Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLudwig Van Beethoven
IN THE NEWS

Ludwig Van Beethoven

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
December 16, 2005
Dec. 16--1770: Composer Ludwig van Beethoven was born. 1809: Napoleon Bonaparte was divorced from the Empress Josephine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 9, 2014
The Columbia Orchestra gets to do a lot of big pieces during the season, but it also has a free chamber music concert series that puts the focus on smaller pieces. Its next chamber concert is on Sunday, Jan. 19, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Orchestral performers really appreciate such opportunities to explore the chamber music repertory. The upcoming concert features the Columbia Orchestra Piano Trio, composed of music director Jason Love on cello, concertmaster Brenda Anna on violin and Nancy Smith on piano.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 22, 2007
When Ludwig van Beethoven's Ninth Symphony rose, Olympus-like, above the musical landscape in 1824, it cast not just a huge shadow, but also -- some otherwise sensible folks soon believed -- a curse. BSO / / Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, conducted by Carlos Kalmar. 8 p.m. Thursday, Music Center at Strathmore; 7:30 p.m. Friday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. $12.50-$30. 410-783-8000 or baltimoresymphony.org.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 22, 2007
When Ludwig van Beethoven's Ninth Symphony rose, Olympus-like, above the musical landscape in 1824, it cast not just a huge shadow, but also -- some otherwise sensible folks soon believed -- a curse. BSO / / Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, conducted by Carlos Kalmar. 8 p.m. Thursday, Music Center at Strathmore; 7:30 p.m. Friday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. $12.50-$30. 410-783-8000 or baltimoresymphony.org.
NEWS
By Dennis Bartel | March 29, 1995
WITH THE success of the movie "Immortal Beloved," Ludwig van Beethoven has re-entered the public consciousness with the same here-now insistence as the two-chord opening of his "Eroica" Symphony.This is good. The music of this early 19th century German son of the Enlightenment is, for many, like aural iron for tired blood. Beethoven gives strength.But just as Beethoven was often misunderstood in life, so he is misunderstood by some now that he has achieved Hollywood afterlife. The great composer's re-appearance has provoked one question about him that I've heard more often than all others: "How could Beethoven compose such great music -- and so much of it -- when he was deaf?"
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | February 12, 1993
There has been much to enjoy this season from Gisele Ben-Dor's Annapolis Symphony Orchestra: a high octane, pedal-to-the-floor "Eroica" Symphony of Beethoven; an exceptionally well-played anthology of arias from Mozart operas and a splendid collaboration with visiting French hornist William Ver Meulen in concertos of Mozart and Richard Strauss.Today and tomorrow at 8 p.m., Ben-Dor brings her Maryland Hall audiences a pair of towering masterpieces from the symphonic repertoire -- the Fourth Symphony of Gustav Mahler and the C-minor Piano Concerto of Ludwig van Beethoven.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 1999
When the musicians of the Annapolis Symphony take the stage this weekend at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts to play the 3rd Symphony of Ludwig van Beethoven, they're sure to take the experience in stride.After all, Beethoven's "Eroica" (Heroic) Symphony has been part of the standard repertory since its first performance at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on April 7, 1805.But how jaws must have dropped when those Viennese musicians got their first look at the master's monumental score!
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 9, 2014
The Columbia Orchestra gets to do a lot of big pieces during the season, but it also has a free chamber music concert series that puts the focus on smaller pieces. Its next chamber concert is on Sunday, Jan. 19, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Orchestral performers really appreciate such opportunities to explore the chamber music repertory. The upcoming concert features the Columbia Orchestra Piano Trio, composed of music director Jason Love on cello, concertmaster Brenda Anna on violin and Nancy Smith on piano.
FEATURES
March 26, 2001
Today in history: March 26 In 1827, composer Ludwig van Beethoven died in Vienna. In 1875, poet Robert Frost was born in San Francisco. In 1892, poet Walt Whitman died in Camden, N.J. In 1911, playwright Tennessee Williams was born in Columbus, Miss. In 1982, groundbreaking ceremonies took place in Washington, D.C., for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. One year ago: "American Beauty" won five Oscars, including best picture; its leading man, Kevin Spacey, won best actor, while Hilary Swank won the Oscar for best actress for "Boys Don't Cry."
NEWS
May 17, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/ * What's the scientific name for Monarch butterflies? * To which era of music does Frederick Chopin belong? * What's the value of the beads in the upper deck of an abacus? BUG OUT The whole world is bugging out. There are millions of busy, crawling, munching creatures all over the planet, so you may as well get in on the invasion. Buzz over to www.insecta-inspecta.com and join the cyber-colony of insect maniacs.
FEATURES
December 16, 2005
Dec. 16--1770: Composer Ludwig van Beethoven was born. 1809: Napoleon Bonaparte was divorced from the Empress Josephine.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 1999
When the musicians of the Annapolis Symphony take the stage this weekend at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts to play the 3rd Symphony of Ludwig van Beethoven, they're sure to take the experience in stride.After all, Beethoven's "Eroica" (Heroic) Symphony has been part of the standard repertory since its first performance at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on April 7, 1805.But how jaws must have dropped when those Viennese musicians got their first look at the master's monumental score!
NEWS
By Dennis Bartel | March 29, 1995
WITH THE success of the movie "Immortal Beloved," Ludwig van Beethoven has re-entered the public consciousness with the same here-now insistence as the two-chord opening of his "Eroica" Symphony.This is good. The music of this early 19th century German son of the Enlightenment is, for many, like aural iron for tired blood. Beethoven gives strength.But just as Beethoven was often misunderstood in life, so he is misunderstood by some now that he has achieved Hollywood afterlife. The great composer's re-appearance has provoked one question about him that I've heard more often than all others: "How could Beethoven compose such great music -- and so much of it -- when he was deaf?"
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | February 12, 1993
There has been much to enjoy this season from Gisele Ben-Dor's Annapolis Symphony Orchestra: a high octane, pedal-to-the-floor "Eroica" Symphony of Beethoven; an exceptionally well-played anthology of arias from Mozart operas and a splendid collaboration with visiting French hornist William Ver Meulen in concertos of Mozart and Richard Strauss.Today and tomorrow at 8 p.m., Ben-Dor brings her Maryland Hall audiences a pair of towering masterpieces from the symphonic repertoire -- the Fourth Symphony of Gustav Mahler and the C-minor Piano Concerto of Ludwig van Beethoven.
NEWS
July 25, 2001
Beethoven performance set at Pascal Senior Center Annapolis actor Ted Brown will portray composer Ludwig van Beethoven at 1 p.m. Tuesday at Pascal Senior Center, 125 Dorsey Road, Glen Burnie. Brown will perform selections from some of Beethoven's most famous compositions, including portions of his Ninth Symphony and the "Moonlight Sonata." Brown has portrayed other historical figures, including composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and artists Pablo Picasso and Claude Monet. The performance is free for senior center members.
NEWS
November 13, 1999
Thomas Hughes Jukes, 93, a scientist and nutritionist who argued for pesticides, died of pneumonia Nov. 1 in Berkeley, Calif.The British-born research biochemist emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley wrote the first report saying that the vitamin niacin cured pellagra, a nutritional disease. He also was part of the group that isolated and synthesized folic acid.Mr. Jukes took on his fellow Sierra Club members when he argued against banning the pesticide DDT, saying it saved lives in poor countries because it was a cheap, effective way to kill malarial mosquitoes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.