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By Glenn McNatt | September 21, 1997
A SPIRITED debate broke out on the Internet recently, prompted by a German watch manufacturer's announcement that it would market a commemorative version of the wristwatches worn by Luftwaffe pilots during World War II."Does the watch come with a swastika?" sneered one writer in a watch-collectors' chat room."You must be kidding!" exclaimed another, who thought the company's plan "the most crass and offensive marketing scheme ever to have come along." He offered his "most sincere wishes for the complete failure [of]
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By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
BERLIN -- In a wacky corner of cyberspace, rubber ducks stamped with Adolf Hitler faces sing in the bathwater. Their voices in squeaky unison, they bob to reggae music as bombs fall on Berlin, while the Nazi dictator himself, a manic cartoon trapped in a bunker, sings: "Surrender? No, it's not my cup of tea." The voice belongs to Thomas Pigor, a cabaret singer with a mischievous sense of timing. He and irreverent comic-book writer Walter Moers collaborated on the short video Adolf - The Bonker.
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NEWS
By Der Spiegel | June 23, 1991
As World War II was winding down and the Third Reich was in its final days, British and U.S. military experts began a feverish hunt for military photographic archives deemed to be of enormous significance.Worried that the collected reconnaissance photos of the German air force might fall into Soviet hands, the British and Americans formed special units to search for the photo library of the Luftwaffe. The code name of the secret operation was Dick Tracy.Operation Tracy finally found its photos in a haystack near Bad Reichenhall in Bavaria.
NEWS
July 28, 2004
Walter Frentz, 96, who followed Adolf Hitler's inner circle as a Luftwaffe cameraman during the final years of World War II and recorded some of the Nazi era's key events on film, died July 6 in the southern town of Ueberlingen, his son told the Associated Press. Mr. Frentz met Albert Speer, who would become Hitler's architect, while a student in Berlin. Through Speer, he met Leni Riefenstahl, who made masterful propaganda films for the Nazis, including Triumph of the Will in 1934. Eventually lacking assignments, he joined the Luftwaffe - the German air force - in 1938 and was a cameraman as Hitler entered newly annexed Austria that year.
NEWS
By Richard H.P. Sia and Richard H.P. Sia,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
MOMBASA, Kenya -- It's high noon, and the aroma of steaks on a charcoal grill wafts through the heavy air from a remote corner of a makeshift airfield here.A high-protein meal for some Somalian refugees? No. It's the German Luftwaffe getting ready for lunch."Whenever we go out of the country, we eat steaks and, how do you call it, surf and turf," says Air Force Lt. Andreas Block, savoring every bit of his meal.The young, blond lieutenant of classic German looks, and his 45 fellow airmen of Air Transport Wing 63, based in Hohn, Germany, also have brought along a set of porcelain dinnerware, stainless steel coolers to keep their fruit juices well chilled and cases of German beer.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 31, 1992
Munich opened its $5.5 billion Franz Josef Strauss Airport earlier this month to mixed reviews. The facility replaces the old airport inaugurated in 1939 by the Nazi Luftwaffe chief Hermann Goring.The design uses a system of "passenger modules" that limits the walking distance between the point of arrival at the terminal and the boarding ramps to 165 feet; the distance is longer for those transferring between planes or arriving on the S-Bahn regional train.However, road access from the city to the new airport, almost 18 miles northeast of downtown, is on a stretch of the Autobahn that is the most congested in Bavaria, especially during morning and afternoon rush hours.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Germany wants to expand its military presence in the United States and establish a more or less permanent operating base in line with its new entitlement to "equal rights and equal obligations" in the Western alliance, two Bonn legislators said here yesterday.The defense specialists, members of the governing-coalition parties, said the new meaning of "reciprocity" for unified Germany was that German troops could be stationed in other European countries and the United States, as foreign troops would continue to be based in their country.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson | January 28, 1996
SEPT. 12, 1944; thick dark, smoke plumed from the ruins of a Nazi ordnance depot in Magdeburg, Germany. At 26,000 feet, high above, the American Flying Fortresses turned for the long flight back to England.Suddenly, from out of nowhere, the Luftwaffe unleashed an aerial blitzkrieg. In just over a minute, 10 of the 12 B-17 bombers led by Capt. Ellis M. Woodward, of Rodgers Forge, went down, most of them in flames. A few parachutes bloomed as crewmen bailed out."There was only us and our right wingman left.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | September 18, 1990
In commercials surrounded by news,Chuck Yeager is selling B-2sUnseen by radar,' They're unlike a car --If you're looking for cash back, you lose.the Saudi Arabian grill,Time is what they are not trained to kill;To combat ennui,) All the troops get to seeAre tours from Capitol Hill.Bush keeps a sharp eye on the score:Opinions against versus for;But where will it end' If he follows the trendOf polls that say people want war?Saddam has been likened to Hitler,But his Luftwaffe is luckily littler;If we can frustrate$ His lust for Kuwait,Maybe peace won't be broken,just brittler.
NEWS
July 28, 2004
Walter Frentz, 96, who followed Adolf Hitler's inner circle as a Luftwaffe cameraman during the final years of World War II and recorded some of the Nazi era's key events on film, died July 6 in the southern town of Ueberlingen, his son told the Associated Press. Mr. Frentz met Albert Speer, who would become Hitler's architect, while a student in Berlin. Through Speer, he met Leni Riefenstahl, who made masterful propaganda films for the Nazis, including Triumph of the Will in 1934. Eventually lacking assignments, he joined the Luftwaffe - the German air force - in 1938 and was a cameraman as Hitler entered newly annexed Austria that year.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | September 21, 1997
A SPIRITED debate broke out on the Internet recently, prompted by a German watch manufacturer's announcement that it would market a commemorative version of the wristwatches worn by Luftwaffe pilots during World War II."Does the watch come with a swastika?" sneered one writer in a watch-collectors' chat room."You must be kidding!" exclaimed another, who thought the company's plan "the most crass and offensive marketing scheme ever to have come along." He offered his "most sincere wishes for the complete failure [of]
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson | January 28, 1996
SEPT. 12, 1944; thick dark, smoke plumed from the ruins of a Nazi ordnance depot in Magdeburg, Germany. At 26,000 feet, high above, the American Flying Fortresses turned for the long flight back to England.Suddenly, from out of nowhere, the Luftwaffe unleashed an aerial blitzkrieg. In just over a minute, 10 of the 12 B-17 bombers led by Capt. Ellis M. Woodward, of Rodgers Forge, went down, most of them in flames. A few parachutes bloomed as crewmen bailed out."There was only us and our right wingman left.
NEWS
By Richard H.P. Sia and Richard H.P. Sia,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
MOMBASA, Kenya -- It's high noon, and the aroma of steaks on a charcoal grill wafts through the heavy air from a remote corner of a makeshift airfield here.A high-protein meal for some Somalian refugees? No. It's the German Luftwaffe getting ready for lunch."Whenever we go out of the country, we eat steaks and, how do you call it, surf and turf," says Air Force Lt. Andreas Block, savoring every bit of his meal.The young, blond lieutenant of classic German looks, and his 45 fellow airmen of Air Transport Wing 63, based in Hohn, Germany, also have brought along a set of porcelain dinnerware, stainless steel coolers to keep their fruit juices well chilled and cases of German beer.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 31, 1992
Munich opened its $5.5 billion Franz Josef Strauss Airport earlier this month to mixed reviews. The facility replaces the old airport inaugurated in 1939 by the Nazi Luftwaffe chief Hermann Goring.The design uses a system of "passenger modules" that limits the walking distance between the point of arrival at the terminal and the boarding ramps to 165 feet; the distance is longer for those transferring between planes or arriving on the S-Bahn regional train.However, road access from the city to the new airport, almost 18 miles northeast of downtown, is on a stretch of the Autobahn that is the most congested in Bavaria, especially during morning and afternoon rush hours.
NEWS
By Der Spiegel | June 23, 1991
As World War II was winding down and the Third Reich was in its final days, British and U.S. military experts began a feverish hunt for military photographic archives deemed to be of enormous significance.Worried that the collected reconnaissance photos of the German air force might fall into Soviet hands, the British and Americans formed special units to search for the photo library of the Luftwaffe. The code name of the secret operation was Dick Tracy.Operation Tracy finally found its photos in a haystack near Bad Reichenhall in Bavaria.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Germany wants to expand its military presence in the United States and establish a more or less permanent operating base in line with its new entitlement to "equal rights and equal obligations" in the Western alliance, two Bonn legislators said here yesterday.The defense specialists, members of the governing-coalition parties, said the new meaning of "reciprocity" for unified Germany was that German troops could be stationed in other European countries and the United States, as foreign troops would continue to be based in their country.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
BERLIN -- In a wacky corner of cyberspace, rubber ducks stamped with Adolf Hitler faces sing in the bathwater. Their voices in squeaky unison, they bob to reggae music as bombs fall on Berlin, while the Nazi dictator himself, a manic cartoon trapped in a bunker, sings: "Surrender? No, it's not my cup of tea." The voice belongs to Thomas Pigor, a cabaret singer with a mischievous sense of timing. He and irreverent comic-book writer Walter Moers collaborated on the short video Adolf - The Bonker.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Though I hate how big and intrusive our government has become, I don't believe Edward Snowden was aware of the bigger picture when he leaked secret information about the National Security Agency's spying ("Source of NSA leaks named," June 10). He forgot that by leaking the information about the NSA's snooping on Americans, he also informed our enemies of its extent as well. One can't tell the American people about something without telling the rest of the world. Because of that, Mr. Snowden's narrow-mindedness should be considered selfish and traitorous.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | September 18, 1990
In commercials surrounded by news,Chuck Yeager is selling B-2sUnseen by radar,' They're unlike a car --If you're looking for cash back, you lose.the Saudi Arabian grill,Time is what they are not trained to kill;To combat ennui,) All the troops get to seeAre tours from Capitol Hill.Bush keeps a sharp eye on the score:Opinions against versus for;But where will it end' If he follows the trendOf polls that say people want war?Saddam has been likened to Hitler,But his Luftwaffe is luckily littler;If we can frustrate$ His lust for Kuwait,Maybe peace won't be broken,just brittler.
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