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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 23, 1996
In a sweltering studio in Little Italy, Susan Luery hears the great public debate about Cal Ripken and tenderly strokes Ripken's hand. The Orioles may wish to move their all-star shortstop to third base occasionally. Luery reaches out to knead Cal's shoulders. Ripken seems to have misgivings about the move. Luery, 5 feet tall, wraps her fingers around Cal's neck. Ripken is 27 inches tall.Only months ago, Luery knew nothing about baseball. When she met Reggie Jackson and heard he was called Mr. October, she assumed he'd posed for a calendar.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
When Susan Luery competed for the right to sculpt the Babe Ruth statue at Camden Yards, she didn't know much about pro baseball and had never been to a game. Just before earning the commission, she met Hall of Fame player Reggie Jackson and was later told that he was nicknamed "Mr. October." "What calendar does he pose for?" she asked. Yet by the time the16-foot Babe's Dream was unveiled in 1998, Luery had researched his life and persona, and could even recite his baseball stats. A former Northwest Baltimore resident who now lives in Hingham, Mass.
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NEWS
April 25, 1996
Because of incorrect information supplied to a reporter, the name of Susan Luery, the artist working on a statue to stand outside the Ripken Museum in Aberdeen, was misspelled in yesterday's editions. Also, the statue is being paid for by a private group, not the artist.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 4/25/96
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 23, 1996
In a sweltering studio in Little Italy, Susan Luery hears the great public debate about Cal Ripken and tenderly strokes Ripken's hand. The Orioles may wish to move their all-star shortstop to third base occasionally. Luery reaches out to knead Cal's shoulders. Ripken seems to have misgivings about the move. Luery, 5 feet tall, wraps her fingers around Cal's neck. Ripken is 27 inches tall.Only months ago, Luery knew nothing about baseball. When she met Reggie Jackson and heard he was called Mr. October, she assumed he'd posed for a calendar.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
It might seem like a big leap from tropical plant huckster to professional matchmaker, but for Joe Luery, there are similar considerations to making a go of either business.For one, you have to keep in mind that "people are looking for perfection," he says.And whether it's paying for a fancy ficus tree for an office or a night on the town with Prince Charming, people today are "very cost conscious," he says.Mr. Luery has tried to keep both principals in mind in launching his new venture, a matchmaker service for heterosexual adults named -- no joke -- The Hunt Club.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | December 20, 1993
It's not easy posing for a statue when you're seven years old and 15 minutes seems like forever."It's hard when you have to stand still," said Brandi Vest, a model for Park Elementary School's sculpture, "Friendship," depicting a boy and girl holding hands. She and another girl, Sarah Schultz, share duty as models of the girl.But lest one should think it's all hard work, Brandi said, it isn't. "It's fun because you can do stuff. You can get to stand on the table," the second-grader said.Susan Luery, a Baltimore-born sculptor in the state's artist-in-residence program, is re-creating Brandi's likeness, along with fellow student Marty Jameson, in terra cotta clay at the Brooklyn Park school.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1995
During the many months of modeling and molding it took to create her 9-foot, 800-pound Babe Ruth in bronze, artist Susan Luery met countless experts and aficionados.Through her studio they would traipse, bringing ideas and leaving suggestions. Details were researched and debated. Did the Babe wear his belt buckle on the left or right? Was his hat cocked to the side or worn straight?No fact was too small to escape scrutiny. Except one.The bronze Babe, unveiled last month at the northern Eutaw Street entrance of Oriole Park, is leaning on a bat and clutching on his hip a right-handed fielder's glove.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 12, 1995
At her first baseball game, Susan Luery was taken into the Orioles press box, where she saw a muscular fellow named Reggie Jackson, the retired slugger dubbed Mr. October for his legendary World Series heroics."
FEATURES
By David J. Williams and David J. Williams,Special to The Sun | June 3, 1994
Next year, an 18-foot-tall bronze statue of Babe Ruth will stand before Oriole Park at Camden Yards, only two blocks from the house where the baseball legend was born.Although the statue won't be unveiled until Feb. 6, 1995, Ruth's 100th birthday, it is said to portray a young Ruth leaning on a bat, glove held at his hip, with a self-assured grin on his face. With Ruth's birthplace to his back, he gazes upon the ballpark. Its sculptor creator, Susan Luery, says the design portrays "a man looking at his destiny."
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
When Susan Luery competed for the right to sculpt the Babe Ruth statue at Camden Yards, she didn't know much about pro baseball and had never been to a game. Just before earning the commission, she met Hall of Fame player Reggie Jackson and was later told that he was nicknamed "Mr. October." "What calendar does he pose for?" she asked. Yet by the time the16-foot Babe's Dream was unveiled in 1998, Luery had researched his life and persona, and could even recite his baseball stats. A former Northwest Baltimore resident who now lives in Hingham, Mass.
NEWS
April 25, 1996
Because of incorrect information supplied to a reporter, the name of Susan Luery, the artist working on a statue to stand outside the Ripken Museum in Aberdeen, was misspelled in yesterday's editions. Also, the statue is being paid for by a private group, not the artist.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 4/25/96
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1995
During the many months of modeling and molding it took to create her 9-foot, 800-pound Babe Ruth in bronze, artist Susan Luery met countless experts and aficionados.Through her studio they would traipse, bringing ideas and leaving suggestions. Details were researched and debated. Did the Babe wear his belt buckle on the left or right? Was his hat cocked to the side or worn straight?No fact was too small to escape scrutiny. Except one.The bronze Babe, unveiled last month at the northern Eutaw Street entrance of Oriole Park, is leaning on a bat and clutching on his hip a right-handed fielder's glove.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 12, 1995
At her first baseball game, Susan Luery was taken into the Orioles press box, where she saw a muscular fellow named Reggie Jackson, the retired slugger dubbed Mr. October for his legendary World Series heroics."
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 22, 1994
Bringing Babe Ruth to life in bronze has been the endeavor of Susan Luery, a sculptor who is about to unveil a quarter-size likeness of a monument that is to be enhanced to a height of 9 feet and be unveiled Feb. 6, on the 100th birthday of Baltimore's most famous son.In fact, a blue-ribbon jury of evaluators, including educators and historians, for Life magazine named the baseball immortal among the "100 most important Americans of this century."The effort to honor Ruth is all but completed.
FEATURES
By David J. Williams and David J. Williams,Special to The Sun | June 3, 1994
Next year, an 18-foot-tall bronze statue of Babe Ruth will stand before Oriole Park at Camden Yards, only two blocks from the house where the baseball legend was born.Although the statue won't be unveiled until Feb. 6, 1995, Ruth's 100th birthday, it is said to portray a young Ruth leaning on a bat, glove held at his hip, with a self-assured grin on his face. With Ruth's birthplace to his back, he gazes upon the ballpark. Its sculptor creator, Susan Luery, says the design portrays "a man looking at his destiny."
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
It might seem like a big leap from tropical plant huckster to professional matchmaker, but for Joe Luery, there are similar considerations to making a go of either business.For one, you have to keep in mind that "people are looking for perfection," he says.And whether it's paying for a fancy ficus tree for an office or a night on the town with Prince Charming, people today are "very cost conscious," he says.Mr. Luery has tried to keep both principals in mind in launching his new venture, a matchmaker service for heterosexual adults named -- no joke -- The Hunt Club.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 22, 1994
Bringing Babe Ruth to life in bronze has been the endeavor of Susan Luery, a sculptor who is about to unveil a quarter-size likeness of a monument that is to be enhanced to a height of 9 feet and be unveiled Feb. 6, on the 100th birthday of Baltimore's most famous son.In fact, a blue-ribbon jury of evaluators, including educators and historians, for Life magazine named the baseball immortal among the "100 most important Americans of this century."The effort to honor Ruth is all but completed.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 21, 1992
Retired in June after 42 years in the Baltimore County school system, Marian Capozzi Drach has no complaints.She isn't bitter about school pay, or angry about donated time and materials, or feeling used for her desire to help children learn. In fact, she says, she's grateful to have had the chance to work all that time at something she liked.That's why she's spending all of her retirement incentive money -- and then some -- to have a life-size bronze statue of a woman and a child sharing a book installed on the old courthouse lawn in Towson.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | December 20, 1993
It's not easy posing for a statue when you're seven years old and 15 minutes seems like forever."It's hard when you have to stand still," said Brandi Vest, a model for Park Elementary School's sculpture, "Friendship," depicting a boy and girl holding hands. She and another girl, Sarah Schultz, share duty as models of the girl.But lest one should think it's all hard work, Brandi said, it isn't. "It's fun because you can do stuff. You can get to stand on the table," the second-grader said.Susan Luery, a Baltimore-born sculptor in the state's artist-in-residence program, is re-creating Brandi's likeness, along with fellow student Marty Jameson, in terra cotta clay at the Brooklyn Park school.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | July 21, 1993
No longer is it mere discussion or contemplation. A statue, commemorating native son Babe Ruth's momentous contributions to baseball, is planned for a highly visible location near where he lived and played as a child. Appropriately, it's to be placed in close proximity to Oriole Park at Camden Yards and home run distance to where he was actually born.The Baltimore Orioles, the Babe Ruth Museum and the city have endorsed the idea. A tentative site has been selected, a sculptor commissioned and even a projected date outlined for its completion, the 100th anniversary of Ruth's birth, which is to be celebrated in 1995.
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