiology announced today.At least one-third of all breast cancer patients could be eligible for a lumpectomy -- removal of the primary breast tumor and adjacent breast tissue -- followed by about six weeks of radiation therapy instead of mastectomy, under the new guidelines.
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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
After years of controversy over the best way to treat small breast tumors, researchers have found that thousands of older women can forgo radiation treatments without hurting their survival chances. Two studies published today in the New England Journal of Medicine found that radiation provides no added benefit for women over 70 who receive lumpectomies and take the cancer-fighting drug tamoxifen. "It suggests that upfront radiation is not necessary and may in fact be overtreatment for many of the older women," said Dr. Jerome Yates, vice president for research at the American Cancer Society.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | June 22, 1993
Several major scientific articles have indicated that for women with early stage breast cancer, a lumpectomy with radiotherapy offers the same rate of survival as a mastectomy for the surgical treatment of breast cancer.It is surprising then that most American women with breast cancer still have mastectomies. The reasons for this are puzzling to scientists and are clearly complicated, but it points up the need to educate women about these issues so that they can make informed choices. I talked with Dr. Nancy Davidson from the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center about the decisions women must make after they have been diagnosed as having breast cancer.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | November 30, 1995
Two studies to be published today confirm that women with breast cancer who have a lumpectomy followed by radiation have the same survival rate as women who have cancerous breasts removed.About 70 percent of women with early breast cancer were alive after 10 years, whether they had a mastectomy or breast-conserving lumpectomy with radiation, according to a review of 36 breast cancer trials that included more than 17,273 women. The review was to be published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Lumpectomy remains a viable option for women with early breast cancer despite revelations that a key study comparing it favorably to breast removal contained falsified data, doctors said yesterday.But their assurances did little to assuage the anger felt by many women who made the agonizing choice to have breast-conserving surgery after weighing the study, which found no difference in survival rates."I have no doubts about the choice I made -- obviously I'm eight years surviving, and that speaks for itself," said Marsha Oakley, a nurse who runs the breast cancer screening program at St. Agnes Hospital.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | November 30, 1995
Two studies to be published today confirm that women with breast cancer who have a lumpectomy followed by radiation have the same survival rate as women who have cancerous breasts removed.About 70 percent of women with early breast cancer were alive after 10 years, whether they had a mastectomy or breast-conserving lumpectomy with radiation, according to a review of 36 breast cancer trials that included more than 17,273 women. The review was to be published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
After years of controversy over the best way to treat small breast tumors, researchers have found that thousands of older women can forgo radiation treatments without hurting their survival chances. Two studies published today in the New England Journal of Medicine found that radiation provides no added benefit for women over 70 who receive lumpectomies and take the cancer-fighting drug tamoxifen. "It suggests that upfront radiation is not necessary and may in fact be overtreatment for many of the older women," said Dr. Jerome Yates, vice president for research at the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 5, 1993
When Betsy Lambert, a New York lawyer, was told she had breast cancer two years ago, her surgeon advised her to have a lumpectomy, removing only the tumor from her breast, followed by six weeks of radiation treatment.But Ms. Lambert, terrified by the disease, sought two more opinions, one from another surgeon and another from a radiologist. Both urged her to have a mastectomy, removing the entire breast."I really agonized," she said. "It was a very, very scary time." In her heart, she said, she believed "a mastectomy is symbolic of the removal not just of the breast but of the disease."
NEWS
By John Crewdson and John Crewdson,Chicago Tribune | March 13, 1994
PITTSBURGH -- Federal investigators have documented more than a decade of fraud in some of the most important breastcancer research ever conducted, including a landmark 1985 study that established the relative safety of the operation known as lumpectomy and made it a common surgical procedure.The organizers of the study privately assured investigators nearly two years ago that the fraud had not affected the "direction" of their findings about lumpectomy or any of the other major conclusions that have since been drawn from a complex of related breast cancer studies.
FEATURES
By Dr. Neil Solomon | December 8, 1992
Dear Dr. Solomon: My husband has emphysema, and his doctor has referred him to an exercise program. My husband was never much of an athlete, and I think that especially with his emphysema, an exercise program is probably the last thing he needs. I'd rather have him alive with emphysema than have him drop dead pretending to be an athlete. I would greatly appreciate any comment you might make on the subject. -- Kay, Randallstown, Md.Dear Kay: For a person with emphysema, the purpose of an exercise program is rehabilitation, not to make him an athlete.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Lumpectomy remains a viable option for women with early breast cancer despite revelations that a key study comparing it favorably to breast removal contained falsified data, doctors said yesterday.But their assurances did little to assuage the anger felt by many women who made the agonizing choice to have breast-conserving surgery after weighing the study, which found no difference in survival rates."I have no doubts about the choice I made -- obviously I'm eight years surviving, and that speaks for itself," said Marsha Oakley, a nurse who runs the breast cancer screening program at St. Agnes Hospital.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | June 22, 1993
Several major scientific articles have indicated that for women with early stage breast cancer, a lumpectomy with radiotherapy offers the same rate of survival as a mastectomy for the surgical treatment of breast cancer.It is surprising then that most American women with breast cancer still have mastectomies. The reasons for this are puzzling to scientists and are clearly complicated, but it points up the need to educate women about these issues so that they can make informed choices. I talked with Dr. Nancy Davidson from the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center about the decisions women must make after they have been diagnosed as having breast cancer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 5, 1993
When Betsy Lambert, a New York lawyer, was told she had breast cancer two years ago, her surgeon advised her to have a lumpectomy, removing only the tumor from her breast, followed by six weeks of radiation treatment.But Ms. Lambert, terrified by the disease, sought two more opinions, one from another surgeon and another from a radiologist. Both urged her to have a mastectomy, removing the entire breast."I really agonized," she said. "It was a very, very scary time." In her heart, she said, she believed "a mastectomy is symbolic of the removal not just of the breast but of the disease."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | October 20, 1992
For the first time, major health organizations have agreed upon standards clarifying which breast cancer patients should be offered the option of lumpectomy and radiation therapy as an alternative to removal of the breast, the American College of Radiology announced today.At least one-third of all breast cancer patients could be eligible for a lumpectomy -- removal of the primary breast tumor and adjacent breast tissue -- followed by about six weeks of radiation therapy instead of mastectomy, under the new guidelines.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2008
In a stark reversal of a long-term trend, more early-stage breast cancer patients are choosing mastectomy, despite evidence that the aggressive, disfiguring surgery has the same survival rate as removing the malignant lump, new research shows. The study by doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that a more detailed screening technique may have led additional women to have their breasts removed. But researchers also found a rise in mastectomies among women who weren't examined with the new magnetic resonance imaging technology.
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