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By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | October 2, 1991
Shoppers at George's Superthrift grocery stores should be starting to notice some changes on the shelves and at the cash register.Instead of Red & White and Our Value products, IGA and First Choice items are going up as the store changes from Superthrift to IGA."I just thought by joining IGA it would help my organization," said owner George Mezar--. "The main change will be lower prices -- about 4,000 prices will be lowered, mostly in grocery, dairy and frozen foods."The Eldersburg store opened in 1963 on Liberty Road.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
— Until recently, Paul Reed Smith Guitars sold only American-made instruments for more than $2,000 and Korean-made guitars retailing for about $700. To fill the gap — and with something U.S.-made, no less — the Eastern Shore company needed a design that could go from wood to instrument in dramatically less time. Guitars in its core, high-end line take about 20 hours to manufacture. Finding efficiencies is tricky enough when you mass-produce widgets. Imagine the challenge for a company whose niche is high-quality guitars — instruments that have to look and sound good enough to tempt buyers away from the better-known Fender and Gibson brands.
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NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | June 11, 2006
The corn is only a few inches tall on farms across Maryland, but agriculture officials already are pointing to signs that this will be a down year for farmers in the state and around the nation. Net farm income in the United States is expected to total $56.2 billion this year, down 22.3 percent from last year, said Keith Collins, the chief economist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. "The coming year will present more of a financial challenge for U.S. agriculture than in recent years," Collins said.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Nearly two months after announcing it would convene a panel to study what it called a "disturbing trend" of declining attendance at NCAA Division I men's lacrosse Championship Weekend, the Intercollegiate Men's Lacrosse Coaches Association has issued recommendations for solving the problem. The group's white paper, which was submitted to the NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Committee on Aug. 3, lists skyrocketing ticket prices (which have nearly doubled in the past seven years, from $60 for an all-session pass in 2006 to $110 in 2013)
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court has cleared the way for states to punish drug companies that refuse to lower prices for those who can't afford the prescriptions. A three-judge panel of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals revived a Maine law that gives the state unprecedented powers to provide lower drug prices for 325,000 residents who lack insurance coverage. The ruling reversed a lower court decision in October. The earlier opinion suspended the law, saying it violated the Constitution's interstate commerce provision.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | July 20, 1992
Cheaper microprocessors are one factor in the latest computer price war. Intel Corp., which has been the dominant supplier of PC microprocessors for the past decade, is being challenged by several rivals who claim to make microprocessors that work the same as or better than Intel's parts but at lower cost.In response, Intel has cut prices sharply and introduced a variety of new chips.Lower prices and competition work to the benefit of computer buyers. But many computer buyers, experienced as well as novice, are concerned about using computers built around microprocessors other than Intel's.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
Wearing a dark, formal suit, Robert Jenkins sat at the wheel of his car for 15 minutes for what most motorists would consider a bargain -- regular gasoline at $1.19.9 a gallon -- but he viewed as a matter of principle.Fourteen vehicles were lined up at the pumps of the Excel gas station and garage in the 1700 block of Taylor Ave. in Parkville on Tuesday, their drivers willing to endure the heat and humidity for a price.Lines have formed there every day since last month, while other stations were charging $1.25.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court yesterday gave manufacturers and wholesalers of consumer goods their first chance to dictate the prices of their products sold to retail customers -- a break with the century-old tradition that condemns price-fixing as illegal under antitrust law.In a ruling that could lead to lower retail prices for buyers of goods varying as widely as newspapers, gasoline, beer, cameras, cosmetics and appliances, the court unanimously overruled...
NEWS
By Staff report | October 6, 1991
Shoppers at George's Superthrift grocery stores should be noticing some changes on the shelves and at the cash register.Instead of Red & White and Our Value products, IGA and First Choice items are going up as the store changes from Superthrift to IGA."I just thought by joining IGA it would help my organization," said owner George Mezar--."The main change will be lower prices -- about 4,000 prices will be lowered, mostly in grocery, dairy and frozen foods."Since he opened his first store in 1963, George's has expanded to six full-size and four convenience stores in Howard, Carroll and Frederick counties, employing about 500 people.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamdin | December 25, 2006
The remarkable rise in house prices in Baltimore is over for now. A steady and sustainable increase in prices is good news for the local economy, but the more than doubling of the average price since 1998 is probably a sign of too much, too fast. What will the fallout be? Most of us will be unscathed, except for the loss of party chatter about how much more our houses are worth this year compared with last. Those holding multiple houses that they purchased more recently, or developers of new properties not yet sold, may find themselves less sanguine.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
On Memorial Day weekends, Kim Yates and Albert Kullman measure success by speed. Yates steers her bright yellow tow truck toward trouble, with the goal of getting disabled vehicles out of the roadway or back in business before traffic has time to clog. From his toll booth at the Bay Bridge, Kullman can make change for a $10 or $20 in under 12 seconds. "We want you on your way," Yates said. "Safely. " The summer season kicks off this weekend when 718,200 Marylanders are expected to leave town for the beach or mountains, 1.2 percent fewer than a year ago, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Chemical maker W.R. Grace & Co. said Wednesday that its net income in the first quarter fell about 13 percent from the year-earlier period, in line with its warning to investors and analysts earlier in the month. The Columbia company said sales volumes didn't drop, but revenue took a hit as a result of lower pricing and an unfavorable change in the Venezuelan exchange rate. "Sales and earnings were below our expectations," CEO Fred Festa said in a statement. W.R. Grace said it produced $52.9 million in net income during the first three months of the year, compared with $60.9 million in the first quarter of last year.
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
More Marylanders will be celebrating July Fourth away from home this year, according to AAA, which is forecasting the steepest increase in travel in more than a decade. An estimated 846,000 Marylanders will travel at least 50 miles to their destinations, a 5.3 percent increase from last year, and the majority will drive, the organization said Thursday. Because the holiday falls on a Wednesday, AAA projected six days of travel — one more than last year. Decreasing gas prices are the likely explanation behind the increase in drivers.
NEWS
By Rafael Corredoira | April 19, 2012
The argument for increasing oil production in the U.S. to decrease gas prices at the pump has sparked passionate debate, but it undervalues the influence of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In recent years, OPEC has shown an ability to manipulate the price of oil around the world, making it unlikely for an increase in U.S. oil production to reduce gas prices. However, this unfortunate fact has a silver lining: OPEC's need to sustain its market base and hold off the alternative energy industry is likely to keep oil prices from skyrocketing.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 19, 2011
If you're getting fewer pitches from outfits selling electricity and natural gas these days, this may be the reason: It's more difficult for independent energy marketers to beat the standard prices from Baltimore Gas & Electric. The expensive electricity deals that BGE signed a few years ago have just about expired. That means customers taking the utility's standard product will no longer be stuck with inflated, 2008 prices. Which means the likes of Washington Gas Energy Services and Viridian Energy can't easily undercut them.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2010
The Ritz-Carlton Residences in Baltimore has lowered its asking prices by about 30 percent on 30 of its 166 unsold high-end condos, a spokesman said Wednesday. The Inner Harbor development, completed two years ago, has struggled to find buyers as demand for homes — luxury ones in particular — plummeted. Just 24 of the 190 units have changed hands; about a dozen more are under contract. Greg Harris, a spokesman for RXR Realty, the developer, said new prices on the units range from $499,000 to $2.1 million.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
It's not too soon to declare the winners of the war in Iraq. In rough order, they are Exxon Mobil, Royal Dutch Shell, Hugo Chavez and Vladimir V. Putin. When U.S. troops invaded Iraq in 2003, a barrel of crude oil sold for $27. On Friday, it was at $77. It makes all the difference. Is the war entirely responsible for the high prices? Of course not. But the run up to what are now near-record prices began just weeks after the U.S. invasion, helped along, somewhat, by the decline in Iraq's production.
FEATURES
By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,N.Y. Times News Service | March 13, 1991
NEW YORK-- When Mary Ann Restivo founded her business her prices rarely topped $400, but little by little they rose, like everyone else's, with inflation.Now she has joined the ranks of designers and manufacturers forced to offer shoppers fashionable clothes at more reasonable prices."Everybody knows people are not spending a lot on clothes, so we decided to go back to where we were when we started 10 years ago," she said.Designers like Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, Donna Karan and Louis Dell'Olio for Anne Klein have accomplished this by adding secondary collections, usually of more casual clothes.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | February 17, 2010
Real estate search engine Trulia, which tracks how many homes listed for sale have had at least one price reduction, said Tuesday that Baltimore continues to have a high share. Higher, in fact, than all but four other big cities. Thirty-one percent of listings in Baltimore are on the market for less than their original asking price. Average price reduction: 12 percent. On a $300,000 house, that's a $36,000 cut. A separate site, HousingTracker.net, has shown a fairly steady drop in typical asking prices in the Baltimore metro area.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
Neighborhood:: The Villages of Montgomery Run Location:: Ellicott City (Howard County) Average sales price:: $200,000 (January through June) Notable features:: This condo community is like many other condo communities, architecturally speaking, but it's got location to recommend it if you want good public schools and quick access to highways. Montgomery Run is cradled between Routes 108 and 100. And it's in the district for Bellows Spring Elementary School, which beats both the state and county overall on test scores for math and reading.
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