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By DAN RODRICKS | June 7, 1995
Holy cannoli, look what I started in Little Italy. The St. Anthony Festival is this weekend. The boccie tournament is Sunday at high noon. And not only is Luigi Boeri proclaiming himself the champ already, but he's bad-mouthing me.Why? Because in last week's column announcing the competition and my search for a partner, I failed to list Luigi Boeri's name among Little Italy's finest players. (Luigi Boeri doesn't even like the way I spell boccie -- with an "i" -- which is the Anglicized version favored by this English-language newspaper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Open only since last month, Luigi's Italian Deli in Hampden avoids any of the missteps that invariably are part of a new restaurant. Luigi's, and several of the small restaurants on 36th Street in Hampden, aka The Avenue, belie the old adage that patrons are reluctant to walk up stairs to a restaurant. At the top of these steps is a pleasant porch furnished with four tiny tables. Sipping a Blood Orange Pellegrino and tackling one of the specialty sandwiches makes scaling a few steps a small price to pay. There is also a spacious patio out back.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 12, 1995
I have good news and bad news from yesterday's boccie tournament at the St. Anthony Festival in Little Italy. First the bad news: My partner and I blew a 6-1 lead (we only needed 7 points to win) in the second round and got the hook. Basically, we choked. But here's the good news: We beat Luigi Boeri, the self-proclaimed Numero Uno Boccie Man of Little Italy. We knocked Boeri off in the first round, and for one brief shining moment victory smelled as strong as a double espresso.If you remember Luigi Boeri -- he was all over this column last Wednesday -- you understand why this little win was so very nice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Luigi's Italian Deli opened Thursday in Hampden. It's on that block of front-porch businesses, just a few doors down from the Verandah. The owners are Jeanine and Ryan Little of Reisterstown. This is a counter operation, with some seating inside and outside on the porch. On the menu are specialty sandwiches like the Isabella with prosciutto di Parma, soppressata, dry-cured coppa, Asiago, green olive spread and tomato, and Luigi's Italian Cold Cut with mortadella, salame, capicollo, prosciuttini and provolone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | April 10, 2008
Greg Orendorff, the owner and operator of Luigi Petti in Little Italy for 16 years, has closed down the cozy bistro and opened a restaurant in Arbutus, closer to his home. Like Luigi Petti, Gianni's, which opened about a year ago, offers red-sauce favorites like homemade lasagna and ravioli. And like Luigi Petti, known as one of Little Italy's more reasonably priced destinations, Gianni's gives customers a lot of food for their money. -- Poor:]
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 21, 2002
Luigi Petti is something of a new kid on the block as far as Little Italy restaurants go. It's been open a dozen years, which is an eternity compared with most restaurants. But Little Italy seems to be the exception; Baltimore institutions like Sabatino's, Velleggia's and Chiapparelli's, along with many other old-timers, still hold sway there. When Luigi Petti first opened, it must have seemed quite daring, with the main dining room's black and pink supper-club look. Even now it's the only restaurant in the neighborhood that has a multilevel, plant-filled deck for al fresco dining.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 6, 1997
SALT THE PASTA WATER. That is one of Luigi Ferrucci's rules for cooking pasta. Since Luigi was making dinner -- spaghetti with squid ink, and bow-tie-shaped pasta topped with dried tuna eggs -- his rule was followed.Luigi -- an Italian physician, a health-care researcher and a family friend -- was in Baltimore to take a short summer course at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. After class he stopped by our house to cook. He has a sure hand in the kitchen and has firm opinions about how Italian food should be prepared.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2003
The Nativity scene at the Catholic Center is a small masterpiece of woodcarving by the peasant artisans of a remote village high in the Peruvian Andes. The creche might be an altar piece from Renaissance Italy, with the finely carved Virgin praying, St. Joseph reverent, a shepherd and king adoring at the crib side, an ox and a donkey peering from the stable. But the shepherds with their sheep stepping into the scene under the golden guiding star could be peasants from the high Andes village of Chacas where the figures were carved.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 19, 1996
It seemed like an ordinary Maryland Tuesday, when routine ruled and supper would be nothing special.But onto the scene came a bag of polenta and a visitor named Luigi. The polenta, golden cornmeal, arrived via an Italian food store, Trinacria on North Paca Street, near Baltimore's Lexington Market. The visitor, Luigi Ferrucci, came to Baltimore from Florence, Italy, via Bethesda.Luigi is a physician and was in Bethesda for one of his periodic research stints at the National Institute on Aging.
NEWS
November 12, 2004
On November 9, 2004, Dr. FAUSTO MARIA PREZIOSO M.D.; Beloved husband of Helen (nee Mullaney) Prezioso; devoted father of Giovanni Prezioso and his wife Elizabeth, Elena Prezioso, Luigi Prezioso and his wife Valerie, Maria Beyer and her husband Donald, Giulia Tearnan and her husband Lance, Franco Prezioso and his wife Daryl, Andrea Prezioso and Antonio Prezioso and his wife Donna. He is also survived 19 grandchildren and one great-grandchild; dear brother of Giuseppina Cuccia and Luigi Prezioso; dear son of the late Dr. Pasquale and Elena Prezioso.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2011
It's a pleasure to end the year on a high note. Taste Mediterranean Grille has opened in the space that Cafe Troia left for shinier digs on the other side of Allegheny Avenue in Towson. The chef and owner of Taste, Luigi Palumbo, recently relocated here from Naples, where he operated a restaurant called A Ridosso. His American debut is off to a fine start. I went to review Taste — no relation to Ann Nault's similarly named Belvedere Square restaurant — on a cold weeknight before the holidays.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Luigi "Gino" Manelli, whose career as a professional artist and teacher spanned seven decades and who was known for his use of color and light, died Saturday of cancer at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation Center in Southwest Baltimore. He was 94. Mr. Manelli, who was known as "Gino," was born in Philadelphia to parents who emigrated from Abruzzo. In 1923, he returned to Italy with his parents, who established a general store and later a laundry business. As a youngster, he began doodling on old dry-goods bags he found in his parents' store; when he was older, he began taking formal lessons from artists in Abruzzo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | April 10, 2008
Greg Orendorff, the owner and operator of Luigi Petti in Little Italy for 16 years, has closed down the cozy bistro and opened a restaurant in Arbutus, closer to his home. Like Luigi Petti, Gianni's, which opened about a year ago, offers red-sauce favorites like homemade lasagna and ravioli. And like Luigi Petti, known as one of Little Italy's more reasonably priced destinations, Gianni's gives customers a lot of food for their money. -- Poor:]
NEWS
November 12, 2004
On November 9, 2004, Dr. FAUSTO MARIA PREZIOSO M.D.; Beloved husband of Helen (nee Mullaney) Prezioso; devoted father of Giovanni Prezioso and his wife Elizabeth, Elena Prezioso, Luigi Prezioso and his wife Valerie, Maria Beyer and her husband Donald, Giulia Tearnan and her husband Lance, Franco Prezioso and his wife Daryl, Andrea Prezioso and Antonio Prezioso and his wife Donna. He is also survived 19 grandchildren and one great-grandchild; dear brother of Giuseppina Cuccia and Luigi Prezioso; dear son of the late Dr. Pasquale and Elena Prezioso.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2003
The Nativity scene at the Catholic Center is a small masterpiece of woodcarving by the peasant artisans of a remote village high in the Peruvian Andes. The creche might be an altar piece from Renaissance Italy, with the finely carved Virgin praying, St. Joseph reverent, a shepherd and king adoring at the crib side, an ox and a donkey peering from the stable. But the shepherds with their sheep stepping into the scene under the golden guiding star could be peasants from the high Andes village of Chacas where the figures were carved.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 21, 2002
Luigi Petti is something of a new kid on the block as far as Little Italy restaurants go. It's been open a dozen years, which is an eternity compared with most restaurants. But Little Italy seems to be the exception; Baltimore institutions like Sabatino's, Velleggia's and Chiapparelli's, along with many other old-timers, still hold sway there. When Luigi Petti first opened, it must have seemed quite daring, with the main dining room's black and pink supper-club look. Even now it's the only restaurant in the neighborhood that has a multilevel, plant-filled deck for al fresco dining.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Luigi's Italian Deli opened Thursday in Hampden. It's on that block of front-porch businesses, just a few doors down from the Verandah. The owners are Jeanine and Ryan Little of Reisterstown. This is a counter operation, with some seating inside and outside on the porch. On the menu are specialty sandwiches like the Isabella with prosciutto di Parma, soppressata, dry-cured coppa, Asiago, green olive spread and tomato, and Luigi's Italian Cold Cut with mortadella, salame, capicollo, prosciuttini and provolone.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Luigi "Gino" Manelli, whose career as a professional artist and teacher spanned seven decades and who was known for his use of color and light, died Saturday of cancer at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation Center in Southwest Baltimore. He was 94. Mr. Manelli, who was known as "Gino," was born in Philadelphia to parents who emigrated from Abruzzo. In 1923, he returned to Italy with his parents, who established a general store and later a laundry business. As a youngster, he began doodling on old dry-goods bags he found in his parents' store; when he was older, he began taking formal lessons from artists in Abruzzo.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
Luigi A. Colucciello, a retired Coast Guard captain and a former member of the National Transportation Safety Board who was one of the lead investigators of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, died Oct. 2 from a heart attack at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 74.Mr. Colucciello, 74, of Arnold was considered an expert on marine safety and lectured nationally and internationally on the topic.As chief of the NTSB's marine accident division, he was a hearing officer at the public hearings on the March 1989 accident of the Exxon Valdez.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 6, 1997
SALT THE PASTA WATER. That is one of Luigi Ferrucci's rules for cooking pasta. Since Luigi was making dinner -- spaghetti with squid ink, and bow-tie-shaped pasta topped with dried tuna eggs -- his rule was followed.Luigi -- an Italian physician, a health-care researcher and a family friend -- was in Baltimore to take a short summer course at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. After class he stopped by our house to cook. He has a sure hand in the kitchen and has firm opinions about how Italian food should be prepared.
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