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By Tricia Bishop | November 4, 2001
Lower Manhattan, long considered among the world's most energetic areas, has been added to the World Monuments Watch List of the 100 Most Endangered Sites as No. 101 after the Sept. 11 attacks. "Beyond the extraordinary toll on human life, the assault left historic buildings in the vicinity of the World Trade Center vulnerable," representatives of the World Monuments Fund said in a statement. "Technical assistance is urgently needed to assess the architectural integrity of surviving structures."
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
Even in last week's steamy heat, I got the same chill I always get at Ground Zero. The immensity of the physical and emotional hole left by the 9/11 terrorist attack is hard to imagine from afar — you have to actually be there, looking down into the abyss. But the other thing that's hard to imagine from afar is how the sanctity of the site has nothing to do with anything around it. Even two blocks away. That is where the so-called Ground Zero mosque is supposed to be built. So-called because it can no more be considered the "Ground Zero mosque" than, say, the existing New York Dolls Gentlemen's Club one more block away could be considered the "Ground Zero Gentlemen's Club.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jayson Blair and Jayson Blair,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 2002
NEW YORK - Remember when it was just hallowed ground? Ground Zero is now one of the most popular tourism attractions in the city. It is a place where tour guides charge $15 a head to point out the spot where the firefighters raised the flag. The proud can buy twin tower T-shirts, the angry can buy toilet paper bearing the face of Osama bin Laden and the curious can climb the fence to take the perfect picture of what is now just a big hole. The hustle of commerce hawking to the crush of sightseers has prompted some to call it 9/11 World.
FEATURES
November 13, 2007
Nov. 13 1927 The Holland Tunnel opened to the public, providing access between lower Manhattan and New Jersey beneath the Hudson River.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Sarah Koenig and Dan Fesperman, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Sarah Koenig,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2001
NEW YORK -- In the aftermath of even the bleakest of events, there is almost always a turning point, some moment of grace where it finally seems possible that this, too, shall pass. Lower Manhattan's moment seemed to have arrived yesterday afternoon, when word spread at the site of Tuesday's terrorist attack that five city firefighters had just risen from the rubble of the crumbled World Trade Center. Rescue workers cheered. Some chanted, "USA, USA." "We're hoping this news is true," said a heartened Jack Ginty, a lieutenant with the city Fire Department.
FEATURES
November 13, 2007
Nov. 13 1927 The Holland Tunnel opened to the public, providing access between lower Manhattan and New Jersey beneath the Hudson River.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
Even in last week's steamy heat, I got the same chill I always get at Ground Zero. The immensity of the physical and emotional hole left by the 9/11 terrorist attack is hard to imagine from afar — you have to actually be there, looking down into the abyss. But the other thing that's hard to imagine from afar is how the sanctity of the site has nothing to do with anything around it. Even two blocks away. That is where the so-called Ground Zero mosque is supposed to be built. So-called because it can no more be considered the "Ground Zero mosque" than, say, the existing New York Dolls Gentlemen's Club one more block away could be considered the "Ground Zero Gentlemen's Club.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 6, 2003
Baltimore's lone participant in the effort to rebuild Lower Manhattan is still in the running. Roland Park resident Janet Marie Smith is a member of one of the two design teams that were named finalists this week in the international competition held to produce a master plan to guide reconstruction of the 16-acre World Trade Center site destroyed by terror attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Smith is the vice president of planning and development for Baltimore's Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse and previously held the same title with the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
October 24, 2001
SATISFACTION in the course of justice is taken from the sentencing of four disciples of Osama bin Laden to life in prison for roles in the bombing of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998. Last week, in a lower Manhattan courtroom not far from the former World Trade Center, federal District Judge Leonard Sand also ordered each to pay $33 million in damages to victims' families and the U.S. government, expressing hope of extracting it from al-Qaida accounts. The four were caught in an international dragnet, and convicted of conspiracy with bin Laden to kill Americans.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2003
NEW YORK - After months of growing fainter and fainter, the giant titanium cloud that was to have been the Guggenheim Museum on the East River has dissipated completely, victim of the Guggenheim's financial straits and a weak economy. In a three-paragraph e-mail message, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation announced Monday that it had withdrawn its proposal to build a 400-foot-tall building designed by Frank Gehry on Piers 9, 13 and 14, south of the Brooklyn Bridge in Lower Manhattan.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 17, 2004
NEW YORK - The shelves of the Wah Kue hobby shop are almost empty, and the boys who cluster in the back of the barren store are there to show off their collections of Japanese trading cards, not to buy anything. Soon Yee, the co-owner of this Chinatown fixture for the past 20 years, has all but made up his mind to quit the business. "Things are bad in Chinatown since 9/11," says Yee, 49, ringing up a rare sale - a can of soda. "We used to get a lot of tourists. The streets were so crowded, people were bumping into each other."
NEWS
By Errol A. Cockfield Jr. and Errol A. Cockfield Jr.,NEWSDAY | July 4, 2004
When workers hoist a 20-ton slab of Adirondack granite across Ground Zero today to lay the Freedom Tower's cornerstone, they will officially usher in the rebirth of Lower Manhattan. The ceremony will raise the curtain on some of the most ambitious building in the city's history, structures that will transform the 16-acre site into a design postcard with the 1,776-foot Freedom Tower as its focal point. "It represents the beginning of the first commercial redevelopment of the World Trade Center," said Carl Weisbrod, president of the Downtown Alliance, a business group.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | December 20, 2003
NEW YORK - The world's tallest building will be a not-so-subtle evocation of the Statue of Liberty, complete with an off-center spire suggesting the upraised arm that carries the Torch of Freedom. The body of the tower has been designed to "twist and move" as it rises through the sky, the way a human torso might twist when in motion. The top features two tiers of observation decks, in much the same way that Lady Liberty originally had lookout points at her crown and torch. At night, the spire will cast searchlights upward, illuminating the sky like the torch.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
NEW YORK CITY - For those seeking a bold architectural expression of America's resilience after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, it turns out the answer was in plain view all along. The concrete slurry walls that surrounded the World Trade Center's twin towers - and held up when the towers fell, keeping back the Hudson River - will remain exposed on the site as artifacts symbolizing the strength and endurance of American democracy. An office tower rising 1,776 feet - making it the world's tallest - is to rise near the memorial site as a sign of the country's resurgence after the terror attacks.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 6, 2003
Baltimore's lone participant in the effort to rebuild Lower Manhattan is still in the running. Roland Park resident Janet Marie Smith is a member of one of the two design teams that were named finalists this week in the international competition held to produce a master plan to guide reconstruction of the 16-acre World Trade Center site destroyed by terror attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Smith is the vice president of planning and development for Baltimore's Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse and previously held the same title with the Baltimore Orioles.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2003
NEW YORK - After months of growing fainter and fainter, the giant titanium cloud that was to have been the Guggenheim Museum on the East River has dissipated completely, victim of the Guggenheim's financial straits and a weak economy. In a three-paragraph e-mail message, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation announced Monday that it had withdrawn its proposal to build a 400-foot-tall building designed by Frank Gehry on Piers 9, 13 and 14, south of the Brooklyn Bridge in Lower Manhattan.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | December 20, 2003
NEW YORK - The world's tallest building will be a not-so-subtle evocation of the Statue of Liberty, complete with an off-center spire suggesting the upraised arm that carries the Torch of Freedom. The body of the tower has been designed to "twist and move" as it rises through the sky, the way a human torso might twist when in motion. The top features two tiers of observation decks, in much the same way that Lady Liberty originally had lookout points at her crown and torch. At night, the spire will cast searchlights upward, illuminating the sky like the torch.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 17, 2004
NEW YORK - The shelves of the Wah Kue hobby shop are almost empty, and the boys who cluster in the back of the barren store are there to show off their collections of Japanese trading cards, not to buy anything. Soon Yee, the co-owner of this Chinatown fixture for the past 20 years, has all but made up his mind to quit the business. "Things are bad in Chinatown since 9/11," says Yee, 49, ringing up a rare sale - a can of soda. "We used to get a lot of tourists. The streets were so crowded, people were bumping into each other."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | December 19, 2002
NEW YORK - A decade from now, Lower Manhattan could be under a glass dome, the largest covered space in the world. It might feature two adjoining office towers that "kiss and become one," or a double-helix design that evokes human DNA. It could be the setting for a giant power station that makes energy from sunflower seeds - a slap at Middle Eastern oil interests. Those are a few of the ideas presented yesterday by seven world-class design teams selected to propose ways to rebuild Ground Zero, the 16-acre former site of the World Trade Center towers, destroyed in the terror attacks of Sept.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | September 15, 2002
NEW YORK -- The whirlwind hit New York again Sept. 11, just as it did a year ago. On Wednesday, the winds reached 60 miles an hour. Trees fell. Wires collapsed. Construction supplies were blown from rooftops. Wednesday's winds came down from the skies, the heavens. A year ago Sept. 11, they came from the hell that Lower Manhattan turned into that day. The turbulence of heat and vacuum and momentum and combustion from the World Trade Center generated a micro-climate of dust from incinerated bodies and metal and paper and plastic and dreams -- all whipped about by winds that started in the morning and howled all night and that, in some minds, have not stopped to this day. Long ago, a voice appeared from another whirlwind, one in which God asked Job, "Who is this who darkens counsel by words without knowledge?
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