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NEWS
By Jill Hudson and TaNoah Morgan and Jill Hudson and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
Howard and Anne Arundel County police arrested 12 people this week after related drug raids in the two counties yielded 38 pounds of marijuana, 3,700 doses of LSD and more than $3,000 in cash.Police estimates of the street value of the drugs seized were between $140,000 and $190,000.Anne Arundel County police said a search-and-seizure warrant served at a house in the 1100 block of Stoney Run Road in dTC Hanover Tuesday night yielded 3,700 doses of LSD -- that county's largest haul of the drug -- and $3,000.
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2004
A state panel that sets standards for police hiring and training throughout Maryland is considering a proposal that would allow recruits to become police officers even if they had experimented with heroin, LSD and PCP - a move aimed at increasing the pool of applicants for short-staffed departments. The plan, however, is drawing stiff opposition from a broad range of police commanders and union leaders who contend that hiring officers who have used those substances sends the wrong message about the acceptability of criminal behavior.
FEATURES
By A Reader's Guide to Twentieth Century Writers | October 4, 1998
At Stanford University, Ken Kesey became involved with the Beat culture in San Francisco.Kesey's exposure to LSD as well as his time spent as an orderly in a psychiatric hospital inspired him to write "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," a cult classic.He later gave up writing, directed his attention to experimenting with LSD, formed a group of cohorts called the "Merry Pranksters," bought an old bus and traveled across the country distributing LSD in "acid tests." The escapades were recorded in Tom Wolfe's "Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" also a cult classic.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | February 9, 1993
9 students suspended on LSD-related chargesBEL AIR -- Nine Bel Air High School students were suspended and an 18-year-old Baltimore man was arrested on charges of selling them LSD tablets, police said yesterday.Police did not release the man's name, but called him the students' supplier. When arrested, he had 119 LSD tablets, police said.Assistant Principal David Volrath requested the police investigation Friday.Eight boys and one girl between 14 and 16 years of age were suspended. Seven of the nine suspended students had the hallucinogenic drug in their possession, police said.
NEWS
September 13, 1995
A 17-year-old student at South Carroll High School in Winfield was arrested at the school after the alleged sale of LSD attracted the attention of a teacher Monday. State police said the girl was arrested after three doses of the hallucinogenic drug were sold to two students inside the school. After the $15 exchange, the LSD was passed to yet another student who flushed the drug down a toilet.Detective Sgt. Gary Cofflin, regional supervisor of the state police drug enforcement division, said the alleged seller and two buyers were taken to the principal's office and a search of the 17-year-old girl's books revealed marijuana and cocaine, plus a mirror and a razor blade, paraphernalia used in the dealing of drugs.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | March 28, 1994
Toni Brown of Brooklyn, N.Y., figures it was three years ago when she first noticed something weird going on in her mailbox.As editor of Relix, a magazine dedicated largely to the Grateful Dead, she was receiving loads of mail from fans -- Deadheads. Many were written from inside federal prisons."And it was not just a few isolated letters," said Ms. Brown, whose magazine has become so swamped with such letters today that it prints them under a new section, dubbed "Heads Behind Bars."What Ms. Brown was seeing back in 1991 were the first results of an undercover operation by the federal Drug Enforcement Agency, as well as local and state police, to target the buying and selling of LSD at Grateful Dead concerts.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 14, 2000
A Westminster man was being held in lieu of $10,000 bail yesterday after being arrested on drug and related charges. Jonathan G. Kelvey, 18, of the first block of Westmoreland St. is accused of selling 10 sugar cubes laced with suspected LSD, a hallucinogen, to an undercover officer who went to Kelvey's home at 3: 35 p.m. Wednesday to make the purchase, according to court documents. Police alleged Kelvey flailed his arms and legs to avoid being handcuffed. Two additional officers helped subdue him. Kelvey was charged on counts of distributing LSD, possession with intent to distribute LSD, possession of a controlled dangerous substance other than marijuana and resisting arrest, according to court records.
NEWS
May 31, 1995
Man arrested on drug chargesCounty police arrested an Annapolis man on drug charges Saturday evening after a search of his car turned up 37 hits of LSD and an ounce of marijuana, a police report said.Sgt. Michael Feeney saw a man sitting in a 1987 Mercury Sable on the Parole Plaza parking lot about 7:10 p.m. When he walked toward the car, the man ducked. Sergeant Feeney asked the man to get out and smelled what he thought was marijuana when the suspect opened the door, police said.Andrew Tompkins Fowler, 22, of the 200 block of Dewey Drive was charged with possession of LSD and marijuana and possession with intent to distribute marijuana and LSD.
NEWS
November 21, 1995
A North Carroll High School senior is being held on $50,000 bail at the county Detention Center after being charged Friday with selling LSD to another student.Randall Scott Mulhern, 18, of Patapsco Road near Finksburg was charged with possession of LSD, possession with intent to distribute and drug distribution on school property.Hampstead Police Chief Kenneth Russell said a student who allegedly paid $10 for two doses of LSD also was arrested.The student, who was not identified because he is a juvenile, had a five doses of the drug in a lip balm container, Chief Russell said.
NEWS
January 15, 1992
The evidence of a resurgence is almost everywhere -- from the kids in tie-dyed T-shirts in the malls to the Grateful Dead stickers on Jeeps and Cabriolets. The oldies are playing again on the radio, though new voices are humming along.These are the children of the baby boomers, who ushered in the counter-culture. From all indications they are enthralled with the romanticism of the '60s. Perhaps it is predictable from a generation that grew up without a cause. Regardless, it is a worrisome prospect for drug treatment officials because along with the cultural trappings has come increased use of LSD -- particularly in the suburbs.
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