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By John F. Kelly | October 14, 1991
I WOKE up one morning a few months ago and realized I had some sort of little lump on my lower eyelid. Was I concerned? Concern is not the word for it. I was frantic. I regard any kind of lump-bump on my body with mortal fear. So I called my doctor, who referred me to an ophthalmologist, who gave me an appointment early the next century. Just kidding; actually, it was six weeks. But in my mental state, it might as well have been 2001. I arrived, sick with fear, at the doctor's office and was duly examined.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 13, 2014
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," and as the joke goes, "Poverty won. " Five decades after a blizzard of programs began descending on the American people, the poverty rate remains essentially unchanged. That's a little unfair. What counts as poverty today would not have seemed so impoverished 50 years ago, when many of the poor lived without electricity and were no strangers to hunger. Today, the biggest health problems of the poor are more likely to stem from obesity than anything approaching starvation.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 22, 2013
My 5-year-old chocolate Lab has a soft, squishy lump on her side. I can move it and press it without bothering her, and it doesn't seem to be growing. My vet says it's probably a fatty lump, which are common in labs of her age, and that we should keep an eye on it. But other people tell me I should have it aspirated to be sure it's nothing more. Am I safe to take my vet's hands-off advice, or should I request lab testing?  There are many different kinds of lumps and bumps on and under the skin that veterinarians feel on a daily basis. We are more concerned about some of these lumps than others, based on location, size, and feel. Each day we make recommendations regarding aspiration, surgery or monitoring of these lumps based on our touch. Although we all wish we could diagnose things with just our hands, ultimately, a fine-needle aspirate or biopsy is needed to evaluate and determine the actual cells of this particular lump.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 22, 2013
My 5-year-old chocolate Lab has a soft, squishy lump on her side. I can move it and press it without bothering her, and it doesn't seem to be growing. My vet says it's probably a fatty lump, which are common in labs of her age, and that we should keep an eye on it. But other people tell me I should have it aspirated to be sure it's nothing more. Am I safe to take my vet's hands-off advice, or should I request lab testing?  There are many different kinds of lumps and bumps on and under the skin that veterinarians feel on a daily basis. We are more concerned about some of these lumps than others, based on location, size, and feel. Each day we make recommendations regarding aspiration, surgery or monitoring of these lumps based on our touch. Although we all wish we could diagnose things with just our hands, ultimately, a fine-needle aspirate or biopsy is needed to evaluate and determine the actual cells of this particular lump.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | October 12, 1993
Q: When my daughter went for a sports physical, the doctor found a lump in her breast. He scheduled another visit in a month, but shouldn't she get a mammogram?A: Unless there is a strong family history of early-onset (before menopause) breast cancer in your family, the odds are overwhelming that your daughter has either a small cyst or a fibroadenoma in her breast.Both are benign -- that is, non-cancerous conditions. A fibroadenoma is a localized area of thickened tissue in the breast and very common in teen-agers.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | October 20, 1992
Women should regularly examine their breasts for evidence of lumps or any other irregularities such as thickening, skin dimpling, nipple retraction and scaling around the nipple. They should also check for lumps under the armpit as well."We know the mammogram is not perfect and the physical examination is not perfect. Our chances are 90 percent of detecting cancer with the combination of those two methods," says radiologist Dr. Judy Destouet, head of mammography at Copeland, Hyman & Shackman.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | September 26, 2004
A FRIEND recently confided his agonizing struggle to decide whether he and his wife should accept an early-retirement buyout from her employer. It was a debate that lasted, maybe, 12 minutes. The cash-strapped employer (in this case, the state of Illinois) is offering to double workersM-F pension accounts, plus some interest, if they convert the money from a traditional pension to a lump-sum distribution and leave the payroll. State officials say they hope to eliminate up to 3,000 noncritical jobs through the offer, saving $81 million in the current budget year.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
Maryland law allows small political contributions to be bundled together and reported as "lump sums" in disclosure reports, and to hear defenders of the practice talk about it, the tactic is merely the campaign finance loophole for the little guy. The fat cats have their limited liability corporations, personal loans and political slates that allow them to funnel tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars into candidates' campaign accounts with no...
FEATURES
By Signe Lauren and Signe Lauren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 1998
Amy Rupp was 28 when she accidentally became pregnant.The first five months was a time of great joy and expectation for her and Michael, her fiance. She was a shoe store saleswoman and he was a firefighter. The Baltimore couple was excited when the sonogram showed a boy and they were trying to pick a name. Thomas? Andrew? Christopher? Little did they know that the accidental baby was about to save Rupp's life.During her sixth month of pregnancy, Rupp was in bed reading when she felt a painful lump in her breast, something hard like a stone.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | May 1, 2003
Caryn Andrews will give a presentation about breast health awareness next week to about 150 senior girls at River Hill High School. The program also is aimed at reaching their mothers. "If one of them takes it home and gives her mother a shower card [with instructions for breast self-examination] and one lump is found and that lump is cancer, it will be worth it," said Andrews, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland School of Nursing. "It will be worth it if that lump is found five years from now."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Outside what was once a backyard garage, mugs, sponge holders and broad bowls are lined up on tables to dry. A peek inside the structure reveals dozens of butter dishes, teapots, toothbrush holders, bowls of every size, vases, trays and more, all in various stages of production, resting on racks of shelving. And by the windows, with sunlight illuminating their potter's wheels, Nevan Wise is turning brick-sized blobs of clay into pitchers, and her husband, Doug Wise, is shaping clay lumps into kitchen utensil jars.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 15, 2013
Are Brad Paisley and Rand Paul the bravest men in America? Er, no. At least not by my lights. But maybe the country singer and the first-term senator are contenders for that title according to the attorney general of the United States, Eric Holder. In 2009, Mr. Holder famously declared in a speech that America is a "nation of cowards" because it refuses to talk about race "enough. " What constitutes enough race talk in our private time seems like a hard thing to quantify, and I'm not sure Mr. Holder has any idea how to do it either.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Legg Mason Inc.'s new CEO, Joseph A. Sullivan, announced Tuesday a shake-up of his executive team and the exit of some top officials, including one who had been in the running for chief executive. Sullivan, a Legg insider who was named CEO and president in February, had been serving as interim chief executive after Mark R. Fetting stepped down in October. The Baltimore-based money manager in recent years has suffered from poor performance among some of its mutual funds as well as an outflow of investor dollars.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
The following letter was sent to Laurel Mayor Craig Moe: The condition of Cherry Lane from Van Dusen to Route 197 continues to be a driving irritant to me and others. Extensive and expensive "repairs" continue to be made with little if any improvement in the actual driving conditions of that street; one of the most traveled streets of our city. This past summer major "repairs" were done with entire sections removed and redone. These very areas are now bumpier and rougher than before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
When did Baltimore diners start insisting on jumbo lump crab meat? Menus advertise jumbo lump crab meat in omelets, dips and soups. This not only makes no culinary sense, the lopsided demand it's created for jumbo lump crabmeat has taken a toll on the region's already pinched crab-processing industry. Where did the love of jumbo lump come from. The story in today's Taste section does not include some illuminating comments from Nancy Faidley Devine, the matriarch of Lexington Market's famed Faidley seafood.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
In the story about crabmeat, and the obsession diners and resaurants have for 24-7 jumbo lump crabmeat, Spike Gjerde of Woodberry Kitchen said he would love to able to buy packaged crabmeat taken from the whole crab - a single container, in other words that contained claw, backfin and the occasional unbroken lumps. There's not much demand for that, so crabmeat processsors don't provide it. But former Baltimore Sun reporter Tom Horton told me about one place that does. In fact, Rob Kasper wrote about it in 1996.
FEATURES
By Pat Phillips and Pat Phillips,Medical Tribune News Service | November 29, 1994
Injecting women with a safe radioactive tracer that makes breast cancers "light up" when scanned could prevent many unnecessary breast biopsies, University of California researchers suggest."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | December 4, 1990
A jury has awarded nearly $1 million to a 40-year-old Arnold woman who said she is dying of breast cancer because a well-known Annapolis gynecologist failed to diagnose her disease in time.But the woman's lawyer said she will probably die before she ever sees a penny of the $911,682 award won in a malpractice suit that ended Friday in county Circuit Court."She never did it for the money in the first place," said Steven M.Nemeroff, attorney for Glenna M. Endal. "She's not going to buy a new car or move or anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Remember the Maryland crab cake? It no longer exists. It has been replaced, in the hearts and appetites of Baltimore restaurant diners, by a thing called the jumbo lump crab cake. Tastes change. The crab cake once was a humble second-day meal, composed of the gleanings of a crab feast - flavorful claw meat and, if you were lucky, unbroken pieces of backfin. The restaurant crab cake of today, almost without exception, is made with jumbo lump, a packing category that didn't even exist a few generations ago. And there's another major difference: In the old days, the crab cake served in Baltimore restaurants was made from Maryland crab meat.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Del. Guy Guzzone has $100,274 in campaign cash put aside, likely enough to pay for another run for the General Assembly, but he said his annual home pizza party should boost that total by at least $35,000 as he ponders a run for higher office. "I have not made a decision what I'm going to run for, but county executive is high on the list of possibilities," he said Monday. Thursday evening, his tune didn't change as he spoke to about 200 people, many of them donors who filled his driveway, garage and front lawn eating free pizza.
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