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NEWS
July 16, 1991
Ellicott City is about to lose a landmark at the top of Main Street. Talbott Lumber Co., a small business accurately described as a Howard County institution, will be closing early next month. This family-owned business traces its roots back 146 years -- to a blacksmith shop that opened in 1845, when Ellicott City's economy depended on mills and railroading and the word "suburbanite" wasn't part of the language.From its current 1905-vintage storefront and lumberyard wedged tightly against a sheer, rocky cliff out back, Talbott Lumber looks nondescript -- a 1990s anachronism up against the garish mass-merchandisers that typify today's hardware and lumber enterprises.
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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Lumber Liquidators, a hardwood flooring specialty retailer, has opened a store in Timonium, the third in the Baltimore area. The York Road store offers more than 340 varieties of flooring, including laminate, solid hardwood, engineered hardwood, bamboo, cork and vinyl wood plank. The chain also sells molding, trim, flooring tools and other related products and says it keeps prices low by working directly with mills. Consumers can try out a variety of floors installed in the store, take home samples and consult with flooring specialists.
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NEWS
June 8, 2004
William Saxelby Galvin, who worked in his family's wholesale lumber business for more than five decades, died of complications from a stroke Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Towson resident was 73. Born in Baltimore and raised on St. Alban's Way, he was a 1948 graduate of Boys' Latin School, where he played lacrosse and football. He then served in the Army and was stationed in Germany. In 1950, he joined the Horstmeier Lumber Co., then located in the Inner Harbor and owned by family members.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
Aberdeen James Dewall Gentry, 44, of the 700 block of Gilbert Road, was charged Tuesday with forgery, theft les than $1,000 and issuing a false document. Brian Keith Knechtle, 27, of the 100 block of Darlington Avenue, was charged last Friday with theft less than $1,000. Robert Andrew Buchanan, 59, of the first block of Morning Dove Court, was charged Sunday with second-degree assault. A theft was reported last Friday in the 1000 block of Beards Hill Road. Aberdeen police report: Harassment was reported in the 200 block of Schmechel Street on Tuesday.
NEWS
October 7, 1991
Services for William E. Wilkins II, a retired Baltimore lumber company executive, will be at 11 a.m. today at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd on Boyce Avenue in Ruxton.Mr. Wilkins, who was 73, died of cancer Friday at his Towson home.He worked for F. Bowie Smith & Sons Lumber Co. for 27 years and was vice president of sales before retiring 11 years ago. He remained active with the Maryland Lumbermen's Association and served as a consultant and adviser after his retirement.Born in Cape Charles, Va., he attended public schools there.
NEWS
January 14, 1999
A large tent and lumber that former Carroll Sheriff John H. Brown purchased to build outdoor housing for inmates at the county detention center has been earmarked for donation, Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning announced yesterday.Complaining that the county jail, which was designed for 144 prisoners, was too crowded when inmate population exceeded 190, Brown vowed in November 1997 to set up a tent in the jail's fenced yard and form a posse of unarmed civilian volunteers to help stand guard.Brown's project ran into trouble when a wooden platform was constructed without proper building permits.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 28, 1993
Leonard Fruman knows every limb, splinter and knothole on Baltimore's lumber family tree.At 75, this well-seasoned merchant can cite the origin of an oak-grained door in Highlandtown or what type of stevedore's hook was used to unload pine on Pier 6."Every neighborhood had its own lumberyard and mill once," he says in his National Lumber office on Pulaski Highway. "You had Storck and Arundel in Waverly. You had John Geis in Brooklyn. George Sack was on Harford Road. Today, so much of that business has gone to the national chains and the super stores."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1996
Employees of a Glen Burnie hardware center dodged a getaway car and helped police apprehend two suspects Tuesday who were charged with stealing lumber and possessing drugs, county police said.David Roy Bogdanowicz, 28, of the 7900 block of Allard Court in Glen Burnie, and Patrick Vernon Middleton, 28, of the 1400 block of Annapolis Road in Odenton were charged with two counts of theft, possession of cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bogdanowicz also was charged with two counts of assault with auto, driving without a license, operating an unregistered and uninsured vehicle, and possession of stolen tags.
NEWS
October 8, 2003
Herbert Beatson MacLea, an architectural lumber firm owner who was active in an entry-level job-placement organization, died Sunday of coronary artery disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The North Baltimore resident was 70. Born in Baltimore and raised in Homeland, he was a descendant of William Paca, one of Maryland's signers of the Declaration of Independence. Mr. MacLea attended Calvert School and was a 1950 graduate of Friends School. He earned an engineering degree from Trinity College in Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
February 24, 2005
Guy F. F. Garman, president and owner of a family-owned Baltimore lumber company, died Sunday of a duodenal ulcer at Franklin Square Hospital Center. The longtime Ruxton resident was 82. Mr. Garman was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1940 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, a member of the school's champion ice hockey team and had played varsity lacrosse and baseball. He began his college studies at Cornell University and transferred to the Johns Hopkins University, where he played lacrosse.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
It was just after noon Saturday and a large blue-crab-mobile was drifting out into the harbor with four students from Arbutus Middle School aboard and unable to steer. The problem? A thrown sock puppet that had damaged their controls. The absurd moment captured the spirit of the annual Kinetic Sculpture Race, now in its 15th year, even down to the puppet as the source of mischief — carrying one is a requirement of the competition. School principal Michelle Feeney watched anxiously from a pier at Canton Waterfront Park as a pair of kayakers paddled out to tow the middle-schoolers back to shore, so they could continue on their way. "All they care about is who threw the sock puppet," Feeney said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Dr. Joseph Taler, a retired Glen Burnie family physician who survived the Holocaust in Poland by not wearing his Star of David armband, taking a Christian surname, and hiding in a village, died Sunday of heart failure at his Annapolis home. He was 89. The only child of an attorney and a pharmacist, Dr. Taler was born and raised in Rozwadow, Poland, where he attended high school. Dr. Taler's father, Abraham Taler, who had been a prominent member of the Polish infantry during the 1919-1920 Polish-Bolshevik conflict, had been recalled to active duty in 1939, was later arrested by the Soviets and was on a train bound for Russia when he escaped during a stop.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
With the clock ticking toward Thursday afternoon rush hour, state crews raced to right a tractor-trailer truck and clear the debris that closed all four lanes of the inner loop of Interstate 695 near U.S. 1. The truck was drained of fuel and hitched to a tow truck, and all lanes were open just 2 1/2 hours after the accident happened, the State Highway Administration said. The flat-bed truck, hauling pipes and lumber, tipped over and landed on the driver's side at 12:48 p.m., according to State Police spokesman Greg Shipley.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2012
Richard Ruff "Dick" Stanfield, founder and president of Edrich Lumber Inc. who had been active in community affairs, died Feb. 15 of heart failure at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Windsor Mill resident was 77. The son of farmers, Mr. Stanfield was born in Baltimore and raised on the family dairy farm at McDonogh Road and Church Lane in Randallstown. After graduating from Milford Mill High School in 1952, Mr. Stanfield earned a bachelor's degree in 1956 from the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
A Baltimore-based company has been selected to help Ocean City rebuild its deteriorating boardwalk starting this fall. Ocean City 's town council voted this week to accept a bid from the Louis J. Grasmick Lumber Co. of Baltimore to provide the yellow pine wood needed for the work. Grasmick submitted the low bid of $602,650 for 56,040 pieces of lumber, and it was accepted over proposals from more than a dozen other companies. Ocean City 's boardwalk reconstruction project will be carried out in two phases.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
A Baltimore-based company is one of the leading contenders to help Ocean City rebuild its famous but deteriorating boardwalk. The Louis J. Grasmick Lumber Co. of Baltimore submitted the "apparent low bid" to supply lumber for the first phase of the two-year project, said Terry McGean, city engineer of the resort town. Grasmick was one of 18 companies competing to supply the yellow pine decking needed for the work, and its base offer of $602,250 for 56,040 pieces of lumber was below the city's estimate of nearly $621,000, McGean said.
NEWS
October 3, 1995
Two Glen Burnie men have been charged with burglarizing a Harmans lumber company early Friday.County police said the alarm at Tidewater Hardwood Lumber Co. in the 7500 block of Railroad Ave. went off shortly after 2:30 a.m. Friday. The first officer on the scene heard people running.Another officer found a car parked in the woods near the building, and waited there until two men came running up. When the officer questioned them, one of the men said he worked for the lumber company.Police detained the men while other officers checked the lumber company for evidence, police said.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | March 13, 1995
F. Ward DeGrange Sr., retired president of an Anne Arundel County lumber company that has employed three generations of his family, died Friday of cancer at his home in Glen Burnie. He was 79.In 1948, Mr. DeGrange and his father founded the DeGrange Lumber Co., a family business that now employs Mr. DeGrange's four sons.The Glen Burnie company supplies lumber, hardware and other building supplies to contractors, individual builders and the public.Mr. DeGrange began working with his father in construction in the early 1940s.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
Arnold Blumberg plops the zombie head on a table at the front of the small theater. "I brought a friend," says the University of Baltimore professor, clad in an unbuttoned black shirt adorned with red skulls. Blumberg is meeting his class for the first time and it seems appropriate that he greet them beside "old Worm Eye," undead star of the 1979 Italian cult film "Zombi 2. " It was Worm Eye's decaying visage that called to a young Blumberg from the shelf of a Randallstown video store in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
John T. Galvin III, a retired Baltimore lumber company executive and a World War II naval veteran, was stricken with a stroke at his Ocean City summer home and died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 88. Mr. Galvin, the son of a lumber company executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft. He was a 1939 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree in January 1943 from what is now Loyola University of Maryland. The next month, Mr. Galvin, along with many of his college classmates, entered the V-70 90-day training program at the U.S. Naval Reserve Midshipmen's School in New York City and was commissioned an ensign in June 1943.
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