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By Candus Thomson | February 13, 2010
- Just hours before the caldron was lighted to mark the start of these Winter Olympics, a young athlete's life was snuffed out in a horrific crash on the world's fastest luge track. On a morning practice run under the first blue sky in days, Nodar Kumaritashvili, 21, of the Republic of Georgia lost control of his sled at about 80 mph as he came out of the final curve - nicknamed Thunderbird - and approached the finish line. He was catapulted over the outer lip of the track and slammed into an unpadded roof support post.
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By Stacy St. Clair and Tribune Olympic bureau | February 11, 2014
SOCHI, Russia - U.S. luger Summer Britcher competes in an individual sport, but these Games have been all about the team for the Baltimore-born teen and her fellow American sliders. Britcher - who finished 15th in the women's event, which concluded Tuesday - celebrated teammate Erin Hamlin's historic bronze medal almost as if she had made the podium herself.  She struggled to contain her emotions as she described what the Olympic medal - the first for the United States in a singles luge event -  would mean both to her friend and her federation.
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SPORTS
By Stacy St. Clair and Tribune Olympic bureau | February 10, 2014
SOCHI, Russia - Meeting the international press here for the first time here last week, Summer Britcher frowned when a journalist referred to her as a surprise member of the U.S. luge team. After all, the reporter asked, who would have expected the Baltimore-born teenager to beat out more veteran sliders for an Olympic spot? Britcher gave a small smirk and then answered with the fearlessness of someone who willingly hurls herself down an icy track on a cookie sheet. “I did,” the 19-year-old said.
SPORTS
December 16, 2013
MONDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS Univ. Gms F. Skat.: Ladies Short, Dual Full Prog. (T) CBSSN3 M. bask. Troy@Kansas State (T) MASN2Noon St. John's vs. Syracuse (T) FS11 Texas-Pan Am.@Texas Christian (T) FCS6 Miss. Valley St.@Northwestern BIGTEN7 Gardner-Webb@Duke ESPNU7 W. bask. Army@Ohio State (T) BIGTEN10 a.m. UMES@Oklahoma (T) FCSNoon East Tennessee State@Kentucky (T) FCS2 Texas-Pan Am.@Texas Christian (T)
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 11, 2010
The joke among the women of luge is that the highest non-German finisher at any race is the real winner, so strong is that team's grip on the top of the podium. Erin Hamlin is tired of being a punch line. "Yeah, it gets old," says Hamlin, 23, of Remsen, N.Y. "We improve every year, but we still have a place to look up to." With 97 consecutive World Cup wins dating back to 1997, the German hold has engendered that kind of black humor. Last year, Hamlin struck back with a gold medal at the World Championships on her home track at Lake Placid, a win that stunned the Germans, who even admitted their shock to reporters in an uncharacteristic moment of candor.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | December 18, 2005
Lake Placid, N.Y. -- Villains in American sport date back at least 100 years when scoundrels such as Ty Cobb roamed the basepaths as though hunting season had just begun. Later, we had the Raiders, the Pistons, the hockey goon and just about any Soviet athlete during the Cold War. s blog at baltimoresun.com/maeseblog Point after -- Rick Maese The luge looks like a lot of fun, doesn't it? It's like when you were younger and you went down a twisty slide at the park. Only this slide is made of ice. And it's highly probable that you'll suffer permanent injury.
SPORTS
By Mary Schmitt and Mary Schmitt,Knight-Ridder | February 11, 1992
LA PLAGNE, France -- Cammy Myler wasn't going to let a little thing like a stomach virus interrupt her quest for an Olympic medal.Myler, 23, of Lake Placid, N.Y., got only about 20 minutes of sleep last night after waking up with stomach problems. But she still turned in a combined time of 1:34.023 for two runs in the women's luge and stood in sixth place with two more runs to come tomorrow.Erica Terwillegar, 28, of Lake Placid, was in seventh place at 1:34.281 and Bonnie Warner, 29, of Mount Baldy, Calif.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
When a former world champion comes to town and sets a speed record at your track in the opening minutes of a World Cup competition, is it time to fold up the tent? Not if you're Becky Wilczak, a member of the U.S. women's luge squad. "That didn't bother me. It just told me the ice was fast," said Wilczak of the 44.021-second run by Germany's Sonja Wiedemann. Wiedemann, the 1999 world champion, had a two-race total time of 1:28.981 in Lake Placid, N.Y., that was good for the gold medal.
FEATURES
By Georgia N. Alexakis and Georgia N. Alexakis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Every last detail had been carefully planned: the date, the time, the place.All that the United States Luge Association needed was a go-ahead from Congress -- permission to use Capitol Hill for a summer luge clinic designed to help the national team find its next generation of Olympic hopefuls.But earlier this week, a Senate committee put the brakes on the luge team's plans. The committee declined to take up a resolution that would have allowed the team to set up a dry-track luge course on the north side of Capitol Hill and on a quarter-mile stretch of Constitution Avenue.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- One run at 80 mph through a bunch of curves and up and down 10-foot walls gave Wendel Suckow a thrill of a lifetime, and a rush for the gold."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
A report by the International Luge Federation has concluded that a series of events, including driver error, caused the crash that killed Republic of Georgia athlete Nodar Kumaritashvili just hours before the start of the Winter Olympics. Sandwiched between a glowing introductory tribute to Kumaritashvili and an attempt by the federation to repair its image in the final pages is a re-creation of the athlete's final moments and the safety measures taken before and after the crash.
SPORTS
February 28, 2010
W - Before the Olympics, before the ski resort of Whistler existed, before the athletes' village was built, there were garbage dumps. And those piles of trash attracted black bears like a free keg attracts tailgaters. An estimated 100 bears still live around Whistler Village, showing up at the ski lifts, prowling behind the upscale restaurants and poking around the bobsled track. Fact: Before the start of competition, a black bear wandered to the edge of the track near the top and then scooted under the railing and back into the woods.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candus.thomson@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 14, 2010
On an icy track slowed by bureaucracy and weather, Germany's Felix Loch won the men's luge competition by being the overall best at the start. At 20, he is the youngest luge gold medalist. The two-time world champion derailed Italy's Armin Zoeggler from his quest for three consecutive gold medals in a competition largely decided by international federation officials, who lowered the starting line about 600 vertical feet to the women's take-off point after last Friday's fatal crash.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candus.thomson@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 13, 2010
Taming the world's fastest luge track to prevent the type of crash that killed a young slider during a training run didn't do much to alter the standings Saturday among the world's elite sliders after the first of four runs. With a light snow falling, Germany's Felix Loch, who holds the track record of 95.6 mph, was in first place with a time of 48.168 seconds. Countryman David Moeller, a two-time world champion who finished fifth in the Turin Olympics, is in second, just .179 seconds back.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 13, 2010
- Just hours before the caldron was lighted to mark the start of these Winter Olympics, a young athlete's life was snuffed out in a horrific crash on the world's fastest luge track. On a morning practice run under the first blue sky in days, Nodar Kumaritashvili, 21, of the Republic of Georgia lost control of his sled at about 80 mph as he came out of the final curve - nicknamed Thunderbird - and approached the finish line. He was catapulted over the outer lip of the track and slammed into an unpadded roof support post.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candus.thomson@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 12, 2010
Just hours before the caldron was lighted to mark the start of these Winter Olympics, a young athlete's life was snuffed out in a horrific crash on the world's fastest luge track. On a morning training run under the first blue sky in days, Nodar Kumaritashvili, 21, of the Republic of Georgia lost control of his sled at about 80 mph as he came out of the final curve--nicknamed Thunderbird--and approached the finish line. He was catapulted over the outer lip of the track and slammed into an unpadded roof support post.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 13, 1992
LA PLAGNE, France -- Awake at dawn to catch a bus to the outer banks of the Olympics: the women's luge finals, located 6,000 feet up the mountain in a tree-lined burg so small you can shout from one end to the other."
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