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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Confronted by demands from this nation's grand assembly for a voice in deciding who runs the next government, President Hamid Karzai put the delegates on notice yesterday that he will make the appointments and at best let them know his selections before their session disperses. Karzai also responded to the gathering's conflicting proposals for formation of a legislature with a tried-and-true delaying tactic: He formed a committee. The announcements made by the newly chosen transitional president on the seventh day of the prolonged assembly, or loya jirga, confirmed the impression that had been forming among delegates for days that further decisions about the country's governance will be Karzai's, not the assembly's.
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NEWS
December 2, 2013
The Obama administration is understandably frustrated by its efforts to forge an agreement with Afghan President Hamid Karzai that would allow a scaled-down U.S. troop presence to remain in the country after most American and NATO forces leave next year. Last week the U.S. believed it had finally reached a deal to that effect with Mr. Karzai, only to have the Afghan leader balk at the last minute, insisting he won't sign anything until the U.S. acceded to a new series of demands that the Americans thought had already been settled.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Hamid Karzai, who was selected to lead the country for the next 18 months by the traditional grand council gathered here, tried yesterday to reach out to all of the nation's ethnic and regional groups as he asked the delegates to form a National Assembly to work with him. "We should create a council from the delegates here that should work with us over the next 18 months," he said. "They should hold a hand of anger over me so I do not go too far." It was another effort to involve the people in the decision-making process and placate many delegates who say that no one has been responding to their concerns.
NEWS
By Hamida Ghafour and Hamida Ghafour,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - After three weeks of frequently contentious debate between rival Afghan factions, delegates to a historic national convention agreed yesterday on a constitution that is a key step toward Afghanistan's first democratic elections. The loya jirga, an assembly made up of 500 delegates from across the war-ravaged country, approved a presidency with executive powers, two vice presidents and two legislative bodies with considerable authority. "We have proven that through 30 years of war we still have a culture and we are still civilized," President Hamid Karzai said at the closing ceremony.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2003
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai won an important victory yesterday in his fight for a strong presidency by defeating a delegate revolt on the opening day of this nation's historic constitutional convention. Supporters of broad power-sharing in a parliamentary system, which Karzai opposes, failed to elect one of their leaders as chairman of the traditional loya jirga, or grand council, which is debating a draft constitution. Instead, Karzai ally and former Afghan President Sibghatullah Mojaddidi won the chairman's seat, which should help the U.S.-backed Afghan leader beat back opponents of a powerful presidential system.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
Afghanistan convenes a loya jirga - grand council - of 500 delegates from around the country Saturday to consider a 50-page draft constitution. The document, written after a year of work and presented Nov. 3, envisions a powerful president and a bicameral legislature - similar to the U.S. system of government, with a separation of powers between the executive and the upper and lower houses of the legislature. It has already generated lively debate. Yesterday, President Hamid Karzai weighed in, saying he would not seek re-election if the loya jirga, which is expected to deliberate for about 10 days, decides instead on a parliamentary system of government.
NEWS
By Hamida Ghafour and Hamida Ghafour,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - After three weeks of frequently contentious debate between rival Afghan factions, delegates to a historic national convention agreed yesterday on a constitution that is a key step toward Afghanistan's first democratic elections. The loya jirga, an assembly made up of 500 delegates from across the war-ravaged country, approved a presidency with executive powers, two vice presidents and two legislative bodies with considerable authority. "We have proven that through 30 years of war we still have a culture and we are still civilized," President Hamid Karzai said at the closing ceremony.
NEWS
June 12, 2002
In an immense air-conditioned tent in Kabul, a new Afghan government is being born. More than 1,500 delegates from throughout the country assembled yesterday for ceremonies marking the opening of the grand council, or loya jirga, charged with choosing leaders and establishing a form of government. International peacekeepers stood watch inside and outside the tent amid tight security. The council, expected to last until the weekend, hopes to bring an end to decades of violence in the country of 22 million people.
NEWS
June 10, 2002
THE GOOD NEWS about politics in Afghanistan is that it is now actually possible for things to get worse. This week, 1,501 delegates to the loya jirga - or grand council - will get together in Kabul to form a government to run the country for the next two years. Beset by warlordism, drought, tardy aid donors, continued fighting against roving Taliban units, and the lack of an army to call its own, Afghanistan has nonetheless gotten this far and just might keep going. Hamid Karzai, the interim leader, wields no real power outside his capital, but has been able to persuade various regional strongmen that it is in their interests to go along with his program.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 12, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - The last serious presidential challenger to interim leader Hamid Karzai withdrew his candidacy yesterday, enhancing the impression among many delegates to this nation's grand assembly that the selection has been fixed by foreign advisers and those already in power. Former President Burhanuddin Rabbani's announcement that he was bowing out led to speculation among observers and delegates that he had been promised a prestigious post. Many delegates to the chaotic loya jirga - the assembly that is Afghanistan's traditional forum for choosing its leaders - were still smarting from the news a day earlier that Mohammad Zahir Shah, the nation's former king, would not run for an executive position or seek restoration of the monarchy.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2003
KABUL, Afghanistan - President Hamid Karzai won an important victory yesterday in his fight for a strong presidency by defeating a delegate revolt on the opening day of this nation's historic constitutional convention. Supporters of broad power-sharing in a parliamentary system, which Karzai opposes, failed to elect one of their leaders as chairman of the traditional loya jirga, or grand council, which is debating a draft constitution. Instead, Karzai ally and former Afghan President Sibghatullah Mojaddidi won the chairman's seat, which should help the U.S.-backed Afghan leader beat back opponents of a powerful presidential system.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
Afghanistan convenes a loya jirga - grand council - of 500 delegates from around the country Saturday to consider a 50-page draft constitution. The document, written after a year of work and presented Nov. 3, envisions a powerful president and a bicameral legislature - similar to the U.S. system of government, with a separation of powers between the executive and the upper and lower houses of the legislature. It has already generated lively debate. Yesterday, President Hamid Karzai weighed in, saying he would not seek re-election if the loya jirga, which is expected to deliberate for about 10 days, decides instead on a parliamentary system of government.
NEWS
June 25, 2002
AFGHANISTAN'S NEW government got off to a rocky start last week when police blocked streets leading to their own headquarters in Kabul to protest the naming of a new minister of the interior. Others cruised the city in trucks, showing off the sort of heavy weapons that aren't normally associated with police work. The point having been made, the protesters dispersed after a few hours, but it was an early shot across the bow of President Hamid Karzai's ship of state. Fragile hardly begins to describe the situation in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Confronted by demands from this nation's grand assembly for a voice in deciding who runs the next government, President Hamid Karzai put the delegates on notice yesterday that he will make the appointments and at best let them know his selections before their session disperses. Karzai also responded to the gathering's conflicting proposals for formation of a legislature with a tried-and-true delaying tactic: He formed a committee. The announcements made by the newly chosen transitional president on the seventh day of the prolonged assembly, or loya jirga, confirmed the impression that had been forming among delegates for days that further decisions about the country's governance will be Karzai's, not the assembly's.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Hamid Karzai, who was selected to lead the country for the next 18 months by the traditional grand council gathered here, tried yesterday to reach out to all of the nation's ethnic and regional groups as he asked the delegates to form a National Assembly to work with him. "We should create a council from the delegates here that should work with us over the next 18 months," he said. "They should hold a hand of anger over me so I do not go too far." It was another effort to involve the people in the decision-making process and placate many delegates who say that no one has been responding to their concerns.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 14, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghanistan's grand council overwhelmingly elected interim leader Hamid Karzai as head of state yesterday in this battle-scarred country's first peaceful transfer of power in more than two decades. The 44-year-old Pashtun tribal chief, who received 1,295 out of 1,575 votes, or 82 percent, is poised to assume the presidency of a transitional government whose composition and structure still must be decided by the council, or loya jirga. Full elections will be held within two years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - The delegates complained about the food. They ridiculed the man running the meeting. They even criticized the warlords in the front row. Inside an air-conditioned white tent billowing in the wind, Afghan democracy took a baby step forward yesterday. In the first day of open debate in the loya jirga, or grand council, to select a transitional government, the 1,551 delegates proved that Afghans could be as adept in debate as on the battlefield; they argued over issues ranging from poverty to the national anthem to ceremonial titles for the king.
NEWS
June 25, 2002
AFGHANISTAN'S NEW government got off to a rocky start last week when police blocked streets leading to their own headquarters in Kabul to protest the naming of a new minister of the interior. Others cruised the city in trucks, showing off the sort of heavy weapons that aren't normally associated with police work. The point having been made, the protesters dispersed after a few hours, but it was an early shot across the bow of President Hamid Karzai's ship of state. Fragile hardly begins to describe the situation in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - The delegates complained about the food. They ridiculed the man running the meeting. They even criticized the warlords in the front row. Inside an air-conditioned white tent billowing in the wind, Afghan democracy took a baby step forward yesterday. In the first day of open debate in the loya jirga, or grand council, to select a transitional government, the 1,551 delegates proved that Afghans could be as adept in debate as on the battlefield; they argued over issues ranging from poverty to the national anthem to ceremonial titles for the king.
NEWS
June 12, 2002
In an immense air-conditioned tent in Kabul, a new Afghan government is being born. More than 1,500 delegates from throughout the country assembled yesterday for ceremonies marking the opening of the grand council, or loya jirga, charged with choosing leaders and establishing a form of government. International peacekeepers stood watch inside and outside the tent amid tight security. The council, expected to last until the weekend, hopes to bring an end to decades of violence in the country of 22 million people.
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