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BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 10, 1995
WASHINGTON-- Thoughts of sugar plums and holiday cheer may be dancing through your head this month, but top economists suggest that you pause to focus on something that could save you a lot of money: The mortgage-refinancing boom that's shaping up for early 1996.Some analysts argue that a refinancing boom already is in progress. They cite data from the latest Mortgage Bankers Association of America loan application index showing that nearly 40 percent of new loans currently being taken out are for refinancings of existing mortgages -- twice the normal rate, and nearly five times what it was in early 1995.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
As hundreds of men marching against violence Friday night along Baltimore's North Avenue passed Gina Williams' vehicle, she applauded. "I'm glad to see some black men stand up for their community," said Williams, 59. Last year amid a surge in violence in Baltimore, a group of men hatched an idea in a barbershop: Get 300 men to walk the streets in a demonstration not only against violence but the apathy that allows it to persist. They met and far exceeded their goal, attracting more than 600 men who trudged the length of North Avenue, from the west side through midtown to the east side and back.
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BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,RAM Research Corp.Staff Writer | March 20, 1992
Charles R. Wilson had been watching interest rates falling everywhere -- everywhere, that is, but on his credit card.So, last month the 46-year-old government worker from Frederick did something about it. He turned in his card for one with an interest rate that rises and falls with the market."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed increase in Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10 cleared its first hurdle Monday night as a House committee approved the bill and rejected a proposal to set a different standard for rural areas. The House Economic Matters Committee voted 13-8 to send the measure - with significant changes -- to the full House. Before doing so, it amended the bill to eliminate a provision calling for the minimum wage to be increased automatically to keep pace with inflation after reaching $10.10 on Jan. 2017.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | November 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- Signs of lower interest rates failed to help stocks yesterday.The NASDAQ Combined Composite index of smaller over-the-counter stocks declined 0.55, to 634.37, ending a six-day rally. Intel, U.S. Healthcare, Food Lion and Oracle Systems accounted for much of the slide."The NASDAQ has come a long way, and it needs a breather," said Jon Groveman, president of Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co.The Dow Jones industrial average declined 0.54, to 3,239.79, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index gained 0.67, to 422.87.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
Aided by a drop in interest rates, the Baltimore area housing market showed signs of revival in January, as the number of homes under contract increased by 36 percent compared with January 1991. A total of 1,486 units were pending sale in January, compared with 1,092 a year ago.The number of settled sales, however, declined slightly, from 983 to 950. The dollar value of homes settled in January also slipped, from $119 million to $116 million. And the average price of a home sold in January was $122,067, just slightly less than a year earlier.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | February 20, 1991
The stock market, apparently buoyed by lower interest rates, has turned up with such sustained strength in recent weeks that many forecasters have done yet another flip-flop on the economy.Given the market's well-earned reputation in predicting economic turns, these seers note, it would seem that a short, shallow recession is more likely our fate than a prolonged, deeper slump.These are the same folks, generally, who were telling us a couple weeks ago to batten down the hatches, which was itself a reversal from the outlook a couple of months ago, when we were told to expect only a modest dip in the economy.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 14, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rallied yesterday after reports of slower inflation spurred optimism that interest rates will fall further this year and help the economy to regain ground. Shares of banks and retailers led the advance as a big bond rally sent long-term rates plummeting.The prospect of lower rates was welcomed by investors concerned that corporate profit growth has stalled and taken the fuel from a six-month rally. Falling rates cut borrowing costs and lead businesses and consumers to increase spending.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 1997
The largest study ever undertaken of the causes of crime and delinquency has found that there are lower rates of violence in urban neighborhoods with a strong sense of community and values, where most adults discipline children for missing school or scrawling graffiti.In an article published last week in the journal Science, three leaders of the study team concluded, "By far the largest predictor of the violent crime rate was collective efficacy," a term they use to mean a sense of trust, common values and cohesion in neighborhoods.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 27, 2002
DEAR MR. Greenspan: Jean von Briesen appreciates all your efforts, but she will not be helping the economy much anytime soon. You keep saying you're cutting interest rates to get people to spend more, but Jean is spending less. Each time rates drop, Jean and the other people who live on bank savings, bonds and other rate-sensitive investments have less financial wherewithal, not more. You thought you were doing the country a big favor by reducing the key Federal Reserve interest rate to 1.25 percent.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
The Department of Veterans Affairs is approving claims for post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from military sexual assault or harassment at rates that are "significantly lower" than those for PTSD from combat and other causes, advocacy groups said Thursday. The advocates said the lower rates mean women - who are more likely than men to file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma - are denied compensation for PTSD disproportionately. But when men do file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma, they said, they are approved at rates lower than those for women.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
With the start of classes just weeks away, Maryland financial aid directors sighed with relief that Congress has finally reached an agreement on student loan interest rates that will lower costs for borrowers this academic year. "We have been getting calls from students," said Zhanna Goltser, director of financial aid at Notre Dame of Maryland University in Baltimore. "It's great that it will save money for students who are borrowing now. " "Now" is the key word. Under a new formula created by lawmakers, the rate on certain federal loans could go up significantly in a few years.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
The Baltimore school system is paying bonuses to teachers and administrators at struggling schools that reduce suspensions, drawing criticism from union leaders who say the program could provide a financial incentive to ignore problems and jeopardize school safety. In addition to cutting down on suspensions for nonviolent incidents, the program pays bonuses for helping to reduce truancy and absenteeism. The school system has moved away from zero-tolerance discipline policies - a nationwide trend aimed at disciplining students in school rather than keeping them out through suspensions, which have risen in Baltimore over the past two years.
NEWS
January 7, 2013
How's this for an easy, painless way to solve the Social Security "problem?" We reduce the Social Security deduction to 5 percent - or even 4 percent or 3 percent but deduct it from all of everyone's income. After all, it is deducted from 100 percent of my income, and of most people's income, so why not from everyone's income? If it were reduced to 4 percent instead of the present 6.2 percent, most people would have more money in their paychecks. Deductions would not start to get higher than you are already paying now until you reached an income of around $250,000 - rich people who could easily afford it. Everyone else with incomes under $250,000 would pay less and have extra money in their paychecks to spend and stimulate the economy.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
It has become part of college sports -- as ingrained as dunks and FieldTurf -- for large universities to accept prized basketball and football recruits and other athletes under more forgiving admissions criteria than are used for other students. Less understood is what happens to these top athletes once they arrive in their college classrooms. Do their grades ever catch up to those of their teammates or the rest of the student body? Do they remain in school and graduate? Interviews and documents, obtained by The Baltimore Sun through more than a dozen public records requests, offer a rare profile of hundreds of these athletes and show that the "special admits" typically have not performed as well as other players in the classroom and pose unique and expensive academic challenges at the University of Maryland, North Carolina State, Georgia Tech and other schools.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
MGM Resorts International says it would build a resort and casino at National Harbor near Washington if the state authorizes a site there - but only if Maryland lowers the tax rate on gambling revenue and allows table games. "We could not do it under the current law," James J. Murren, the MGM chairman and CEO, said Friday at a news conference in Annapolis. MGM announced Friday that it has signed a letter of intent with the Peterson Cos., owners of the National Harbor development on the Potomac River inPrince George's County.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | September 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Cable television subscribers nationwide ar supposed to see lower rates and better service, under controversial legislation that could come up for a House vote as early as tomorrow morning.The legislation already agreed upon by House and Senate negotiators is trumpeted by supporters as the most significant consumer bill of the year, and there's no disputing its effects could be felt in households nationwide. But what the consequences would be is now a matter of debate and lobbying.
NEWS
April 26, 2012
If you have a college student in the family - or an interest in presidential politics - by now you've probably heard that the interest rates on Stafford student loans are set to double on July 1 unless Congress takes action. President Barack Obama has been touring college campuses this week asking that rates be held to 3.4 percent. As one might imagine, this is a message that has some traction with young voters, a crucial bloc for Democrats, and the reception at places like the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Colorado at Boulder, where the president has taken his message, has been warm and welcoming.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Thanks to demand from the defense sector, the vacancy rate for office space in Baltimore's suburbs is lower than anywhere else in the United States except for two suburban markets in California, a new commercial real estate report shows. Suburban Baltimore had an office vacancy rate of 14 percent, according to an overview of the mid-Atlantic commercial market released this month by Cushman & Wakefield, a commercial real estate firm that operates nationwide. That's lower than any other suburban market the firm tracks except for two high-tech hotbeds: the San Francisco peninsula, which has an 11.6 percent vacancy rate, and Silicon Valley, with a 12.7 percent rate.
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