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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 2002
MOSCOW - The lower house of parliament passed legislation yesterday that would offer some young Russian men an alternative to the draft, but only under conditions that liberals and advocates of military reform have called onerous and very possibly dangerous. In a vote that underscored the Russian military's resistance to easing conscription, which is required for all men between the ages of 18 and 27, the lower house voted narrowly to allow conscientious objectors and others who oppose military service on ethnic, moral or religious grounds to apply for alternative service.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 21, 2013
During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march. Last week, the upper house of the Belgian Senate voted to extend a 2002 law legalizing euthanasia for adults so that it includes incurably ill children. The amended law will now have to be voted on by the Parliament's lower house, a vote expected to take place before elections in May, but if passed, writes The New York Times, children afflicted with "constant and unbearable physical suffering" and "equipped with a capacity for discernment" could then be legally euthanized in Belgium.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | May 26, 1993
BERLIN -- The German Parliament's lower house -- driven by economic hard times and the violence they have spawned against foreigners -- votes today on a tough new law that would erase one of the most liberal asylum policies in postwar Europe.Fueled by widespread popular support, the new legislation tightening up controls on refugees and emigres is virtually certain to be passed by the Bundestag, the lower house of the Parliament, and go on to the upper house for final ratification Friday.
NEWS
By Jason Booms | June 20, 2011
Similar to the situation today, confidence in American political institutions was flagging roughly 20 years ago. Our economy was undergoing a recession, and there appeared to be a widening disconnect between our elected officials and the citizenry. The George H.W. Bush administration appeared tone deaf to the pocketbook concerns of many Americans, and Congress was mired in the House banking scandal that further fueled the case for reform. Populist candidates and causes found a very receptive landscape.
NEWS
By Jason Booms | June 20, 2011
Similar to the situation today, confidence in American political institutions was flagging roughly 20 years ago. Our economy was undergoing a recession, and there appeared to be a widening disconnect between our elected officials and the citizenry. The George H.W. Bush administration appeared tone deaf to the pocketbook concerns of many Americans, and Congress was mired in the House banking scandal that further fueled the case for reform. Populist candidates and causes found a very receptive landscape.
NEWS
August 15, 1995
The drawing on the Aug. 12 Saturday Mail Box page incorrectly identified the house in the Maryland Sketchbook as the Hampton Mansion. Actually, it is a drawing of the "Lower House" on the grounds of the Hampton Mansion.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 12, 2005
TOKYO - Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi scored a crushing victory yesterday in legislative elections, giving powerful momentum to his campaign to slim down his nation's bureaucracy. Supporters of Koizumi, a strong U.S. ally, won at least 294 seats in the 480-seat lower house of the Diet, or parliament, according to a vote count tallied early today by the state television network. The huge victory, labeled by one opposition politician as "Typhoon Koizumi," gave the long-ruling Liberal Democratic Party enough seats in the lower house to govern without a coalition partner for the first time in 15 years.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | June 22, 1991
TOKYO -- Takako Doi, who in 1986 became the highest female role-model in Japanese political history but who never found the mainstream, resigned in defeat yesterday as head of her country's biggest opposition party.Ms. Doi was accepting responsibility for a string of electoral defeats capped by a calamitous local election season this spring.The announcement was in bleak contrast to a triumphant August day less than two years ago when the upper house of Japan's parliament made her the first woman ever chosen to be prime minister by either chamber.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 2000
MOSCOW -- President-elect Vladimir V. Putin pushed the long overdue ratification of a major arms control treaty through a compliant lower house of parliament last week. He scored a victory yesterday with Russia's regional bosses in the parliament's upper chamber, easily winning a vote to get rid of a prosecutor who was the scourge of former President Boris N. Yeltsin. For good measure, the upper house also approved the START II nuclear arms pact, which passed the lower house Friday. The most vivid display of loyalty from the governors and local leaders in the Federation Council, as the upper house is called, was their 133-10 vote to dismiss Yuri Skuratov, the general prosecutor whom Yeltsin tried twice to fire last year after he began to investigate corruption in the Kremlin.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 18, 2000
MOSCOW - President Vladimir V. Putin launched a twofold attack on the power of Russia's regional leaders last night, with a plan to banish them from their positions of influence in the capital and to make them ultimately responsible not to the voters who elected them but to himself. Putin wants to remove Russia's governors from the upper house of parliament, telling them they should tend to business in their districts. He also announced last night that he will introduce legislation giving him the power to remove regional leaders as he sees fit. They, in turn, would receive the authority to remove local officials as they choose.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | September 28, 2009
It's never been easy building new homes affordable to people with moderate incomes, but selling them - that's usually a snap. Which is why no one at a Baltimore nonprofit that finished eight townhouses in December expected they'd still be sitting empty today. Demand isn't the problem. It's the credit crunch. With home prices and apartment rents both falling nationwide, it might seem like a good time to get more people into residences that don't overwhelm their monthly budgets. But affordable-housing activists say the reality is just the opposite.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 25, 2009
General Growth Properties has agreed to county planners' request to provide 15 percent of new housing in a redeveloped downtown Columbia for people who make $80,000 or less annually, but company leaders are resisting another key county suggestion. The firm's executives went before the county Planning Board on Thursday evening at Wilde Lake High School to answer questions raised during the company's presentation two weeks ago and to listen to testimony from residents. "It's all the crossing of i's and the dotting of t's, as you would expect," said Greg Hamm, senior vice president and Columbia general manager for General Growth, Columbia's developer.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 12, 2005
TOKYO - Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi scored a crushing victory yesterday in legislative elections, giving powerful momentum to his campaign to slim down his nation's bureaucracy. Supporters of Koizumi, a strong U.S. ally, won at least 294 seats in the 480-seat lower house of the Diet, or parliament, according to a vote count tallied early today by the state television network. The huge victory, labeled by one opposition politician as "Typhoon Koizumi," gave the long-ruling Liberal Democratic Party enough seats in the lower house to govern without a coalition partner for the first time in 15 years.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2005
Long-debated changes in Howard County's beleaguered moderate-income housing program could reach the County Council in September or October, according to Marsha S. McLaughlin, the county planning director. Although the precise changes are not certain, McLaughlin said the idea is to provide options for developers who complain that soaring home prices are making it hard to build moderate-income homes next to townhouses selling for $500,000 and more. "We don't mind providing flexibility to the development community," said McLaughlin, as long as the county gets more lower-priced housing units in exchange.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
Howard County developers are pressing for another way to satisfy their moderate-income housing obligations, claiming they can't afford to build middle-income homes amid the luxury units they are selling for record-high prices. A group of nearly a dozen developers and lawyers, along with a representative from the Homebuilders Association of Maryland, met with county planning and housing officials and asked for permission to pay the county fees instead of building the homes, participants said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 2002
MOSCOW - The lower house of parliament passed legislation yesterday that would offer some young Russian men an alternative to the draft, but only under conditions that liberals and advocates of military reform have called onerous and very possibly dangerous. In a vote that underscored the Russian military's resistance to easing conscription, which is required for all men between the ages of 18 and 27, the lower house voted narrowly to allow conscientious objectors and others who oppose military service on ethnic, moral or religious grounds to apply for alternative service.
NEWS
By Adam B. Ellick and Adam B. Ellick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2001
PRAGUE, Czech Republic - In the past three weeks, Tereza Engelova has left the newsroom of state-run Czech Television only twice. She has eaten in the conference room, slept on the editing suite floor and used a portable toilet in the audio suite. It is something more than dedication to a story. Engelova is one of about 40 journalists who went on strike Dec. 23 and seized the TV newsroom to protest the appointment of a new general manager, Jiri Hodac. They accused Hodac of representing the political interests of a former prime minister, Vaclav Klaus, and of compromising the station's independence.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 21, 2013
During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march. Last week, the upper house of the Belgian Senate voted to extend a 2002 law legalizing euthanasia for adults so that it includes incurably ill children. The amended law will now have to be voted on by the Parliament's lower house, a vote expected to take place before elections in May, but if passed, writes The New York Times, children afflicted with "constant and unbearable physical suffering" and "equipped with a capacity for discernment" could then be legally euthanized in Belgium.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2001
Worried about the effect of proposed increases in development impact fees on affordable new housing, a county delegate and housing advocates urged the County Council last night to amend the legislation to make it easier for first-time, low-income residents to buy a house. The proposed increase in impact fees, recommended to County Executive Janet S. Owens by a panel of builders, residents and business owners, would mark the first restructuring since the fees were introduced in 1987 as a way to cover costs for new roads and schools arising from fast-paced home construction.
NEWS
By Adam B. Ellick and Adam B. Ellick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2001
PRAGUE, Czech Republic - In the past three weeks, Tereza Engelova has left the newsroom of state-run Czech Television only twice. She has eaten in the conference room, slept on the editing suite floor and used a portable toilet in the audio suite. It is something more than dedication to a story. Engelova is one of about 40 journalists who went on strike Dec. 23 and seized the TV newsroom to protest the appointment of a new general manager, Jiri Hodac. They accused Hodac of representing the political interests of a former prime minister, Vaclav Klaus, and of compromising the station's independence.
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