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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Ball of Fire: The Tumultuous Life and Comic Art of Lucille Ball, by Stefan Kanfer. Knopf. 384 pages. $25.95. For decades, the list of successful Hollywood comediennes began and ended with Lucille Ball. A one-time Goldwyn Girl (a group of attractive, long-limbed dancers used as cinematic window dressing during the 1930s and '40s by producer Samuel Goldwyn), Ball knocked around various Hollywood studio lots for years, eking out a living and generally serving as the best thing in bad pictures, before finding her niche in the early days of television.
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By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Hello. My name is Tim. And I'm an "I Love Lucy"-holic. Think less of me, if you must. It won't bother me. I have no intention of ever being cured, even if it means lifelong membership in The Friends of the Friendless (a "Lucy" reference, of course). It all started when I was a little boy (sorry, another "Lucy" reference). I discovered the greatest sitcom ever made - please, "Seinfeld" fans, do not even try - and that was that. Thanks to omnipresent reruns on Channel 5 in Washington, I would catch the show after school, after dinner, whenever.
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By Jill Schensul and By Jill Schensul,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2001
The pizza oven broke down just before the pizza party. The guy with the wine forgot to show up for the wine tasting. And the tour bus got hit by an errant motorcycle. Is this any way to run a Lucy Birthday Celebration? What do you think? If you've ever seen an I Love Lucy episode (and who hasn't?), you know Lucy thrived on disaster. She was at her best in a bad situation. When the candy conveyor belt went a little too fast, the walk-in freezer door closed and locked her in, or she'd had just a little too much Vitameatavegamin, Lucy made us love her. Because Lucy -- be it Lucille Ball or Lucy Ricardo -- had heart.
FEATURES
April 24, 2006
Lucille Ball (above) is the subject of the PBS American Masters profile Lucille Ball: Finding Lucy (10 p.m.-11:30 p.m., WETA, Channel 26).
FEATURES
April 24, 2006
Lucille Ball (above) is the subject of the PBS American Masters profile Lucille Ball: Finding Lucy (10 p.m.-11:30 p.m., WETA, Channel 26).
FEATURES
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- "She Made It: Women Creating Television and Radio," an ambitious three-year initiative of the Museum of Television & Radio, officially launches Thursday with the announcement of the 2005 honorees -- 50 women who were pioneers in broadcasting fields. Among them are Marlo Thomas (who is also co-chair of the initiative), Barbara Walters, Gertrude Berg, Ida Lupino, Sarah Jessica Parker, Lucille Ball, Agnes Nixon, Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric and Oprah Winfrey. "It is a way to look at the history of radio and television, but in a different way," says museum curator Ron Simon.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
The images portray women old and young. Some have strong bodies, but all have strong spirits and loud voices. A group of Anne Arundel County middle-schoolers has chronicled the achievements of women in politics, business, sports, entertainment and art and their impact on our society in more than 40 posters and essays in honor of Women's History Month. The posters will be on display in the Arundel Center until the end of the week. The Anne Arundel County Commission for Women invited the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders - girls and boys - to depict women they admire based on the theme "Women Are Changing America, Everyday."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 23, 2002
The 54th Annual Emmy Awards certainly didn't have the kind of magic or resonance that the Oscar telecast did in April with its long overdue celebration of African-American achievement, but you have to admit it was nice to see longevity rewarded the way it was last night. From Ray Romano, Doris Roberts and Brad Garrett of Everybody Loves Raymond finally getting some industry acclaim, to Friends winning for best comedy and Jennifer Aniston winning best comedy actress, it was the year of the long-distance runners in comedy awards.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
I will be traveling to Florida with my 20-year-old autistic son and have heard that there are locations in Florida that offer "swimming with the dolphins." Can you provide information?Several programs in Florida bring disabled children and dolphins together. Among the goals are improving motivation, outlook and self-esteem by providing an experience that is fun and rewarding.For a child to be properly placed, those running the programs emphasize, specific needs and abilities must be assessed.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 23, 2005
Back in 1968, audiences delighted in seeing beloved film veterans Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball play newlyweds with 18 kids between them. Watching them trying to manage such a big, unruly brood made for a lot of grins and a fine, family-friendly night at the movies. It also served as an inspiration for TV's The Brady Bunch. The 2005 remake of Yours, Mine and Ours proves one thing beyond dispute: Dennis Quaid and Rene Russo are not Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball. No disrespect to Quaid or Russo, fine actors both.
FEATURES
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- "She Made It: Women Creating Television and Radio," an ambitious three-year initiative of the Museum of Television & Radio, officially launches Thursday with the announcement of the 2005 honorees -- 50 women who were pioneers in broadcasting fields. Among them are Marlo Thomas (who is also co-chair of the initiative), Barbara Walters, Gertrude Berg, Ida Lupino, Sarah Jessica Parker, Lucille Ball, Agnes Nixon, Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric and Oprah Winfrey. "It is a way to look at the history of radio and television, but in a different way," says museum curator Ron Simon.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 23, 2005
Back in 1968, audiences delighted in seeing beloved film veterans Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball play newlyweds with 18 kids between them. Watching them trying to manage such a big, unruly brood made for a lot of grins and a fine, family-friendly night at the movies. It also served as an inspiration for TV's The Brady Bunch. The 2005 remake of Yours, Mine and Ours proves one thing beyond dispute: Dennis Quaid and Rene Russo are not Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball. No disrespect to Quaid or Russo, fine actors both.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
The images portray women old and young. Some have strong bodies, but all have strong spirits and loud voices. A group of Anne Arundel County middle-schoolers has chronicled the achievements of women in politics, business, sports, entertainment and art and their impact on our society in more than 40 posters and essays in honor of Women's History Month. The posters will be on display in the Arundel Center until the end of the week. The Anne Arundel County Commission for Women invited the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders - girls and boys - to depict women they admire based on the theme "Women Are Changing America, Everyday."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Ball of Fire: The Tumultuous Life and Comic Art of Lucille Ball, by Stefan Kanfer. Knopf. 384 pages. $25.95. For decades, the list of successful Hollywood comediennes began and ended with Lucille Ball. A one-time Goldwyn Girl (a group of attractive, long-limbed dancers used as cinematic window dressing during the 1930s and '40s by producer Samuel Goldwyn), Ball knocked around various Hollywood studio lots for years, eking out a living and generally serving as the best thing in bad pictures, before finding her niche in the early days of television.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 23, 2002
The 54th Annual Emmy Awards certainly didn't have the kind of magic or resonance that the Oscar telecast did in April with its long overdue celebration of African-American achievement, but you have to admit it was nice to see longevity rewarded the way it was last night. From Ray Romano, Doris Roberts and Brad Garrett of Everybody Loves Raymond finally getting some industry acclaim, to Friends winning for best comedy and Jennifer Aniston winning best comedy actress, it was the year of the long-distance runners in comedy awards.
TRAVEL
By Jill Schensul and By Jill Schensul,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2001
The pizza oven broke down just before the pizza party. The guy with the wine forgot to show up for the wine tasting. And the tour bus got hit by an errant motorcycle. Is this any way to run a Lucy Birthday Celebration? What do you think? If you've ever seen an I Love Lucy episode (and who hasn't?), you know Lucy thrived on disaster. She was at her best in a bad situation. When the candy conveyor belt went a little too fast, the walk-in freezer door closed and locked her in, or she'd had just a little too much Vitameatavegamin, Lucy made us love her. Because Lucy -- be it Lucille Ball or Lucy Ricardo -- had heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
Tell John Epperson you're having trouble deciding how to describe his theatrical persona, and he generously offers some choices."It's not mime, but there is a pantomime aspect to what I do, in the sense of miming voices. And some people have called me a clown, which I also agree with -- but a certain kind of clown, such as Lucille Ball."Dance is involved, too, and certainly music (from early piano training and more recently work as a rehearsal musician at American Ballet Theatre)."Then some people have called me a drag queen, unfortunately.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Hello. My name is Tim. And I'm an "I Love Lucy"-holic. Think less of me, if you must. It won't bother me. I have no intention of ever being cured, even if it means lifelong membership in The Friends of the Friendless (a "Lucy" reference, of course). It all started when I was a little boy (sorry, another "Lucy" reference). I discovered the greatest sitcom ever made - please, "Seinfeld" fans, do not even try - and that was that. Thanks to omnipresent reruns on Channel 5 in Washington, I would catch the show after school, after dinner, whenever.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
The "I Love Lucy" wreath - spray-painted pink and white, and decorated with tiny framed photos of loud-mouthed comedian Lucille Ball - screamed: "Ricky!" Created by the father-daughter team of George and Lauren Capone, the wreath was one of the extravagant holiday scenes on display yesterday as part of the Kennedy Krieger Institute's 11th Annual Festival of Trees at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. "It was the best reason for us to be together and to be working on it together, because it would hopefully raise some money for the institute and make someone happy," said George Capone, 46, of Rodgers Forge.
NEWS
December 24, 1997
Is this how we prepare kids for MSPAP?I am writing in regard to your article, "Students working lunch." The students began lunch with instructions regarding the relationship between a cup and a saucer. The students were asked by the teacher: ''What does the cup do for the saucer?'' Then the teacher supplied the answer: ''It supports it."Analogies are used on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program to test students' ability to reason and discern relationships between items. In this case, the students were given an illogical answer and led to believe that the answer demonstrated a true and logical relationship.
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