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By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2005
The trial is almost too painful for the teacher to bear. Still, Tasha Gardner sits on a bench in the downtown Baltimore courtroom, wiping at tears and trying to understand why anyone would hurt the shy, sweet children who attended Cross Country Elementary School in Northwest Baltimore. Gardner taught Lucero Espinoza's third-grade class. The 8-year-old, along with her 9-year-old brother and their 10-year-old male cousin, were brutally killed May 27, 2004, about a month before school let out for the summer.
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NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
For the second time, a Baltimore jury has been asked to make sense of the May 2004 slashing deaths of three Mexican immigrant children, a brutal crime with no clear motive. Jurors listened to closing arguments yesterday and will begin deliberations this morning. The closing arguments spanned about four hours and were largely a predictable recap - though some new theories were sprinkled throughout. Policarpio Espinoza, 24, and Adan Canela, 19, are charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
Touched by the tragedy, people streamed into Harlem Park Community Baptist Church last night to offer their respects and comfort to the families of three slain Northwest Baltimore children whom most had never even met. Residents of the church's west-side neighborhood stopped by on their way home from work. Others were passers-by whose curiosity brought them to the viewing there. Although few knew the appropriate phrases in the Mexican families' native Spanish that could offer comfort, one by one, they reached to shake the hands of the parents, hoping that a touch alone could communicate their grief.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
Two days before her children's throats were slashed in a Northwest Baltimore apartment, the mother testified yesterday, she suffered a miscarriage and was comforted by both of the accused killers. At the request of her husband, Noemi "Mimi" Espinoza Quezada testified that Policarpio Espinoza, 24, and Adan Canela, 19, visited her just hours after she returned from the hospital in May 2004. Espinoza and Canela are on trial in Baltimore City Circuit Court for the second time, accused of first-degree murder and conspiracy in the deaths of a girl and two boys to whom they are related.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
There were subtle differences - in style, not substance - yesterday as the retrial began in the case of Policarpio Espinoza and Adan Canela, two Mexican immigrants accused of slashing the throats of their three young relatives. Jurors in the trial last summer could not reach a verdict, an outcome that some of them attributed to confusion about the evidence and the lack of a clear motive in such a brutal crime. Lucero Espinoza, 8, her brother, Ricardo Espinoza, 9, and their male cousin, Alexis Espejo Quezada, 10, were killed May 27, 2004, in their bedrooms in the family's Northwest Baltimore apartment.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Ryan Davis and Allison Klein and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2004
Two Mexican immigrants were indicted yesterday by a Baltimore grand jury in the slashing deaths of three young relatives, one of whom was beheaded and the others partially beheaded. Adan Espinoza Canela, 17, and his uncle, Policarpio Espinoza, 22, who were arrested May 28, were each charged with three counts of first-degree murder, three counts of conspiracy to commit murder and three counts of using a deadly weapon. Espinoza was the children's uncle, and Canela was their cousin. The victims, Ricardo Solis Quezada Jr. and his sister, Lucero Solis Quezada, both 9, and their 10-year-old male cousin, Alexis Espejo Quezada, were killed in their Northwest Baltimore apartment May 27. Police say they have not established a motive for the killings.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
A prosecutor began laying the foundation yesterday to introduce what could be bloody gloves found in a car used by the two men on trial in the slashing deaths of three Mexican immigrant children last year in Northwest Baltimore. Policarpio Espinoza, 23, and Adan Canela, 18, are on trial in Baltimore Circuit Court facing three counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy charges in the deaths of Lucero Espinoza, 8, her 9-year- old brother Ricardo Espinoza, and their 10-year-old male cousin Alexis Espejo Quezada.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
Two days before her children's throats were slashed in a Northwest Baltimore apartment, the mother testified yesterday, she suffered a miscarriage and was comforted by both of the accused killers. At the request of her husband, Noemi "Mimi" Espinoza Quezada testified that Policarpio Espinoza, 24, and Adan Canela, 19, visited her just hours after she returned from the hospital in May 2004. Espinoza and Canela are on trial in Baltimore City Circuit Court for the second time, accused of first-degree murder and conspiracy in the deaths of a girl and two boys to whom they are related.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
The mother of a 10-year-old boy who along with his two younger cousins was killed last year in a Northwest Baltimore apartment began testifying yesterday in the trial of two men charged with the murders. Maria Andrea Espejo Quezada, who speaks little English, was visibly upset as a prosecutor questioned her about finding her son's nearly decapitated body May 27, 2004. Quezada referred to the killings as "the accident, the tragedy." The children's uncle, Policarpio Espinoza, 23, and cousin, Adan Canela, 18, are on trial in Baltimore Circuit Court, facing three counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy charges.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis, Stephanie Hanes and Allison Klein and Ryan Davis, Stephanie Hanes and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2004
Two Mexican immigrants who joined relatives grieving for three slain children Thursday night were arrested at the crime scene and charged yesterday with the killings, police said. Baltimore police said last night that they still did not know of a motive for the decapitations - killings so horrific that a Northwest Baltimore neighborhood remained shaken yesterday. But among the theories being explored was revenge over an unpaid debt for transportation into the United States as undocumented immigrants.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
There were subtle differences - in style, not substance - yesterday as the retrial began in the case of Policarpio Espinoza and Adan Canela, two Mexican immigrants accused of slashing the throats of their three young relatives. Jurors in the trial last summer could not reach a verdict, an outcome that some of them attributed to confusion about the evidence and the lack of a clear motive in such a brutal crime. Lucero Espinoza, 8, her brother, Ricardo Espinoza, 9, and their male cousin, Alexis Espejo Quezada, 10, were killed May 27, 2004, in their bedrooms in the family's Northwest Baltimore apartment.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
The 15-year-old brother of a defendant on trial in the slashing deaths of three children testified yesterday that one of the two suspects may have been at home in Baltimore County about the same time police believe the crime occurred in Northwest Baltimore. Jesus Espinoza, who testified as an alibi witness for his brother, Adan Canela, was the final person to take the stand in the five-week-long Baltimore Circuit Court trial. Defense attorneys for Canela and Policarpio Espinoza rested their cases yesterday afternoon, paving the way for jurors to hear closing arguments and begin their deliberations as early as today.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2005
The trial is almost too painful for the teacher to bear. Still, Tasha Gardner sits on a bench in the downtown Baltimore courtroom, wiping at tears and trying to understand why anyone would hurt the shy, sweet children who attended Cross Country Elementary School in Northwest Baltimore. Gardner taught Lucero Espinoza's third-grade class. The 8-year-old, along with her 9-year-old brother and their 10-year-old male cousin, were brutally killed May 27, 2004, about a month before school let out for the summer.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
The mother of a 10-year-old boy who along with his two younger cousins was killed last year in a Northwest Baltimore apartment began testifying yesterday in the trial of two men charged with the murders. Maria Andrea Espejo Quezada, who speaks little English, was visibly upset as a prosecutor questioned her about finding her son's nearly decapitated body May 27, 2004. Quezada referred to the killings as "the accident, the tragedy." The children's uncle, Policarpio Espinoza, 23, and cousin, Adan Canela, 18, are on trial in Baltimore Circuit Court, facing three counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy charges.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
A prosecutor began laying the foundation yesterday to introduce what could be bloody gloves found in a car used by the two men on trial in the slashing deaths of three Mexican immigrant children last year in Northwest Baltimore. Policarpio Espinoza, 23, and Adan Canela, 18, are on trial in Baltimore Circuit Court facing three counts of first-degree murder and conspiracy charges in the deaths of Lucero Espinoza, 8, her 9-year- old brother Ricardo Espinoza, and their 10-year-old male cousin Alexis Espejo Quezada.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Ryan Davis and Allison Klein and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2004
Two Mexican immigrants were indicted yesterday by a Baltimore grand jury in the slashing deaths of three young relatives, one of whom was beheaded and the others partially beheaded. Adan Espinoza Canela, 17, and his uncle, Policarpio Espinoza, 22, who were arrested May 28, were each charged with three counts of first-degree murder, three counts of conspiracy to commit murder and three counts of using a deadly weapon. Espinoza was the children's uncle, and Canela was their cousin. The victims, Ricardo Solis Quezada Jr. and his sister, Lucero Solis Quezada, both 9, and their 10-year-old male cousin, Alexis Espejo Quezada, were killed in their Northwest Baltimore apartment May 27. Police say they have not established a motive for the killings.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
For the second time, a Baltimore jury has been asked to make sense of the May 2004 slashing deaths of three Mexican immigrant children, a brutal crime with no clear motive. Jurors listened to closing arguments yesterday and will begin deliberations this morning. The closing arguments spanned about four hours and were largely a predictable recap - though some new theories were sprinkled throughout. Policarpio Espinoza, 24, and Adan Canela, 19, are charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
The 15-year-old brother of a defendant on trial in the slashing deaths of three children testified yesterday that one of the two suspects may have been at home in Baltimore County about the same time police believe the crime occurred in Northwest Baltimore. Jesus Espinoza, who testified as an alibi witness for his brother, Adan Canela, was the final person to take the stand in the five-week-long Baltimore Circuit Court trial. Defense attorneys for Canela and Policarpio Espinoza rested their cases yesterday afternoon, paving the way for jurors to hear closing arguments and begin their deliberations as early as today.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
Touched by the tragedy, people streamed into Harlem Park Community Baptist Church last night to offer their respects and comfort to the families of three slain Northwest Baltimore children whom most had never even met. Residents of the church's west-side neighborhood stopped by on their way home from work. Others were passers-by whose curiosity brought them to the viewing there. Although few knew the appropriate phrases in the Mexican families' native Spanish that could offer comfort, one by one, they reached to shake the hands of the parents, hoping that a touch alone could communicate their grief.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis, Stephanie Hanes and Allison Klein and Ryan Davis, Stephanie Hanes and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2004
Two Mexican immigrants who joined relatives grieving for three slain children Thursday night were arrested at the crime scene and charged yesterday with the killings, police said. Baltimore police said last night that they still did not know of a motive for the decapitations - killings so horrific that a Northwest Baltimore neighborhood remained shaken yesterday. But among the theories being explored was revenge over an unpaid debt for transportation into the United States as undocumented immigrants.
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