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NEWS
September 11, 2013
Maybe Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, along with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Gov. Martin O'Malley and the House of Delegates should stop and reflect upon the fact that their outrageous tax decisions just might have an effect on the plight of the minimum wage worker ("Miller adds his voice to call for higher minimum wage," Sept. 6). Higher wages mean more money to be grabbed by these people with little in return except rhetoric. F. Cordell
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NEWS
February 6, 2014
When are the majority of Maryland voters going to wake up and see that the progressive, far left politicians in our state care only about the rich, not the middle class and certainly not the poor? When our elected officials have an opportunity to perhaps lower taxes on the ones who can least afford to pay, what do they do? They plan a cut in estate taxes so the millionaires can leave more money for their families ("Estate tax relief seems on track in Annapolis," Feb. 2). How does that help the middle class and the poor?
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NEWS
December 10, 2012
President Barack Obama, largely due to his upbringing and background, sincerely thinks he is leading this country in the right direction. However, hard facts powerfully indicate that he is leading us in the wrong direction. The Obama administration has spent more in four years than the sum of all the administrations since George Washington. A conservative estimate of the federal government's unfunded liabilities for the year ended in 2011 is $87 trillion. Just to avoid accumulating more debt, Washington would have to collect $8 trillion in tax revenue, not to pay off our national debt and have reserves against unfunded liabilities, but just to avoid accumulating more debt.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Democratic legislative leaders gave partial support Monday to a push to raise the minimum wage, with some reiterating unwillingness to impose a "one size fits all" increase across the state. They provided few other clues as to how they will respond to Gov. Martin O'Malley's call to lift the state's minimum pay from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016, with future increases tied to inflation. "That's a debate we will have in committee," House Speaker Michael E. Busch said Monday at a breakfast for business leaders hosted by the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
I read Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column ("Obama economics: More government means more growth," June 20) with interest and disbelief. Well, not really. But his comment at the end about the "left's dangerous love affair with ever-higher taxes" brought a smile to my face. Is Mr. Ehrlich not aware that President Barack Obama followed the Republicans' call for lower taxes to fix the problems left by his predecessor? Mr. Obama cut taxes over and over again to the point that we now have the lowest tax rate seen in the United States in more than 60 years!
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | December 19, 1991
Two-thirds of county residents think they pay too much in taxes for the services they receive, while only 1 percent think they don't pay enough.The results of a survey released at a press conference yesterday came as no surprise to county officials. Elderly residents were most in favor of lower taxes, with 75 percent saying they thought their taxes were too high.Asked what they would most like the county to do to improve the quality of life for residents, 34 percent chose lower taxes over better police protection, education or growth controls.
NEWS
October 21, 2013
When the Greater Baltimore Committee asked a roundtable of CEOs for ideas on how to improve Maryland's business climate, many of the answers were unsurprising - lower taxes, a more predictable regulatory system and the like. But at least one of them wasn't so intuitively obvious: reforming the way Maryland draws its legislative districts. The executives' reasoning, according to GBC head Don Fry, is that giving the task of redrawing political boundaries after the census to an independent commission rather than elected officials would reduce partisanship and increase the likelihood that lawmakers would give serious consideration to a wide variety of perspectives.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 14, 1997
We are shocked that political contributions buy access to office-holders. Simply shocked.The game in Annapolis is not to lower taxes but to show that failure to lower them is everyone else's fault.The price of coffee is going through the roof. Switch to goofy teas.Wow! A Hard Rock Cafe blaring noise and dishing burgers right (( in the Inner Harbor, years after everywhere else.Pub Date: 3/14/97
NEWS
September 1, 2012
I keep hearing the Republican mantra that we need to reduce taxes, especially on the super rich. That's why they keep extending the Bush tax on them. They say that with these lower taxes on the top 2 percent, money goes back into the economy, businesses thrive, and as a result more jobs are created. If this is true, why am I not seeing the results of more jobs being created? David Gosey, Towson
NEWS
December 10, 1990
WHEN THE GOING gets tough, William Donald Schaefer simply pulls out his "Governor's Pocket Book of Brief Prayers," a 38-page compendium of special reflections written to ease his troubled mind.There's a prayer for nearly all gubernatorial occasions: on responsibility, on being a servant, responding to needs, preparing for a meeting, the burdens of office, a busy schedule, for understanding, for the poor, for perfection, for patience and for serving the people.Mr. Schaefer's special interests are recognized, too: a prayer for Western Maryland ("may its natural beauty be preserved for future generations")
NEWS
January 19, 2014
As a financial adviser for 35 years, I take issue with your editorial advising against reducing Maryland's estate tax ("Settling the estate tax," Jan. 17). Through the years, I have seen more and more of my clients take residence in Florida or other states with no such tax, and these are precisely the people one would want to keep in Maryland. They pay more than their share of income, sales and other taxes when residing here, versus nothing when elsewhere. The Sun suggests doing some estate planning, which is expensive and unnecessary.
NEWS
October 21, 2013
When the Greater Baltimore Committee asked a roundtable of CEOs for ideas on how to improve Maryland's business climate, many of the answers were unsurprising - lower taxes, a more predictable regulatory system and the like. But at least one of them wasn't so intuitively obvious: reforming the way Maryland draws its legislative districts. The executives' reasoning, according to GBC head Don Fry, is that giving the task of redrawing political boundaries after the census to an independent commission rather than elected officials would reduce partisanship and increase the likelihood that lawmakers would give serious consideration to a wide variety of perspectives.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
Maybe Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, along with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Gov. Martin O'Malley and the House of Delegates should stop and reflect upon the fact that their outrageous tax decisions just might have an effect on the plight of the minimum wage worker ("Miller adds his voice to call for higher minimum wage," Sept. 6). Higher wages mean more money to be grabbed by these people with little in return except rhetoric. F. Cordell
NEWS
September 11, 2013
Increasing the minimum wage in Maryland will do nothing but hurt wage earners and businesses ("Miller adds his voice to call for higher minimum wage," Sept. 6). If Gov. Martin O'Malley, House Speaker Michael Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller really want to help wage earners, lower their taxes. Minimum wage jobs are not meant for someone trying to support a family. They're meant as starter jobs or a retiree's job. But Maryland has slammed wage earners and businesses with exorbitant taxes, so no one is earning enough.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
There is widespread agreement that the U.S. can become more competitive in the global marketplace if it lowers its corporate tax rate. There's also a consensus that the nation needs to spend more money on its vital infrastructure. So one might assume that a proposal to accomplish both — and one that would create thousands of jobs without adding to the deficit — would be greeted with a roar of approval. Hah, where have you been? The latest "grand bargain" President Barack Obama announced in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Tuesday drew immediate opposition from Republicans.
NEWS
By Christopher B. Summers | July 18, 2013
To paraphrase the British author Samuel Johnson, nothing focuses the mind like an imminent election. After raising billions in new taxes during Gov. Martin O'Malley's tenure, state legislators have begun focusing their minds on next year's election and how best to retain their jobs. Judging from recent public comments, top lawmakers have decided the best way is to cut taxes just before voters go to the polls. In April, House Speaker Mike Busch, a Democrat, suggested, "If there's an increase in revenues that results [from economic growth]
NEWS
January 28, 1994
There's news for homeowners in east Columbia: Their property assessments are about where they were three years ago, and in some cases have plunged. The question is: Is this good news or bad?It's a double-edged sword actually. Lower assessments translate into lower taxes. But they also can mean a reduction in the value of a home. Take, for instance, the residents of the village of Kings Contrivance. Homeowners in the village's Dickinson neighborhood probably relish the way their appraisals have turned out. Between 1987 and 1990, appraisals jumped 25 percent, an appreciation of about $25,000 on a $100,000 house.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | May 31, 2011
Marylanders often complain — correctly — about their state’s high tax rate. But a new report by the Council On State Taxation gives Maryland an A-, the highest among the 50 states, for tax administration. COST rated states on a variety of factors: efficient filing procedures, fair property tax appeals (including whether the appeals are handled by an independent tribunal) and uniform tax base and rates, meaning the tax burden doesn’t fall disproportionately on businesses.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Baltimore residents will pay less in property taxes but more in stormwater and taxi fees under a $2.4 billion budget approved by the City Council on Monday. The cut will reduce the property tax payments on a home valued at $200,000 by about $140. But the same resident will pay $40 to $120 for stormwater cleanup and a 25-cent fee on each taxi ride - with another water bill hike on the horizon. The result? The cost of living in Baltimore could go up for many people. "Hopefully, it'll be a wash for residents," said Councilman Robert W. Curran, who represents Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 11, 2013
In 1998, when President Bill Clinton signed the bipartisan Internet Tax Freedom Act, which prohibited state and local taxation of Internet access and Internet-only services, the purpose was to promote the commercial potential of the Internet, especially for start-ups and small businesses. Congress extended the bill three times, the latest until 2014. Now there's the Marketplace Fairness Act, which, writes The Washington Post, "would allow states and local governments to require large Internet retailers and other 'remote sellers' with sales over $1 million annually to collect sales taxes and send the revenue to the appropriate location.
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