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Luciano Pavarotti

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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | September 6, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti, who possessed one of the most radiant tenor voices to be heard in the past hundred years and who enjoyed a level of popularity unequaled since the legendary Enrico Caruso, died early today in his hometown of Modena, Italy. He was 71. Mr. Pavarotti was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year and underwent surgery in July 2006. Last month, he was admitted to a Modena hospital, reportedly with a fever. After about three weeks of tests and treatment, the singer returned to his home, where he was cared for by local doctors, according to Italian news reports.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Berean E. "Bill" Talbert, who founded a Baltimore County landscaping company and fought in Europe during World War II, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Richard H. Talbert, a textile mill worker, and Stella M. Talbert, a homemaker, Berean Earl Talbert was born and raised in Leaksville, N.C., which is now Eden, N.C. He was a 1937 graduate of Leaksville High School. During World War II, Mr. Talbert served with Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army in Europe, where he was a fire control director with a Howitzer artillery unit.
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NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 9, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti was laid to rest yesterday, and, with his passing, an incredible chapter in operatic history came to a close. Bono, frontman of the rock group U2 and one of the many pop stars who collaborated with the charismatic tenor in large-scale concerts, said it well last week: "Some can sing opera - Luciano Pavarotti was an opera." Larger-than-life describes the man, physically and musically. A godsend to gossip columnists and TV chat show hosts, not just music journalists, he had everything needed for celebrity status - and quite a bit more.
NEWS
By Michelle Quinn and Michelle Quinn,Los Angeles Times | June 29, 2008
Questions posed to presidential hopefuls reflect their times. Remember the famous one for Bill Clinton during the Rock the Vote forum - boxers or briefs? In the latest example, Rolling Stone asked Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama to disclose the contents of his iPod. He described his musical tastes as "old school." "If I had one musical hero, it would have to be Stevie Wonder," he told the magazine. Also on the senator's iPod: Jay-Z, Howlin Wolf, Yo-Yo Ma and Sheryl Crow.
NEWS
February 15, 1998
Louise Sherman, 61, a vocal coach, died of cancer Wednesday in Denver. An assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera for 20 years, she served as a vocal coach for stars including Luciano Pavarotti, Beverly Sills and Joan Sutherland.Pub Date: 2/15/98
NEWS
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,special to the sun | September 29, 1996
"Luciano Pavarotti: The Myth of the Tenor," by Jurgen Kesting, translated by Susan H. Ray. Northeastern University Press. 237 pages. $24.95.Missed out on Pavarotti this year? Probably not. Even if you weren't checking out his highly publicized high-C batting average at the Metropolitan Opera this past spring, you probably noticed him with his bikini-clad secretary/girlfriend in Newsweek, caught the "Seinfeld" episode with the Three Tenors story line. All these things prove true the starting point of Jurgen Kesting's "Luciano Pavarotti: The Myth of the Tenor": Pavarotti is "no longer famous because of the quality of his singing, but simply because he is so incredibly famous."
NEWS
May 15, 2002
UNDOUBTEDLY, Luciano Pavarotti will sing again. But his last-minute withdrawal from Saturday's appearance at the Metropolitan Opera trumpets the inevitable: The long reign of the "King of the high C's" is over. The Met's general manager, Joseph Volpe, certainly understood the significance of the moment. "This is a hell of a way to end a beautiful career," he reportedly told the tenor, who had flip-flopped for hours about whether to sing. Was Mr. Pavarotti truly too ill to sing before 3,000 spectators, some of whom had paid $1,500 for their tickets?
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | January 26, 1993
BERLIN -- "Was ist los mit Luciano Pavarotti?" cried the caption over the picture of the rotund tenor on the front page of the Berliner Morgenpost. "What's going on with Luciano Pavarotti?""Der Pavarotti-Skandal" hissed the sensationalist Bild, Germany's biggest newspaper."The most brilliant singer on the planet" had stiffed 10,000 fans who had paid from about $45 to more than $150 to hear him sing the tenor part in Guiseppe Verdi's "Requiem Mass" Saturday night in Munich's Olympiahalle.Mr.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 26, 2006
Mario Lanza didn't enjoy a long or critically beatified career, but the movie star tenor sure left a legacy of inspiration. He has been mentioned as a prime influence on the early development of many singers, from pop crooner Al Martino to all of the famed Three Tenors. Baltimore Opera Company presents La Boheme at 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. May 3, 8:15 p.m. May 5 and 6, 3 p.m. May 7 at Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Tickets $50 to $137. Call 410-727-6000 or visit baltimoreopera.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Berean E. "Bill" Talbert, who founded a Baltimore County landscaping company and fought in Europe during World War II, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Richard H. Talbert, a textile mill worker, and Stella M. Talbert, a homemaker, Berean Earl Talbert was born and raised in Leaksville, N.C., which is now Eden, N.C. He was a 1937 graduate of Leaksville High School. During World War II, Mr. Talbert served with Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army in Europe, where he was a fire control director with a Howitzer artillery unit.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 9, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti was laid to rest yesterday, and, with his passing, an incredible chapter in operatic history came to a close. Bono, frontman of the rock group U2 and one of the many pop stars who collaborated with the charismatic tenor in large-scale concerts, said it well last week: "Some can sing opera - Luciano Pavarotti was an opera." Larger-than-life describes the man, physically and musically. A godsend to gossip columnists and TV chat show hosts, not just music journalists, he had everything needed for celebrity status - and quite a bit more.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 8, 2007
In Luciano Pavarotti's foreword to Ponselle: A Singer's Life, published by Doubleday in 1982, he wrote that when he was growing up in Modena, Italy, he could "hardly remember a time when the name Rosa Ponselle was unfamiliar to me." Pavarotti, who died this week, wrote that her recordings "assured her of immortality," and as a young boy alto, he was urged to "listen to them, note by note, one after the other." In the early 1970s, Pavarotti and the great Metropolitan Opera Company diva began a telephone-and-letter friendship that culminated in 1977 when the operatic tenor visited Villa Pace, her Green Spring Valley home.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | September 6, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti, who possessed one of the most radiant tenor voices to be heard in the past hundred years and who enjoyed a level of popularity unequaled since the legendary Enrico Caruso, died early today in his hometown of Modena, Italy. He was 71. Mr. Pavarotti was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year and underwent surgery in July 2006. Last month, he was admitted to a Modena hospital, reportedly with a fever. After about three weeks of tests and treatment, the singer returned to his home, where he was cared for by local doctors, according to Italian news reports.
NEWS
June 15, 2006
Rosemary M. Malooly, a homemaker and longtime Parkville resident, died Monday of complications from a stroke at her daughter's Homeland residence. She was 92. Rosemary Murphy was born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue. She was a graduate of the parish school of St. Martin Roman Catholic Church and attended the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. In 1942, she married William Francis Malooly and settled in Parkville, where she raised her family and lived the remainder of her life.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 26, 2006
Mario Lanza didn't enjoy a long or critically beatified career, but the movie star tenor sure left a legacy of inspiration. He has been mentioned as a prime influence on the early development of many singers, from pop crooner Al Martino to all of the famed Three Tenors. Baltimore Opera Company presents La Boheme at 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. May 3, 8:15 p.m. May 5 and 6, 3 p.m. May 7 at Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Tickets $50 to $137. Call 410-727-6000 or visit baltimoreopera.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
UNDOUBTEDLY, Luciano Pavarotti will sing again. But his last-minute withdrawal from Saturday's appearance at the Metropolitan Opera trumpets the inevitable: The long reign of the "King of the high C's" is over. The Met's general manager, Joseph Volpe, certainly understood the significance of the moment. "This is a hell of a way to end a beautiful career," he reportedly told the tenor, who had flip-flopped for hours about whether to sing. Was Mr. Pavarotti truly too ill to sing before 3,000 spectators, some of whom had paid $1,500 for their tickets?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 26, 1994
THE THREE TENORS IN CONCERT, 1994Jose Carreras, Placido Domingo and Luciano Pavarotti (Atlantic 82614)In a way, it's fitting that the reunion performance of Jose Carreras, Placido Domingo and Luciano Pavarotti was broadcast live from Dodgers Stadium. Because as "The Three Tenors in Concert, 1994" makes plain, this particular spectacle had more in common with athletic events than with any kind of concert. Tremble as Pavarotti brings nail-biting suspense to the high notes in "Nessun Dorma"!
NEWS
June 25, 1993
Crowning touch Opera tenor Luciano Pavarotti made a trip to a Newark, N.J., hospital Wednesday, but he wasn't worried about his health. He helped dedicate a $25 million hospital wing named in his honor.The Luciano Pavarotti Pavilion at Columbus Hospital features surgical services and maternal-child health units. The Italian star, who is preparing for a concert in New York's Central Park this weekend, performed a benefit concert for the hospital in 1981.Medicine's origins are all Greek to himGreece granted citizenship yesterday to Dr. Christiaan N. Barnard, the South African surgeon who performed the world's first human heart transplant.
NEWS
February 15, 1998
Louise Sherman, 61, a vocal coach, died of cancer Wednesday in Denver. An assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera for 20 years, she served as a vocal coach for stars including Luciano Pavarotti, Beverly Sills and Joan Sutherland.Pub Date: 2/15/98
NEWS
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,special to the sun | September 29, 1996
"Luciano Pavarotti: The Myth of the Tenor," by Jurgen Kesting, translated by Susan H. Ray. Northeastern University Press. 237 pages. $24.95.Missed out on Pavarotti this year? Probably not. Even if you weren't checking out his highly publicized high-C batting average at the Metropolitan Opera this past spring, you probably noticed him with his bikini-clad secretary/girlfriend in Newsweek, caught the "Seinfeld" episode with the Three Tenors story line. All these things prove true the starting point of Jurgen Kesting's "Luciano Pavarotti: The Myth of the Tenor": Pavarotti is "no longer famous because of the quality of his singing, but simply because he is so incredibly famous."
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