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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | May 3, 2007
A Loyola College student who was walking along York Road on Sunday night was confronted by a group of juveniles, one of whom threw a rock that hit him in the head, causing minor injuries, authorities said yesterday. The area where the aggravated assault occurred is commonly traversed by Loyola students, who walk along York Road to various bars and other entertainment spots. The head of the college's public safety department said that the school did not issue an on-campus alert to students about the incident.
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NEWS
May 29, 2014
Sandra H. French Age : 70 Occupation : Retired Educator Education: A.B. Mulhenberg College, English major with Education and Spanish minors Postgraduate work at Loyola College, 30 credits in English and Education Master's Equivalent Certificate: Maryland State Department of Education Previous elected office/community involvement : Governor's Appointee, Commission on Special Education, Access and Equity...
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
The Colorado Mammoth of the National Lacrosse League announced Monday that it has released former captain Gavin Prout (Loyola College). The 35-year-old forward played more than eight of his 12 NLL seasons with the Mammoth, but has not suited up this preseason given the constraints of the new collective bargaining agreement. Prior to training camp, Prout was given the opportunity to sign a free-agent contract with any team in the league. “For years, Gavin Prout was synonymous with the Colorado Mammoth,” said president and general manager Steve Govett . “Unfortunately, he is a casualty of the reduced roster size and newly implemented salary cap of the CBA. Elements of the agreement made for some incredibly difficult decisions; this was the toughest.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Villanova men's basketball coach Jay Wright has seen the pride that one of his top recruits, Mount St. Joseph star Phil Booth, shows when it comes to playing basketball in the Baltimore Catholic League. "Phil knows it's not about him, it's about Mount St. Joseph and it's about the BCL," said Wright, the keynote speaker at the BCL Hall of Fame ceremony at Rolling Road Golf Club in Catonsville. "That's the message - cherish that and never forget where you came from. " Eight former BCL standouts won't soon forget after being honored as the newest members of the league's Hall of Fame on Thursday, a group that included former Maryland star and current assistant coach Juan Dixon.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
Edward A. Doehler, who joined the faculty of Loyola College as the school's only history professor and taught there for 55 years, died Monday at the Stella Maris rehabilitation center in Timonium of complications after surgery for a perforated ulcer. He was 94. Dr. Doehler was the oldest living alumnus of Loyola High School, where he graduated in 1926, his wife said. Four years later, he graduated from Loyola College, and in 1996 he received the college's highest honor - an honorary doctorate.
NEWS
July 28, 1991
How do you attract and keep master teachers in elementary, middle, and high schools when the corporate world can offer bigger salaries and better educational opportunities?Loyola College, in conjunction with the Archdiocesan division of Catholic Schools, has come up with a solution -- Catholic Schools Fellowship Program -- that will help solve the problem for area Catholic schools and provide a model that other private and public schools can adopt. Although the program is designed to attract qualified people into Catholic schools and give them the necessary training, according to Loyola Education Department Chairman Dr. William Amoriell, it can be modified and tailored to meet the needs of other school systems.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
Hanna Geldrich-Leffman, former chairwoman of the modern foreign language department at Loyola College and a faculty member for three decades, died Sunday at her North Homeland residence of complications from postpolio syndrome. She was 72. She was born Hanna Geldrich in Budapest and spent her early years in Hungary. In 1944 , she moved with her family to Konstanz, Germany, where they lived until moving to Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1949. "She completed secondary school in Buenos Aires and then enrolled in medical school," said her husband of 28 years and sole survivor, Peter Leffman, who teaches French at Loyola College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2005
Dr. Nicholas Varga, whose career as an educator, archivist and author at Loyola College spanned nearly four decades, died from complications of neurological surgery Tuesday at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 79. Dr. Varga's areas of expertise were the history of Maryland and the politics of Colonial New York. In an autobiographical sketch, he wrote that he adhered to the theory that teaching history was more than "merely the facts and interpretations of history" but more importantly "how to draw valid conclusions from the available evidence and also how firmly such conclusions were to be held."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2001
Aldo G. Tassi, a Loyola College philosophy professor, died Wednesday of esophageal cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 67 and lived in Towson. A Loyola philosophy teacher since 1972, he wrote numerous scholarly articles and a book on the political philosophy of the American Revolution. "He was an impressive teacher - incredibly dynamic," said John M. Rose, a former student who is chairman of Goucher College's philosophy and religion department. "He would walk in with just one book in his hand and lecture without a note.
NEWS
February 26, 2003
The Rev. John L. Brunett, a Jesuit priest and former Loyola College student adviser, died Saturday of complications from diabetes at his order's infirmary in Philadelphia. He was 80. Born in Rockville, he was a 1941 Georgetown Preparatory School graduate. After study at Villanova University, he joined the Society of Jesus in 1942 and was ordained a priest in Woodstock in 1955. After teaching English at St. Joseph's Preparatory School in Philadelphia, Father Brunett became the first Catholic chaplain of Good Samaritan Hospital in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
James Joseph O'Donnell, a former Maryland transportation secretary and World War II lieutenant commander, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The former Cedarcroft resident was 95. "Jim got things done in a quiet way. He was a big help for me and was a good public servant," said former Gov. Harry R. Hughes, who lives in Denton. "He was very competent and was at all times a real gentleman. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Randall Street in South Baltimore, he attended the Cathedral School and was a 1936 graduate of Loyola High School.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | March 5, 2014
Women's college basketball Loyola Md. loses to BU in Patriot League first round Loyola Maryland sophomore Tiffany Padgett recorded her second double double of the season, but it was not enough as the 10th-seeded Greyhounds (5-25, 2-16) lost, 40-35, to seventh-seeded host Boston University (13-19, 7-11) in the first round of the Patriot League tournament Tuesday night. Loyola grabbed a season-best 54 rebounds, tied for fourth-most in program history. Jeneh Perry had a career-best 16 rebounds.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
James J. Lacy Jr., who set a national scoring record as a standout basketball forward at what is now Loyola University Maryland and was a retired insurance broker, died of complications from melanoma Saturday at his North Roland Park home. He was 87. In 1949, Mr. Lacy was the nation's highest-scoring collegiate basketball player with 2,199 points. "People worshipped him as a player. He was known as No. 16," said former Evening Sun sports editor Bill Tanton. "They played in that little bandbox [of an arena]
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
The Colorado Mammoth of the National Lacrosse League announced Monday that it has released former captain Gavin Prout (Loyola College). The 35-year-old forward played more than eight of his 12 NLL seasons with the Mammoth, but has not suited up this preseason given the constraints of the new collective bargaining agreement. Prior to training camp, Prout was given the opportunity to sign a free-agent contract with any team in the league. “For years, Gavin Prout was synonymous with the Colorado Mammoth,” said president and general manager Steve Govett . “Unfortunately, he is a casualty of the reduced roster size and newly implemented salary cap of the CBA. Elements of the agreement made for some incredibly difficult decisions; this was the toughest.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Arthur Lee Shreve Waxter, a Towson and Bolton Hill real estate developer who was a former Maryland Arts Council chairman, died of cancer Sunday at Talbot Hospice House in Easton. The longtime Roland Park resident was 87. Born in Baltimore and raised on Lombardy Place, he attended Roland Park Elementary School and spent his summers at Ocean City 's Plimhimmon Hotel, the 1894 frame hostelry on Second Street at the boardwalk. It had been founded by his great-grandmother, Rosalie Tilghman Shreve.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Bernard J. "Bernie" Weigman Jr., who had taught at what is now Loyola University Maryland for more than 40 years and also chaired its physics and engineering department, died Saturday of prostate cancer at his Reisterstown home. He was 81. The son of Bernard J. Weigman Sr., treasurer of the old Gunther Brewing Co., and Helen Lee Weger Weigman, a homemaker, Bernard Joseph Weigman Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea. After graduating in 1950 from Loyola High School, Dr. Weigman earned his bachelor's degree in 1954 from what was then Loyola College and a doctorate in physics in 1958 from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. Dr. Weigman returned to Baltimore in 1958, when he joined the faculty of Loyola College.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 16, 1997
The chairman of the theology department at Loyola College of Maryland has been selected as the next dean of the Duke University Divinity School, officials at the Durham, N.C., campus announced yesterday.If the choice is affirmed by Duke's trustees, L. Gregory Jones, 36, an ordained United Methodist minister, will succeed Dennis Campbell on July 1.Jones is a graduate of Duke Divinity; his father, former Duke Divinity Dean Jameson Jones, died in office in 1982, several months before the younger Jones matriculated.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
The Rev. William M. J. Driscoll, a Jesuit priest whose charm helped him raise funds for his order, died Saturday of cardiac arrest at Stella Maris Hospice. The former Loyola College chaplain was 81. In the 1950s and '60s, he was one of the best-known Jesuit clerics in Baltimore. He established a wide following by giving talks, visiting families and writing thousands of letters to potential donors. "He was a classic Jesuit priest a great friend of many old Baltimore families," said Hugh W. Mohler, president of Bay National Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Tribune newspapers | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" subsequently inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, died Tuesday after a brief illness at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 66. His lawyer, Thompson "Topper" Webb, of the Baltimore law firm of Miles & Stockbridge, confirmed his death. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, an author and former Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic for The Washington Post.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Attackman Drew Westervelt scored a career-high eight goals to lead an impressive offensive showing as the Chesapeake Bayhawks blew out the New York Lizards, 21-8, in the first Major League Lacrosse game at Icahn Stadium on Randalls Island, N.Y. Westervelt, a seventh-year veteran out of UMBC and John Carroll, stuck corners on off-ball shots and also dodged for unassisted tallies, collecting his eight goals on 12 shots. Attackman John Grant Jr. scored four times for Chesapeake (4-2)
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