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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Loyola University Maryland has laid off 15 staff members and its president said Friday that the college had reached a "critical moment" where large tuition increases could no longer be sustained. The 15 layoffs did not include any faculty members, and Loyola spokesman Nick Alexopulos declined to elaborate on what types of staff and administrative positions were cut. In addition, 22 vacant positions were eliminated. "Higher education institutions throughout the U.S. are facing an uncertain future," Loyola President Rev. Brian F. Linnane wrote in an email to the campus community.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Daniel W. Hubers, a retired real estate broker who was also a competitive sailor, died Saturday at Franklin Square Medical Center of heart failure. The lifelong Middle River resident was 96. The son of Anton Hubers, an optometrist, and Anna Hubers, a homemaker, Daniel Weber Hubers was born and raised on Weber Avenue in Essex. He was a 1936 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended what is now Loyola University Maryland, where he was a pre-med student. Mr. Hubers graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law but never took the Maryland bar examination.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 3, 2012
The first crop of tech startups have launched at the new business accelerator program run by Silicon Valley-based Wasabi Ventures at Loyola University Maryland. The tech startups are varied. One is CodePupil , a website that teaches people how to build websites through exercises and games; PointClickSwitch.com , a site that helps homeowners easily switch their energy providers; and Vidstructor , a video platform for the sports and fitness training industries. The accelerator's office is in the Govans community of North Baltimore, a few minutes away from Loyola's campus.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Robert Gately Keenan Sr., a retired Baltimore County public schools agriculture teacher who was a Roman Catholic deacon, died of a brain tumor Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Parkville resident was 77. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Robert Keenan, an electrician, and Mary Catherine Gately, a homemaker. He grew up in Miami, where he attended schools. He earned a bachelor's degree in agriculture education at the University of Maryland, College Park in 1959. As a student taking senior-year education classes, he met his future wife, Olivia "Libbi" Lange.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Sodexo Inc. plans to lay off 190 workers in May at its operations at Loyola University Maryland, the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Thursday. The Gaithersburg-based company told regulators that the school at 4501 N. Charles St., Baltimore, will no longer be using Sodexo's food services, causing the company to close its facility there and lay off workers on May 31. "Sodexo has enjoyed a long and successful relationship with Loyola University Maryland and unfortunately they've decided to go in a different direction with their campus dining program," said spokesman Enrico Dinges in an email.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Bernard J. "Bernie" Weigman Jr., who had taught at what is now Loyola University Maryland for more than 40 years and also chaired its physics and engineering department, died Saturday of prostate cancer at his Reisterstown home. He was 81. The son of Bernard J. Weigman Sr., treasurer of the old Gunther Brewing Co., and Helen Lee Weger Weigman, a homemaker, Bernard Joseph Weigman Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea. After graduating in 1950 from Loyola High School, Dr. Weigman earned his bachelor's degree in 1954 from what was then Loyola College and a doctorate in physics in 1958 from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. Dr. Weigman returned to Baltimore in 1958, when he joined the faculty of Loyola College.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2012
Daniel M. McGuiness, a retired associate professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland who influenced a younger generation of editors and writers, died Nov. 18of Parkinson's disease. He was 69. "Dan was a born teacher because his way of teaching was to be himself in the classroom," said Thomas Scheye, an English professor at Loyola. "Many of his students followed him from class to class. They were disciples. It was extraordinary, the impact he had. " Daniel Matthew McGuiness was born in 1943 in Davenport, Iowa, the son of Mark McGuiness, a sexton at St. Mary's parish there, and Teresa McGuiness, a waitress.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
They've been married just over two years, but Andy and Seanne Herbick have already exchanged vows three times, most recently Sunday morning at their alma mater, Loyola University Maryland, with about 160 other steadfast lovebirds. Standing in the same stone chapel where they married the first time and listening to the same priest, the Hampden couple reiterated that, yes, they were still in it for good, bad, sickness, health and till death do they part. Since married life has quickly tried them on all of that — including, on the good front, the birth of their son P.J., who's now 13 months old — the words, if anything, ring truer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
James J. Lacy Jr., who set a national scoring record as a standout basketball forward at what is now Loyola University Maryland and was a retired insurance broker, died of complications from melanoma Saturday at his North Roland Park home. He was 87. In 1949, Mr. Lacy was the nation's highest-scoring collegiate basketball player with 2,199 points. "People worshipped him as a player. He was known as No. 16," said former Evening Sun sports editor Bill Tanton. "They played in that little bandbox [of an arena]
EXPLORE
June 21, 2011
Shannon Cunnane, daughter of Joseph Cunnane, of Gainesville, Fla., and Kenneth and Kathleen Dodge, of Crofton, will wed Andrew McSkimming, son of Joan and Marcy McSkimming, of Ellicott City, in September. The bride-to-be earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration from Towson University before completing a master's program in that field at Loyola University Maryland. She is employed by T. Rowe Price, in Baltimore, as an investment specialist. Her fiance graduated from Towson University with an accounting degree.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Today begins my twentieth year teaching copy editing at Loyola University Maryland (and, coincidentally, my twenty-eighth at The Baltimore Sun ). This post, the latest iteration of my first-day-of-class cautions, is what the students in CM 361: Copy Editing, heard this morning. It is only right, honorable, and just for me to let you know what you are in for. This is not a gut course. This is not an easy “A.” Some will take home a “C” at semester's end and consider yourselves lucky to have it.  Here is what one of your predecessors wrote at RateMyProfessors.com: “He is a horrible teacher.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Karen A. Stuart, a Library of Congress archivist who earlier had been head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society where she also was associate editor of the Maryland Historical Magazine, died of cancer Aug. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 59. "As head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society, Karen always took her job seriously, trying hard to help researchers who sometimes had fairly arcane questions of projects," said Robert J. Brugger, an author and Maryland historian who is a senior editor at the Johns Hopkins University Press.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Albert T. "Tom" Rochfort Jr., a retired Baltimore County public school educator, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of an aortic aneurysm. He was 65. The son of Albert T. Rochfort Sr., an advertising executive, and Jane Francis Tibbels Rochfort, an educator, Albert Thomas Rochfort Jr. was born in Baltimore and spent his early years in Rodgers Forge before "crossing York Road and moving to a house on Chumleigh Road in Stoneleigh," said a brother, Stephen Rochfort of Parkville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Hamilton G. Walker Jr., a retired chemical engineer who later established a custom furniture making business, died Friday of cancer at his Stevensville home. He was 72. The son of Hamilton G. Walker Sr., a civil engineer, and Mary Mount Walker, a homemaker, Hamilton Gordon Walker Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1959, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1964 in chemical engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Sister Mary Mark Walsh, a retired teacher who was a member of the Sisters of Mercy for nearly 78 years, died of heart failure Saturday at the Villa, her order's Baltimore County retirement home. She was 97. Born Ruth Anna Walsh in Baltimore County, she was the daughter of Charles S. Walsh, a farmer, and Minnie Woolrey Walsh, a homemaker. According to a biography supplied by the Sisters of Mercy, she grew up on the family farm near the Liberty Dam. There were no Catholic schools in immediate area and she received her early religious training from the Jesuit fathers at the old Woodstock College.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
The days surrounding the Fourth of July holiday are perennially among the busiest of the summer when it comes to travel on Maryland roadways and across its skies - and this year will be no exception. About 858,400 Marylanders are expected to travel between Wednesday and Sunday next week, a 1.6 percent increase over last year and more than any other Independence Day travel period in the past five years, according to estimates to be released today by driver advocacy group AAA Mid-Atlantic.
EXPLORE
March 27, 2013
THE UNIVERSITY OF FINDLAY: The dean's list for fall semester at The University of Findlay has been announced and Nicole Williams, of Fallston, made the list with a 4.0 grade point average. She is a physical therapy major. MCDANIEL COLLEGE: Sophomore Adrian Rowe of Edgewood performs in "Intimate Portraits," an original ensemble-devised work. Free and open to the public, performances are Wednesday, April 17 through Saturday, April 20, 7:30 p.m., in WMC Alumni Hall at McDaniel College, 2 College Hill, Westminster.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
An 8-inch water main break is affecting homes in several residential blocks in North Baltimore on Thursday morning, according to the Baltimore Department of Public Works. The break, in the 600 block of Winston Ave., is in the city's Winston-Govans neighborhood, east of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland and Loyola University Maryland campuses. Customers were without water or had low pressure in the 500 and 600 blocks of Winston, the 5000 block of Govans Ave. and the 5000 block of Ready Ave., the department said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Richard C. "Rick" Hrybyk, a Northrop Grumman electrical engineer and a triathlete, died Friday of a heart attack at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The lifelong Linthicum resident was 55. The son of the late William L. Hrybyk, a Westinghouse Electric Corp. electrical engineer, and Catherine Hrybyk, a retired educator, Richard Conrad Hrybyk was born in Baltimore and raised in Linthicum. After graduating in 1976 from Andover High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1981 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in 1989 from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Loyola University Maryland has laid off 15 staff members and its president said Friday that the college had reached a "critical moment" where large tuition increases could no longer be sustained. The 15 layoffs did not include any faculty members, and Loyola spokesman Nick Alexopulos declined to elaborate on what types of staff and administrative positions were cut. In addition, 22 vacant positions were eliminated. "Higher education institutions throughout the U.S. are facing an uncertain future," Loyola President Rev. Brian F. Linnane wrote in an email to the campus community.
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