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By Mona Charen | October 7, 1992
AT AN INFORMAL gathering of conservative Republicans, talk turned to where George Bush went wrong. There followed 45 minutes' worth of Bush bashing, until one stalwart piped up, saying ironically, "And we're the loyalists!"This election is shaping up as Anybody But Bush. Even Republicans showed their displeasure with the president during the primary season, when Pat Buchanan or Uncommitted was able to pull 30 percent of the vote.People know very little about what Bill Clinton stands for. (And, it is safe to assume, they will be unpleasantly surprised when they find out.)
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 15, 2010
Wearing a giddy smile, Marian Harrington sat behind the wheel of a gleaming Toyota Camry Sunday, waving from the sunroof of the silver sedan like a daytime game-show winner. A retired physical therapist from Perry Hall, Harrington, 63, came to the 2010 Motor Trend International Auto Show in Baltimore with her husband to decide on a new car purchase. Even though she clutched a sheet of paper listing the names of nearly a dozen models recently recalled by Toyota, the Harringtons said they would not abandon their favorite car manufacturer.
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NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Impassioned government loyalists hurled rocks from atop the national television station onto opposition demonstrators yesterday as they tried to march into the center of Haiti's capital, sparking fights and police gunfire in another display of the deep divisions that some here say signal a looming civil war. Yesterday's march from the hilltop suburb of Petionville into the poor and hostile neighborhoods of central Port-au-Prince was...
NEWS
By Oscar Avila and Oscar Avila,Chicago Tribune | December 2, 2007
CARACAS, Venezuela -- After nine years amassing power and stirring socialist movements across the hemisphere, President Hugo Chavez is finding that even his hero, the South American liberator Simon Bolivar, seems to want to rein him in. Bolivar's own words are being employed by Chavez opponents to attack a referendum today through which the Venezuelan leader hopes to drastically expand presidential authority in his oil-rich nation. When a leader gets too much power, "that is where usurpation and tyranny originate," Bolivar warns in banners all over town.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Democrats who only days ago feared that the White House sex scandal would cripple their candidates in a midterm election year now say that, to their amazement, the crisis might be galvanizing party loyalists and bolstering efforts to raise money.In interviews over the past few days, dozens of Democratic politicians, strategists and fund-raising consultants here and across the country said that the accusations against President Clinton, at first glance, could not have come at a worse time: The party faces $9 million in debt just as it is trying to advance an agenda in Congress and as candidates are gearing up for the November elections.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - While the battle for Baghdad has so far been less than the bloody quagmire that military planners feared, a more likely spot for a violent last stand of Saddam Hussein's loyalists could be the northern city of Tikrit, Hussein's ancestral home and the spiritual center of the tribal ties that brought him to power. Many of the Iraqi leader's most trusted friends and advisers come from Tikrit, as do a disproportionate number of security officers and Republican Guard troops. Unlike most of Iraq, where allegiance to Hussein was imposed with brute force, Tikrit has been largely coddled by the regime and rewarded for its loyalty with paved roads and new schools.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The new crop of lawmakers elected to serve in the next Congress features a handful of old faces and prominent party loyalists whose names already are familiar in Washington and around the nation. The Senate's new class in particular includes a few members that colleagues may have a hard time calling "freshmen." They include two one-time aspirants for the Republican presidential nomination: former Tennessee Gov. Lamar Alexander and North Carolina's Elizabeth Dole, who has held two Cabinet posts, headed the American Red Cross and is married to Bob Dole, the GOP's presidential standard-bearer in 1996.
FEATURES
June 25, 1995
Colonial Williamsburg will celebrate the July 4 holiday with several events.A British occupation is scheduled Saturday and July 2 and will feature an encampment of British troops at Market Square. Soldiers will be engaged in recruiting and training American loyalists, and a fife and drum corps will play.The program July 4 includes a fife and drum corps march to Bruton Church followed by a ceremony and an early-evening garden party at the Governor's Place with 18th-century food and entertainment.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1992 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | July 20, 1992
There's a moment in the movie "Amadeus" that always makes the hairs on the back of my neck bristle. Young Mozart plays the piano before Emperor Joseph II. Salieri, the reigning musician of the day, is in the background. Mozart sits and begins a Salieri score. Then he starts to improvise, and a voluptuous burst of trills and arpeggios fills the air.I thought about "Amadeus" after re-reading a Newsweek story (March 1992) which quoted Robert D. Knoll of Consumer Reports: "The Americans are building nice average cars but few 'gee-whiz-look-at-this' cars."
SPORTS
By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | May 19, 1996
There are hat persons and hair persons. The Preakness set was decidedly pro chapeau.Even the race-day weather favored hats. Fog and drizzle misted the blossoming brims of early arrivals for munchies in the party tent village set up on lush fake turf in the infield.When the sun popped at midday, so did hats of dazzling color. That may account for the number of large, dark wrap glasses with a double-CC logo that were seen on so many women, even in the shady retreat of the Jockey Club.Although race day brought out many black and yellow loyalists, there was run on hot pinks and frosty cools that was as diverse as a rainbow of stable silks.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | April 5, 2007
The latest issue of ESPN The Magazine includes the annual "Ultimate standings," in which it ranks the franchises of the major sports. Baltimore, I have good news and bad news to share: The good: The Ravens, ranked No. 54 last year, moved up to No. 32. Here's what the magazine said: Ozzie drafts All-Pros in his sleep. And the D could start you and blank Cleveland. ... OK, now the bad: The Orioles, ranked No. 80 last year, slid to No. 105. To put that into perspective, there are only 122 teams.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2007
An Ehrlich administration loyalist questioned the legitimacy of a firm headed by GOP strategist Carol L. Hirschburg during a pre-bid session held before the firm's inclusion in a $110 million technology contract with the Maryland Department of Human Resources, according to a transcript of the meeting obtained by The Sun. During the January 2006 meeting, former state transportation administrator Gregory J. Maddalone asked whether Hirschburg's firm would...
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2006
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -- Leaders of the moderate Fatah Party accused gunmen of deliberately targeting innocent children in the ambush killing of an intelligence officer's three young sons yesterday, an unprecedented attack that threatened to escalate fighting between Palestinian factions. The boys and their driver were killed by masked men who riddled their car with more than 60 rounds of automatic weapons fire as they were leaving for school in the morning. Their father, a Fatah loyalist who had dodged a September shooting attack by Hamas militants, was not in the vehicle.
NEWS
September 23, 2006
Joe Glazer, 88, a singer-songwriter who rallied union loyalists and sympathizers, died Tuesday at his Chevy Chase home of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Mr. Glazer, often called Labor's Troubadour, sang songs of solidarity on picket lines and union halls in almost every state. He also performed for many liberal politicians; in 1980, President Jimmy Carter invited him to play at the White House. He recorded more than 30 albums, wrote a book about labor music, recorded the songs of others and helped recruit a new generation of protest singers.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Reporter | September 11, 2006
TAMPA, Fla. -- The most hardcore Tampa Bay Buccaneers fans are a hardy bunch - you would be, too, if you walked around Raymond James Stadium looking like an extra from Pirates of the Caribbean - but even they give way for "The Sign Man." "The Sign Man," aka Russ Barner, has developed a reputation as the organization's No. 1 loyalist. The 63-year-old chiropractor has created hundreds of signs supporting the team. He also has sent the players and coaches off on their road contests and has stood outside the airport as early as 5 a.m. to greet them on their return flights.
NEWS
By MIKE PRIDE and MIKE PRIDE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2005
Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln Doris Kearns Goodwin Simon & Schuster / 944 pages Doris Kearns Goodwin has borne her big new Lincoln book into a literary world divided into two camps: those who can't forgive her plagiarism and those too ready to forgive. In writing Team of Rivals she toiled under the burden of the controversy, and it shows. Goodwin chose Abraham Lincoln as a subject years before the 2002 scandal that damaged her reputation. Long, readable explorations of the Kennedys and the Roosevelts had won her riches and renown as a popular, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian.
NEWS
January 22, 1997
NEWT GINGRICH, in our considered judgment, would be rejected as speaker of the House of Representatives if his colleagues were given a chance to register a second opinion.Yesterday he was officially reprimanded and handed a $300,000 penalty by an overwhelming vote of 395-28, thus becoming the first speaker ever to suffer such a humiliation. He is the likely target of an Internal Revenue Service probe as to whether he violated tax laws by financing his political activity through tax-exempt charitable contributions.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2004
JERUSALEM - Gunmen claiming allegiance to Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat fired warning shots outside a meeting hall in the West Bank city of Nablus where members of Arafat's Fatah movement gathered yesterday to discuss internal reforms, witnesses said. No one was injured when about 15 masked members of the Al Awda Brigades fired their weapons to express displeasure over what they said was a move against the Palestinian Authority president. In Gaza early today, soldiers opened fire as bulldozers destroyed a building, and a woman was killed when a bullet came in through her window, residents said.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 27, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Followers of the United States' "No. 1 target" in Iraq announced yesterday that they had kidnapped three Turkish contractors and threatened to behead them, even as President Bush was flying to Turkey for a NATO summit. The latest abductions came as 31 people were killed in insurgent attacks across the country. The seizure of the three Turkish civilian contractors by loyalists of Jordanian fugitive Abu Musab al-Zarqawi appeared aimed at undermining Bush during his Istanbul meeting with allies of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
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