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By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, a New York-based brokerage firm, opened an office in Baltimore yesterday and hired a key executive from Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown to run the operation.William F. Rienhoff IV, a former Alex. Brown managing director, left that company Wednesday to join Donaldson Lufkin as the production and sales manager of the new office, said Catherine Conroy, a spokeswoman for the company.Rienhoff headed Alex. Brown's flagship brokerage office downtown for about 11 years before stepping down from the position in June.
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NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Pfc. Caleb A. Lufkin landed on the helipad at about 12:30 p.m., screaming at the sky as a small all-terrain vehicle carried him past the palm trees and concrete bunkers to the emergency room. Doctors inside cut off his blood-covered boots and prepared to sedate him and insert a breathing tube, and he pleaded with them to keep him alive. "Don't let me die," he said. "I won't let you die," answered Capt. David Steinbruner, an Army doctor. "I promise. I give you my word."
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NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
LUFKIN, Tex. - After more than 2 1/2 months of searching nearly 600,000 acres, the extraordinary process of recovering pieces of the space shuttle Columbia is coming to an end. The painstaking search - which involved almost 6,000 people at its peak in early March - will essentially stop April 30, officials announced this week. The last of the three base camps that have served the people searching huge swaths of east Texas will close May 2. Only 13 people will be left two weeks later. The mother ship for the operation - the Disaster Field Office in Lufkin - shuts May 10, and the remaining recovery operations will move to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
LUFKIN, Tex. - After more than 2 1/2 months of searching nearly 600,000 acres, the extraordinary process of recovering pieces of the space shuttle Columbia is coming to an end. The painstaking search - which involved almost 6,000 people at its peak in early March - will essentially stop April 30, officials announced this week. The last of the three base camps that have served the people searching huge swaths of east Texas will close May 2. Only 13 people will be left two weeks later. The mother ship for the operation - the Disaster Field Office in Lufkin - shuts May 10, and the remaining recovery operations will move to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Pfc. Caleb A. Lufkin landed on the helipad at about 12:30 p.m., screaming at the sky as a small all-terrain vehicle carried him past the palm trees and concrete bunkers to the emergency room. Doctors inside cut off his blood-covered boots and prepared to sedate him and insert a breathing tube, and he pleaded with them to keep him alive. "Don't let me die," he said. "I won't let you die," answered Capt. David Steinbruner, an Army doctor. "I promise. I give you my word."
TOPIC
By Ernest Murray | June 20, 1999
LUFKIN, TEXAS -- Kids today see reruns of "The Andy Griffith Show" and probably think life in Mayberry was no more real than what the Clampett family experienced in Beverly Hills. But, for many of us who grew up in the 1950s and '60s, life did imitate art -- we just didn't know it at the time.A friend sent me this list of remembrances that kids today just might not believe existed except in a TV sitcom.Being sent to the drugstore to test vacuum tubes for the TV or radio.When Kool-Aid was the only drink for kids, other than milk and sodas.
NEWS
By Ernest Murray | December 26, 1999
LUFKIN, Texas -- Do you believe everything you read? After perusing this list of "little. known facts" e-mailed to me by a friend, I have to admit some of these items are a little far-fetched. But then again, the same can be said abput astrology and wrestling.You be the judge. Here are some facts you may have never known until now:A Saudi Arabian woman can get a divorce if her husband doesn't give her coffee.A shark can detect one part of. blood in 100 million parts of water.The 57 on a Heinz ketchup bottle represents the number of ingredients in the sauce.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | March 18, 2007
It's a rare moment in journalism when a story triggers a public outcry loud enough that it leads to promises of dramatic change in public policy. But that's what happened when The Washington Post published its two-part report last month on the dreadful living conditions of Iraq war veterans at an outpatient facility at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The articles sparked a series of resignations among the Army's top medical officers, the creation of a presidential investigative commission and pledges from the military medical system to make significant changes in the care of wounded soldiers.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | February 15, 1998
DALLAS -- Picture Big Bird. Now picture Big Bird careening toward your oncoming car at 30 miles an hour."It's not so funny when Big Bird is an emu and he's coming at you," said Johnny Waldrip, chief deputy sheriff in Grayson County (Sherman), Texas. "When you've got a wild emu running down a major highway, you've got a problem."He and other law enforcement officials said stray emus spooking horses, chasing cattle into fences, startling rural homeowners and sending cars swerving on backwoods roads have become common occurrences from the Houston suburbs to the Red River and in the rolling ranch country west of Fort Worth.
NEWS
February 22, 1991
Services for Jean Waddell Glidden, a Ruxton resident and volunteer at Children's Hospital, will be held at 11 a.m. today at St. David's Episcopal Church, 4700 Roland Ave., Roland Park.Mrs. Glidden, who lived in the Elkridge Estates, died of heart failure Tuesday at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 79.A native of Fairmont, W.Va., Mrs. Glidden received her bachelor's degree from Goucher College in 1933. She had been an agent for Dorothy Fitzgerald Realty Co. of Baltimore and an editorial assistant for the Johns Hopkins Press.
NEWS
By Ernest Murray | December 26, 1999
LUFKIN, Texas -- Do you believe everything you read? After perusing this list of "little. known facts" e-mailed to me by a friend, I have to admit some of these items are a little far-fetched. But then again, the same can be said abput astrology and wrestling.You be the judge. Here are some facts you may have never known until now:A Saudi Arabian woman can get a divorce if her husband doesn't give her coffee.A shark can detect one part of. blood in 100 million parts of water.The 57 on a Heinz ketchup bottle represents the number of ingredients in the sauce.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, a New York-based brokerage firm, opened an office in Baltimore yesterday and hired a key executive from Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown to run the operation.William F. Rienhoff IV, a former Alex. Brown managing director, left that company Wednesday to join Donaldson Lufkin as the production and sales manager of the new office, said Catherine Conroy, a spokeswoman for the company.Rienhoff headed Alex. Brown's flagship brokerage office downtown for about 11 years before stepping down from the position in June.
TOPIC
By Ernest Murray | June 20, 1999
LUFKIN, TEXAS -- Kids today see reruns of "The Andy Griffith Show" and probably think life in Mayberry was no more real than what the Clampett family experienced in Beverly Hills. But, for many of us who grew up in the 1950s and '60s, life did imitate art -- we just didn't know it at the time.A friend sent me this list of remembrances that kids today just might not believe existed except in a TV sitcom.Being sent to the drugstore to test vacuum tubes for the TV or radio.When Kool-Aid was the only drink for kids, other than milk and sodas.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 28, 1996
Host Marriott Corp. yesterday raised $415 million through a secondary stock offering, capital the Bethesda-based company will use to further its 2-year-old strategy of acquiring upscale hotels.Host Marriott, which has invested $915 million to buy 27 full-service lodging properties since early 1994, now owns 93 projects.The company told the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission of its intent to sell the stock in January. Yesterday's sale involved 31.6 million shares at $13.12 per share.Host Marriott, which went public in October 1993 in conjunction with a division of the former Marriott Corp.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1994
NEW YORK -- Seeking to prevent wholesale defections at Kidder Peabody & Co., the PaineWebber Group Inc. sued two rivals yesterday, accusing them of offering "exorbitant" financial incentives to lure Kidder's top brokers away before PaineWebber completed its takeover of Kidder.In separate lawsuits, filed in New York City and Chicago, PaineWebber contended that the recent hiring of Kidder brokers by Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Inc. and Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. constituted a raid that could jeopardize its deal to buy Kidder from General Electric Co. for $670 million in stock.
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