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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1996
MINSK, Belarus -- With this former Soviet republic teetering on the brink of crisis, thousands of demonstrators marched through the streets yesterday to protest President Alexander Lukashenko's plan to gain near-absolute power.Against a backdrop of red-and-white banners, opposition leaders warned of an impending dictatorship and demanded that he drop his effort to rewrite Belarus' constitution.But Lukashenko had a message of his own.Early yesterday morning, army trucks and armored cars rumbled through Minsk as Lukashenko flexed his muscles before convening a meeting of supporters.
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NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Russian-Belarusian oil dispute that has shut down a key pipeline carrying crude oil to European customers might drag on long enough to force Russia to cut production, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday. The bitter spat between the longtime allies led to a cutoff Monday in the flow of oil across Belarus, prompting complaints from European officials. A warm winter has left Europe with abundant oil supplies, triggering falling prices and keeping a lid on the severity of the continent's short-term worries about the cutoff.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2006
MINSK, Belarus --By midnight, as the temperature dropped ever lower and morning twilight was still five hours off, the core of Belarus' public opposition assumed its shape in the darkness. It was about 300 people, arms interlocked and forming a small, dense square, stomping on the frozen ground under a police cadre's contemptuous gaze. Behind them, inside their human box, another group of demonstrators held their banned flags overhead, a thicket of banners over 20 small tents. At any moment, the demonstrators said, they expected the police to rush forward, beat them with clubs and drag them off to the detention cells.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
MOSCOW -- The opposition politician who last month led protests against the re-election victory of President Aleksandr G. Lukashenko of Belarus was ordered jailed yesterday a day after denouncing the president at a rally in the Belarusian capital. A court in Minsk ordered that Aleksandr Milinkevich serve 15 days in prison for participating in what it deemed an unsanctioned rally during which he called for Lukashenko's impeachment and vowed to "depose this regime" through peaceful protests.
NEWS
June 22, 1998
IN FOUR years since his election, Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko has forged a reputation for the bizarre.For instance, he has proclaimed his admiration for both Hitler and Stalin. Currently, Mr. Lukashenko is campaigning for the return of the Soviet national anthem in his country of 10 million people -- as a first step toward restoring the Communist empire.These antics have not won the increasingly autocratic president plaudits outside his country, formerly part of the Soviet Union, tucked between Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Latvia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2000
MINSK, Belarus - Saying that Europe is poised between "hope and fear" over the future of democracy in Belarus, a delegation from the European Parliament severely criticized yesterday President Aleksandr Lukashenko's assault on his political opponents and threatened to withhold a team of observers for elections he is trying to orchestrate for the fall. The election struggle puts the country of 10 million between Russia and Poland at a crucial junction. Lukashenko is seeking to restore the legitimacy of his hard-line nationalist government after he disbanded a democratically elected parliament in 1996, installed his own rump parliament and extended his term to 2001 in a referendum that was widely condemned as rigged.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2001
MINSK, Belarus -- The dictatorial leader of Belarus claimed a crushing election victory early today over opponents who hoped to ease state control of the economy and end political repression. Election officials said last night that President Alexander Lukashenko held a lead of 78 percent, with three-quarters of the vote counted. Shortly after midnight, Lukashenko went on Belarus television to claim an "elegant victory." But Lukashenko's chief rival in the contest, Vladimir Goncharik, accused the president of election fraud.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Russian-Belarusian oil dispute that has shut down a key pipeline carrying crude oil to European customers might drag on long enough to force Russia to cut production, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday. The bitter spat between the longtime allies led to a cutoff Monday in the flow of oil across Belarus, prompting complaints from European officials. A warm winter has left Europe with abundant oil supplies, triggering falling prices and keeping a lid on the severity of the continent's short-term worries about the cutoff.
NEWS
By Sabra Ayres and Sabra Ayres,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2004
MINSK, Belarus -- In the 10 years since Alexander Lukashenko became president of this small former Soviet republic, political opponents have disappeared, journalists have been sent into internal exile and thousands have been beaten and jailed for participating in political demonstrations. Heavy governmental regulations restrict religious expression by any group other than the Russian Orthodox Church, and the government has confiscated the buildings of a progressive, Belarussian language-only high school.
NEWS
November 23, 1996
NOTHING IN Belarus is as easy as it seems. A deal to defuse a political confrontation between authoritarian President Alexander Lukashenko and the country's parliament began unraveling almost as soon as it was struck yesterday.Under the deal, brokered by Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, the parliament is to agree not to seek Mr. Lukashenko's impeachment. For his part, the president, who wanted to acquire nearly dictatorial powers and extend his term until the year 2001 through a referendum tomorrow, has pledged to regard the results as non-binding.
NEWS
By LIONEL BEEHNER | April 13, 2006
Belarus is ripe for democracy. Despite the weeklong protests and round-the-clock vigils that ended in mass arrests recently, hope is not lost. Nor is the next opportunity to usher in democratic change in five years, when Alexander Lukashenko, Europe's last dictator, is expected to seek a fourth term. Opposition groups are saying privately that Mr. Lukashenko' grip on power has been weakened. With the right mixture of carrots and sticks from the West, and a little nudging from Moscow, his power will only further erode and Belarus will end its self-isolation, democratize and integrate into Europe.
NEWS
By KIM MURPHY and KIM MURPHY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 2006
MOSCOW -- A rally billed as a last-ditch attempt to challenge discredited presidential elections in Belarus erupted in violence yesterday as riot police plunged into the crowd with truncheons and arrested dozens of people, including opposition candidate Alexander Kozulin. As protesters, some of them bloodied, ran screaming from the scene, police chased ringleaders down side streets of the capital, Minsk, clubbing them to the ground once they were caught. "Law enforcement took maximum security measures to prevent an escalation and protected people who were simply trying to spend their leisure time nearby," Interior Minister Vladimir Naumov said at a news conference later in the day. He accused Kozulin, one of two opposition candidates who unsuccessfully challenged President Alexander Lukashenko in last Sunday's elections, of urging supporters to storm a jail where detained activists were being held and also calling "for the physical elimination of the head of state and for a power grab."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2006
MINSK, Belarus --By midnight, as the temperature dropped ever lower and morning twilight was still five hours off, the core of Belarus' public opposition assumed its shape in the darkness. It was about 300 people, arms interlocked and forming a small, dense square, stomping on the frozen ground under a police cadre's contemptuous gaze. Behind them, inside their human box, another group of demonstrators held their banned flags overhead, a thicket of banners over 20 small tents. At any moment, the demonstrators said, they expected the police to rush forward, beat them with clubs and drag them off to the detention cells.
NEWS
March 22, 2006
President Bush was going on again yesterday about success in Iraq; three years into the war, it is, no doubt, a little unrealistic to expect him to suddenly start coming to terms with reality. Polls suggest that most Americans have learned to tune him out, which may be a healthy reaction for the individual but doesn't bode well for the nation. For three years, the president has talked about progress, and yet the future of Iraq looks darker now than ever before. And it's not just Iraq; it seems the obliviousness is spreading.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
MINSK, Belarus -- International monitors declared Sunday's presidential election in Belarus invalid yesterday, as opposition activists in the capital organized a second night of protests and called for a new vote this summer. The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe said the election that gave President Alexander Lukashenko a third term with nearly 83 percent of the vote was marred by irregularities in the counting of ballots after widespread harassment of opposition candidates.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 20, 2006
MINSK, Belarus -- Thousands of demonstrators gathered here last night even as President Alexander Lukashenko seemed assured of an overwhelming re-election victory, as unofficial results showed him receiving more than 80 percent of the vote and his nearest competitor about 2 percent. Supporters of the main opposition candidate, Alexander Milinkevich, dismissed those figures, pointing to different polling data that indicated Lukashenko had failed to receive the 50 percent necessary to avoid a runoff.
NEWS
December 1, 1996
THE WORLD HAS been lucky. Even though the disintegration of the Soviet Union has produced plenty of political and economic convulsions, none of the 15 former Soviet republics has become a source of regional instability.So far.All this now threatens to change because of a bizarre power struggle in Belarus. After opposition parliamentarians wanted to tinker with a recent Moscow-brokered political compromise, President Alexander Lukashenko decided he had no reason to negotiate and went ahead with a controversial referendum.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
MINSK, Belarus -- International monitors declared Sunday's presidential election in Belarus invalid yesterday, as opposition activists in the capital organized a second night of protests and called for a new vote this summer. The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe said the election that gave President Alexander Lukashenko a third term with nearly 83 percent of the vote was marred by irregularities in the counting of ballots after widespread harassment of opposition candidates.
NEWS
By Sabra Ayres and Sabra Ayres,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2004
MINSK, Belarus -- In the 10 years since Alexander Lukashenko became president of this small former Soviet republic, political opponents have disappeared, journalists have been sent into internal exile and thousands have been beaten and jailed for participating in political demonstrations. Heavy governmental regulations restrict religious expression by any group other than the Russian Orthodox Church, and the government has confiscated the buildings of a progressive, Belarussian language-only high school.
NEWS
September 11, 2001
BELARUS IS a small country with big problems. Among them is its tyrannical President Alexander Lukashenko, who just won a rigged election. In six years, the former collective farm director has turned Belarus into Europe's most repressive country. Opposition newspapers are banned; government critics silenced. Stalinist economic ideas and the secret police rule. However insignificant this backward nation may appear, it is a potential troublemaker as one source of arms for Saddam Hussein and other international pariahs.
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