Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLucinda Williams
IN THE NEWS

Lucinda Williams

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | October 14, 2008
Little Honey Lost Highway Records *** cds The roots-rock queen of heartbreak has finally found her sweet spot. On Little Honey, the ninth studio album from Lucinda Williams, the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter counterbalances tales of bitter love with songs of newfound bliss. The former approach is her forte, but the latter isn't very convincing. That doesn't mean that the happy tunes, partly inspired by her romance with her manager-fiance Tom Overby, are a bust. They're just not as affecting or as nuanced as her melancholic cuts, making Little Honey uneven.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
A traveling EDM festival might have seemed like a far-fetched notion, but Live Nation's IDentity is returning this year, with a show planned at Jiffy Lube Live again. The festival, which last year attracted big-timer Kaskade, back when when he didn't headline arenas, and Hercules and Love Affair, consists of genre stars - this year it's Wolfgang Gartner, Nero, and Paul Van Dyk, among others - taking turns at the turntables for several hours before an arena crowd. Kaskade, presumably, was busy with his own arena tour . Live Nation did not disclose last year's attendance numbers with Billboard, which ran the press release . Nice detail: "IDENTITY's sponsors include Rockstar Energy Drink, Emazing Lights, Slurpee, TIGI Bedhead, and Lifestyle Condoms.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 6, 1999
If you were to look up the term "critics' darling" in the dictionary, odds are you'd find a photo of Lucinda Williams.A singer and songwriter whose specialty is literate, emotionally charged country rock, Williams (who performs at Shriver Hall Sunday) has been making records for just over two decades now. Not that the average pop fan would know; of the six albums she's recorded, only one -- last year's "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road" -- ever cracked the Billboard album chart.In fact, the closest she ever came to making a dent in the mainstream was in 1993, when Mary Chapin Carpenter cut a version of her song "Passionate Kisses."
NEWS
By Tim Swift | September 27, 2009
EXHIBIT 'Da Vinci - The Genius': Most know Leonardo Da Vinci as a visionary artist, but he wasn't a bad engineer either. This new show - making its East Coast debut - features more than 65 re-creations of Da Vinci's groundbreaking inventions along with a scientific examination of "The Mona Lisa." Opens Saturday at the Maryland Science Center. Web: mdsci.org DVD 'Away We Go': Where do you settle down when you have no roots? That's the challenge of a couple (John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph, above)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,McClatchy-Tribune | February 8, 2007
Most musicians would sooner give you their house keys and credit card numbers than talk about their private lives. Lucinda Williams talks about little else. An interview with Williams has a shrink-couch intimacy, full of disclosures that threaten to blur any line between art and life. "Art is about self-expression," the singer says. "My songs reflect where I am in my life. It's like writing a journal. I have to do it. Otherwise I'll die." Some listeners think she sounds like she's dying right in the songs.
FEATURES
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,NEWSDAY | June 5, 2001
The figurative matchup is nothing new. In the far corner, wearing the red power tie and navy pin-striped suit stuffed with cash: The Establishment. In the near corner, wearing the cowboy hat, black tank top, faded jeans and boots that will kick your behind from here to Nashville and back: Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Lucinda Williams. Until Williams began work on her new CD, "Essence," her only jabs at the music industry were verbal ones. But as the much-anticipated follow-up to 1998's "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road" hits stores today, Williams has found a new love in boxing and is ready to come out swinging at anyone who has a problem with strong women.
FEATURES
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
AUSTIN, Texas - Lucinda Williams is apologizing - in her own way. "I'm torn," she tells a packed Austin Music Hall. "What do I do? I'm trying to introduce y'all to some new material. If we had two hours, we'd play the new stuff and the old. But we don't." At this point in her recent showcase at the South by Southwest Music Conference, she has played "Drunken Angel" from her classic Car Wheels on a Gravel Road and followed it with seven new songs from World Without Tears, her latest album.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | February 18, 2007
Most musicians would sooner give you their house keys and credit card numbers than talk about their private lives. Lucinda Williams talks about little else. An interview with Williams has a shrink-couch intimacy, full of disclosures that threaten to blur any line between art and life. "Art is about self-expression," the singer says. "My songs reflect where I am in my life. It's like writing a journal. I have to do it. Otherwise I'll die." Some listeners think she sounds like she's dying right in the songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2005
Anger Management / Nissan Pavilion Rap titans Eminem and 50 Cent headline Anger Management Tour 3 tomorrow night at Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge, 7800 Cellar Door Drive in Bristow, Va. Show starts at 7, and tickets, $54-$83, are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting www.ticketmaster.com Sunday in the Country / Merriweather Country stars Jo Dee Messina, Keith Urban and Sugarland will lead the WPOC Sunday in the Country show at Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia, Sunday beginning at noon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 13, 1992
HARD TO WET, EASY TO DRYMad Cobra (Columbia 52751)Dance hall reggae has always depended on repetition to make its point, from the clockwork regularity of its clanking, mechanical pulse, to the lilting, singsong cadences of the dance hall MCs. Even so, few performers ever manage to make that repetition seem as totally hypnotic as Mad Cobra does with "Hard to Wet, Easy to Dry." Of course, it helps that he has a first-rate rhythm machine behind him, cranking out a steady stream of near-irresistible grooves.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | October 14, 2008
Little Honey Lost Highway Records *** cds The roots-rock queen of heartbreak has finally found her sweet spot. On Little Honey, the ninth studio album from Lucinda Williams, the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter counterbalances tales of bitter love with songs of newfound bliss. The former approach is her forte, but the latter isn't very convincing. That doesn't mean that the happy tunes, partly inspired by her romance with her manager-fiance Tom Overby, are a bust. They're just not as affecting or as nuanced as her melancholic cuts, making Little Honey uneven.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | February 18, 2007
Most musicians would sooner give you their house keys and credit card numbers than talk about their private lives. Lucinda Williams talks about little else. An interview with Williams has a shrink-couch intimacy, full of disclosures that threaten to blur any line between art and life. "Art is about self-expression," the singer says. "My songs reflect where I am in my life. It's like writing a journal. I have to do it. Otherwise I'll die." Some listeners think she sounds like she's dying right in the songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,McClatchy-Tribune | February 8, 2007
Most musicians would sooner give you their house keys and credit card numbers than talk about their private lives. Lucinda Williams talks about little else. An interview with Williams has a shrink-couch intimacy, full of disclosures that threaten to blur any line between art and life. "Art is about self-expression," the singer says. "My songs reflect where I am in my life. It's like writing a journal. I have to do it. Otherwise I'll die." Some listeners think she sounds like she's dying right in the songs.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | January 3, 2007
The tapes saved him. When his wife died, Rob Sheffield found comfort in the drawers filled with clothes that carried her scent, in the beagle they had adopted together, and in the trails they had walked for miles. But it was the tapes -- hundreds of mix tapes they had made each other through five years of marriage -- that meant the most. "My mix tapes were the life rafts that I held on to," Sheffield writes in his new book, Love Is a Mix Tape. "Sometimes I would sing to Renee; sometimes I would let her sing to me."
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 2005
It would seem difficult to do with so much going on: the rehearsals, the shows, the crowds. But while she's on the road, Lucinda Williams, one of the most critically lauded songwriters around, tries to carve out time to write. "Being on the road - it's exhausting," says the bluesy country-folk artist, who's calling from a tour stop in New Mexico. "It can be very rewarding. I have my days off. I live on my bus, my home on wheels. I got it fixed up pretty nice." On her luxury bus, the Louisiana-born artist, 52, finds the quiet time to concentrate on lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2005
Anger Management / Nissan Pavilion Rap titans Eminem and 50 Cent headline Anger Management Tour 3 tomorrow night at Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge, 7800 Cellar Door Drive in Bristow, Va. Show starts at 7, and tickets, $54-$83, are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting www.ticketmaster.com Sunday in the Country / Merriweather Country stars Jo Dee Messina, Keith Urban and Sugarland will lead the WPOC Sunday in the Country show at Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia, Sunday beginning at noon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 2005
It would seem difficult to do with so much going on: the rehearsals, the shows, the crowds. But while she's on the road, Lucinda Williams, one of the most critically lauded songwriters around, tries to carve out time to write. "Being on the road - it's exhausting," says the bluesy country-folk artist, who's calling from a tour stop in New Mexico. "It can be very rewarding. I have my days off. I live on my bus, my home on wheels. I got it fixed up pretty nice." On her luxury bus, the Louisiana-born artist, 52, finds the quiet time to concentrate on lyrics.
FEATURES
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
AUSTIN, Texas - Lucinda Williams is apologizing - in her own way. "I'm torn," she tells a packed Austin Music Hall. "What do I do? I'm trying to introduce y'all to some new material. If we had two hours, we'd play the new stuff and the old. But we don't." At this point in her recent showcase at the South by Southwest Music Conference, she has played "Drunken Angel" from her classic Car Wheels on a Gravel Road and followed it with seven new songs from World Without Tears, her latest album.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.