Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLower East Side
IN THE NEWS

Lower East Side

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Gavin DeGraw has cancelled eight more dates on his tour because of an assault he suffered in New York City this past Sunday. But he will be able to open for Maroon 5 and Train when they play Merriweather Post Pavilion August 24 , DeGraw's publicist just announced. DeGraw cancelled the other dates because of doctors' orders to take time to recuperate from injuries he sustained as a result of an attack by a group of assailants Sunday night in the Lower East Side. The singer was released from Bellevue hospital on Tuesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Gavin DeGraw has cancelled eight more dates on his tour because of an assault he suffered in New York City this past Sunday. But he will be able to open for Maroon 5 and Train when they play Merriweather Post Pavilion August 24 , DeGraw's publicist just announced. DeGraw cancelled the other dates because of doctors' orders to take time to recuperate from injuries he sustained as a result of an attack by a group of assailants Sunday night in the Lower East Side. The singer was released from Bellevue hospital on Tuesday.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 1997
When "Rent" triumphantly moved from off-Broadway to Broadway in 1996, this rock opera about la vie boheme on New York's Lower East Side was embraced by bourgeois uptown theatergoers who didn't blink at the high-rent ticket prices."
NEWS
April 9, 2010
City officials backed by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake are to be applauded for moving ahead with plans to create a new arts and entertainment district on Baltimore's West Side near downtown. The area has been pegged for redevelopment as a cultural hub for more than a decade, but the pace of change has been disappointing. Anything that helps jump-start the process is all to the good. One might well ask why the area even needs a formal designation as an arts and entertainment district, given the ambitious renovation of the Hippodrome Theatre (which re-opened on the west side in 2003)
NEWS
April 9, 2010
City officials backed by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake are to be applauded for moving ahead with plans to create a new arts and entertainment district on Baltimore's West Side near downtown. The area has been pegged for redevelopment as a cultural hub for more than a decade, but the pace of change has been disappointing. Anything that helps jump-start the process is all to the good. One might well ask why the area even needs a formal designation as an arts and entertainment district, given the ambitious renovation of the Hippodrome Theatre (which re-opened on the west side in 2003)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2001
NEW YORK - The Lower East Side, known for densely packed tenements that housed successive waves of Irish, Italian, German, Eastern European and Chinese immigrants rather than for monumental buildings, has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The Lower East Side Business Improvement District and the Lower East Side Conservancy, which co-sponsored the application, recently announced the awarding of the designation. While it does not restrict what owners can do with their property, the designation offers substantial tax credits to those who meet preservation guidelines.
TRAVEL
By GARY GATELY and GARY GATELY,SPECIAL TO SUN | March 23, 2001
In New York Harbor, the wind churns the charcoal waters into a froth. I stand shoulder-to-shoulder with hundreds of others on the ferry's deck, shivering. Today, we huddled masses, yearning to be warm, carry cameras and coffees and tote bags, but imagine other journeys, not across a harbor, but across an ocean. Cover:The ferry approaches Ellis Island, and all eyes focus on the main building, with its brick-and-limestone Beaux Arts facade, big arched windows and copper-topped turrets poking into the sky. As we cross the gangplank, it seems fitting that the latest arrivals chatter not only in English, but in Spanish, German, Italian, Japanese.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
NEW YORK -- Behind the facade caked with soot, beyond the peeling burlap wallpaper in the hall, the dimly lit rooms at 97 Orchard St. offer a glimpse of the sequel to the Ellis Island story.From Ellis Island, where they landed, new immigrants to the United States used to head to this six-story tenement or to buildings much like it. Over the decades, 97 Orchard St. would house more than 10,000 people from about 20 countries -- in apartments without electricity or running water.Now the building is the centerpiece of the Lower East Side Tenement Museum.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 1996
George Burns, the beloved cigar-puffing comedian whose career spanned vaudeville, radio, movies and television, died yesterday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif.Mr. Burns, 100, was the foremost comic "straight man" of his time in a partnership with his late wife, the scatterbrained Gracie Allen. He began a new solo career in show business when he was nearly 80.When he was well into his 90s, Mr. Burns announced with his customary brio that he had arranged to celebrate his 100th birthday, on Jan. 20, 1996, with an engagement at the London Palladium.
NEWS
By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
NEW YORK - They were once joined at the hip in the heart of New York's Lower East Side, two identical brick tenements offering cheap, dimly lit apartments to waves of immigrants from all over the world. But they came to play different roles in the community: One was turned into a museum celebrating the area's immigrant history. The other is home to 15 families, as well as a popular Chinese restaurant on the ground floor. And now, in a move that has some shaking their heads, the museum is attempting to evict the people who live and work next door - many of them immigrants - so it can expand and accommodate more tourists.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2001
NEW YORK - The Lower East Side, known for densely packed tenements that housed successive waves of Irish, Italian, German, Eastern European and Chinese immigrants rather than for monumental buildings, has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The Lower East Side Business Improvement District and the Lower East Side Conservancy, which co-sponsored the application, recently announced the awarding of the designation. While it does not restrict what owners can do with their property, the designation offers substantial tax credits to those who meet preservation guidelines.
TRAVEL
By GARY GATELY and GARY GATELY,SPECIAL TO SUN | March 23, 2001
In New York Harbor, the wind churns the charcoal waters into a froth. I stand shoulder-to-shoulder with hundreds of others on the ferry's deck, shivering. Today, we huddled masses, yearning to be warm, carry cameras and coffees and tote bags, but imagine other journeys, not across a harbor, but across an ocean. Cover:The ferry approaches Ellis Island, and all eyes focus on the main building, with its brick-and-limestone Beaux Arts facade, big arched windows and copper-topped turrets poking into the sky. As we cross the gangplank, it seems fitting that the latest arrivals chatter not only in English, but in Spanish, German, Italian, Japanese.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 1997
When "Rent" triumphantly moved from off-Broadway to Broadway in 1996, this rock opera about la vie boheme on New York's Lower East Side was embraced by bourgeois uptown theatergoers who didn't blink at the high-rent ticket prices."
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
NEW YORK -- Behind the facade caked with soot, beyond the peeling burlap wallpaper in the hall, the dimly lit rooms at 97 Orchard St. offer a glimpse of the sequel to the Ellis Island story.From Ellis Island, where they landed, new immigrants to the United States used to head to this six-story tenement or to buildings much like it. Over the decades, 97 Orchard St. would house more than 10,000 people from about 20 countries -- in apartments without electricity or running water.Now the building is the centerpiece of the Lower East Side Tenement Museum.
NEWS
October 16, 1995
Henry Roth, 89, who in 1934 wrote "Call It Sleep," a novel acclaimed as an American classic for its powerful portrayal of a Jewish immigrant boy struggling to survive in the slums of the Lower East Side, died Friday in Albuquerque, N.M. In 1964, "Call It Sleep" was published in paperback by Avon Books and went on to sell more than a million copies.William J. Koslo, 65, the Diamond International chief executive officer who negotiated the company's $400 million sale to Sir James Goldsmith in 1982, died Thursday in Mineola, N.Y., following a stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | May 16, 2012
On Sunday, in conjunction with its ongoing exhbition Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity , the Jewish Museum will present " Knish History 101: Life and Times of the Knish" a lecture by Laura Siilver titledĀ  Silver will tell everyone all about the knish, that lovable, humble stuffed hunk of dough. Guests are invited to show up with their knish memories, recipes and recollections and listen to knish tales from the Midwest, the Lower East SIde and the Polish town of Knyszyn, where Silver traces her roots.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.