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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
If Horace Greeley were a rockfish fisherman this spring, his advice to Baltimore-Annapolis area anglers would be to "go south."The Department of Natural Resources, which monitors rockfish action through citations issued and catch reports from tackle shops and charter-boat centers, reports the early days of the season have been providing fabulous fishing."
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay's health improved last year, University of Maryland scientists reported Wednesday, and the leader of the troubled estuary's annual checkup said he sees signs the cleanup effort is making progress. The bay's overall health earned a 'C' grade for 2012, up from a D-plus the year before, according to the analysis by UM's Center for Environmental Science. Most indicators of bay water quality and biological vitality increased, said William Dennison, the center's vice president for science applications.
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SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | June 5, 1994
"Fish on!...Another!...Grab that third rod!," shouted Captain Eddie Davis over the rumble of the boat's engines.Dick Broden tossed a ham and Swiss on rye aside and sprang for one rod, Dick Becker dropped a soda can and lunged for the second rod. I ripped off a last bite of fried chicken and grabbed the third rod. Three blues at once.Earlier reports of decent bluefishing in the lower portion ofMaryland's Chesapeake Bay demanded an inspection trip last Wednesday. Fishing aboard Davis' 42-foot Edith Rose out of Ridge, near Point Lookout, confirmed all the rumors.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
In rare good news for the Chesapeake Bay, scientists reported Wednesday that underwater grasses made significant gains last year in the beleaguered estuary, growing thickly enough in the upper bay to visibly clear the water while continuing to rebound in the lower bay. Aerial surveys found that the grasses had spread across nearly 12,000 additional acres of bottom last year, an increase of 18 percent from 2007, according to the Chesapeake Bay Program, the...
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
RIDGE -- At the mouth of Smith Creek, Capt. Eddie Davis throttled down the Edith Rose, and Willie Dean, a St. Mary's County menhaden fisherman, brought his skiff alongside as Davis went to the rail of his charter boat with four empty bushel baskets.Dean, wearing chest waders and a hat that read, "Thou shalt not kill . . . unless," slogged across the bottom of his skiff, nearly knee deep in his day's catch, and with a long-handled net filled the bushel baskets with wriggling menhaden."Can't get it much fresher than this, can you now?"
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | April 14, 1991
"They're on their way, captain," shouted Bruce Scheible over what sounded like a cordless phone. "They were off the Rappahannock this past weekend, and there is a big school of them coming past the bridge tunnel, even as we speak."If you hadn't guessed, "they" are bluefish.Bruce added that the fish caught in the lower bay were between 8 and 15 pounds.Bruce runs Scheible's Fishing Center near Ridge, Md., and specializes in chumming bluefish for his patrons. His fleet offishing boats includes both charter and head boats.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
In another blow for Maryland's beleaguered watermen, scientists say that the Chesapeake Bay's oysters are sick and dying again, less than a year after they seemed to be recovering from a seven-year bout with parasitic diseases.Spurred by the summer's drought, which made the bay's water much saltier than usual, the oyster diseases MSX and Dermo have returned with a vengeance.Oysters throughout the bay are infected with one or the other disease. Hardest hit is the lower bay, where MSX already has killed off more than half of the population, scientists say."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
In rare good news for the Chesapeake Bay, scientists reported Wednesday that underwater grasses made significant gains last year in the beleaguered estuary, growing thickly enough in the upper bay to visibly clear the water while continuing to rebound in the lower bay. Aerial surveys found that the grasses had spread across nearly 12,000 additional acres of bottom last year, an increase of 18 percent from 2007, according to the Chesapeake Bay Program, the...
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 28, 1994
For several weeks, an experienced recreational crabber in my part of the world has been setting his trotline down toward the creek mouth and getting mixed results. A bushel one day, a dozen or two the next several days.The season, he says, is way behind this year and he can't figure the rhyme or reason of it.The reason apparently is as simple as it is uncontrollable, says William P. Jensen of the Department of Natural Resources Tidewater Fisheries Division."We think of the blue crab as the ultimate biological animal," Jensen said yesterday.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay's health improved last year, University of Maryland scientists reported Wednesday, and the leader of the troubled estuary's annual checkup said he sees signs the cleanup effort is making progress. The bay's overall health earned a 'C' grade for 2012, up from a D-plus the year before, according to the analysis by UM's Center for Environmental Science. Most indicators of bay water quality and biological vitality increased, said William Dennison, the center's vice president for science applications.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
The Chesapeake Bay once again got a poor grade from the largest regional environmental watchdog group, a rating pushed further downward from last year's score due to increased phosphorus pollution, decreased water clarity and fewer blue crabs. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation put out its annual State of the Bay report yesterday, two days before the governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia hold their annual bay meeting. The foundation gave the estuary a score of 28, which translated to a "D."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2000
OLIVET -- The view of Solomons Harbor from Page Joy's septic drainfield could hardly be more picturesque, but the pristine water that laps the shore in winter can turn funky in the summer. "I don't go out on the water anymore. In the summertime down here, it's terrible," says Joy. Scum clogs the cove behind his house, he says, and "green-looking fuzzy stuff" grows on the bottom of the boats. Scientists say those are telltale signs of an algal bloom, the product of nitrogen pollution linked to the high density of septic systems along the shores of the harbor at the southern tip of Calvert County.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
RIDGE -- As the Miss Valerie II ran through the darkness and rounded Point Lookout early last week, a trail of luminescence spread across the wake, a pair of shooting stars sped toward the horizon and, well to the south, a cloud bank sparkled with heat lightning.But the light show of a hot summer evening on the lower bay where the Chesapeake mixes with the Potomac River lacked the intensity of the fireworks that had started a couple of hours earlier, just before sunset."I have been fishing this part of the bay for a lot of years, but I never have seen croaker like these," said Don Martin, as he stood along the gunwale, catching a bare hint of warm breeze after a hot evening of bottom fishing.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
If Horace Greeley were a rockfish fisherman this spring, his advice to Baltimore-Annapolis area anglers would be to "go south."The Department of Natural Resources, which monitors rockfish action through citations issued and catch reports from tackle shops and charter-boat centers, reports the early days of the season have been providing fabulous fishing."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
For reservoir anglers, this is the time of spring when fishing at Prettyboy, Loch Raven, Liberty or Piney Run can be packed with action.Crappie are in the coves at Liberty, Piney Run and Loch Raven, and white perch action is picking up at Prettyboy as the fish prepare to spawn.Best crappie action is on fish holding in 12- to 20-foot depths, where small minnows will work well.In addition to panfish action, stripers up to 33 pounds have been taken at Liberty and a 16-pound-plus hybrid was taken at Prettyboy.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
Hurricane Bertha made a mess of fishing conditions along Maryland's Atlantic Coast last weekend, roiling the back bays and keeping the deep sea fishing boats at the docks.But as dozens of offshore fishermen make final preparations for the start of the O.C. Tuna Tournament, reports are that with Bertha's passing the waters over the canyons again are producing tuna.The word yesterday from the O.C. Fishing Center, where the tournament is headquartered, was that "everything has settled down nicely, and the few boats that have been out this week already are catching tuna again."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | October 13, 1994
ROCKFISHThe recreational season for rockfish has been extended through Nov. 22, according to the Department of Natural Resources, and until the cold snap this week, it seemed it might take that long for bay water temperatures to cool and for stripers to start to school.However, cold nights are dropping the water temperature quickly and rockfish action should be improving.In the Chesapeake Bay above the bay bridges, good choices for rockfish are holes and humps at the following locations: Poole's Island, Craihill Light, Snake Reef, Tea Kettle Shoals, Worton Point, Love Point, 7-Foot Knoll and the Dumping Grounds.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | September 13, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening agreed last night to change his proposed crabbing restrictions in a bid to ease the economic bite on Maryland watermen.Officials said the changes still would protect Chesapeake Bay's blue crab population, which has been under pressure in recent years, raising fears that the species is in danger of depletion.Responding to complaints from watermen and seafood industry officials, the governor agreed to amend his original proposal, which called for barring commercial and recreational crabbing two days a week this fall, starting Friday.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
RIDGE -- At the mouth of Smith Creek, Capt. Eddie Davis throttled down the Edith Rose, and Willie Dean, a St. Mary's County menhaden fisherman, brought his skiff alongside as Davis went to the rail of his charter boat with four empty bushel baskets.Dean, wearing chest waders and a hat that read, "Thou shalt not kill . . . unless," slogged across the bottom of his skiff, nearly knee deep in his day's catch, and with a long-handled net filled the bushel baskets with wriggling menhaden."Can't get it much fresher than this, can you now?"
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1996
With the best Chesapeake Bay rockfish angling currently found south of the Patuxent River, a good alternative area for bridge, pier and surf fishermen and those with small boats is the Assateague shoreline and the back bays behind Ocean City.Fisheries biologists, tackle store owners and fishermen who have been there this spring are saying the fishing there is the best it has been in several years.With water conditions reported as very clear and much of the back-bay structure visible, casters and drift fishermen have been enjoying near-perfect conditions.
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