Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLow Vision
IN THE NEWS

Low Vision

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 28, 1991
Dr. Lisa Anderson has joined Annapolis Opticians as the firm's in-house optometrist. A specialist in contact lens fitting and low-vision problems, she also sees patients at the Johns Hopkins Low Vision Service in Baltimore.Anderson recently completed a one-year fellowship program at Johns Hopkins, and is interested in expanding Annapolis Opticians' services to low-vision patients, working in conjunction with owner Doug Corby, who specializes in glasses for people with low vision.A member of the American Optometric Association, Anderson lives in Columbia with her husband.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Susan Kennedy | September 29, 2013
Last October, I started therapy. Not physical or psychotherapy but Orientation and Mobility (O&M) therapy. O&M is when a person with a visual impairment learns skills for independent travel, including how to use a white cane. October is Blindness Awareness Month, and I'd like to share my experience with you. Blindness is not an absolute. Light perception, peripheral and central vision, and blind spots differ from person to person. I live in the gray space of low vision between the light of sight and the darkness of full blindness.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 14, 1997
An eye doctor says my mother has "low vision" caused by macular degeneration, and there's nothing more doctors can do for her. What can she do for herself?While the doctor may be correct that no medical treatment or surgery can restore your mother's vision, much can be done to enhance the sight she has and quality of life.Macular degeneration (a breakdown of nerve cells in the center of the retina responsible for central vision and seeing fine detail), has impaired your mother's ability to see anything she looks at directly.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 6, 2012
Anderson Cooper recently shared a picture of himself on Instagram with a patch over one of his eyes after he was blinded while on assignment off the coast of Portugal. The CNN host said UV light bounced off the water and burned his eye, resulting in 36 hours of blindness in one eye. "I wake up in the middle of the night and it feels like my eyes are on fire," People Magazine reported he said. Janet Sunness, a retina and low vision specialist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson, said it is likely the ultraviolet light burned Cooper's cornea.
NEWS
June 24, 2002
The SPRING Ellicott City Insighters will meet from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. July 9 at Ellicott City Senior Center to hear a short presentation and view the Senior Outreach Low Vision Exhibit. The exhibit features items that can help people with low vision live independently. Group members also will share their experiences and offer support. The group meets weekly. New members are welcome. Registration is requested. SPRING, a peer support program of the Department of Citizen Services' Office on Aging, is an acronym for Senior Peer Resources, Individuals, Networks and Groups.
NEWS
September 13, 1992
FLow Vision Section gets Dr. FullerDr. Barry Fuller, president of Vision Associates, of Harford and Cecil counties, has joined the American Optometric Association's Low Vision Section.Doctors of optometry specializing in low-vision care comprise this section. People with low vision are legally blind and cannot be treated with conventional eyewear or contact lenses, but can be helped with special appliances.Mildred Wernet Boyd, of Bel Air, associate professor of nursing and academic programs specialist at Essex Community College, is participating in the "Leaders" program, part of the National Institute for Leadership Development for women administrators and faculty sponsored by the American Association of Women in Community and Junior Colleges.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and By Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Three years ago, when the vision in her right eye started to become cloudy, 85-year-old Georgia Just didn't know what was happening. She'd had the same pair of glasses for years and had never had any serious problems with her eyesight. Suddenly faces were blurry, household tasks were increasingly difficult, and reading and watching television were impossible. A retinal specialist told her she had developed a blood clot behind her eye. Laser surgery helped stabilize her remaining eyesight, but couldn't restore the vision she'd lost.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
Vision problems short of blindness are one of the most daunting disabilities facing seniors. Despite advances in laser eye surgery and other technologies to perfect the vision of the young, there are few answers for conditions that affect older people. Because of these difficulties, the operators of a new nonprofit vision center in Savage hope to make their center an important stop for many older Howard County residents with uncorrectable visual impairments. It is one of the few places between Baltimore and Washington to offer help with tools to cope with such disabilities, which experts say will affect hundreds of thousands of seniors in coming years.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
Eye exhibit opens today at Enoch Pratt Free Library A traveling eye exhibit is set to open today at Enoch Pratt Free Library's central location, 400 Cathedral St. The exhibit from the National Eye Institute will include causes of low vision, devices and other aids that can help vision, and information on local services and resources. The opening ceremony is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. and is open and free to the public.
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
Tiffany L. Chan, O.D., an instructor of ophthalmology at Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Medicine, is seeing patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Bel Air (formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Center). Chan specializes in visual function and rehabilitation to optimize the remaining sight of patients with chronic vision impairment. Chan received her undergraduate training at the University of California, Davis and her optometric degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry.
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
Tiffany L. Chan, O.D., an instructor of ophthalmology at Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Medicine, is seeing patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Bel Air (formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Center). Chan specializes in visual function and rehabilitation to optimize the remaining sight of patients with chronic vision impairment. Chan received her undergraduate training at the University of California, Davis and her optometric degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE BEASLEY AND JENNIFER SKALKA and STEPHANIE BEASLEY AND JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTERS | July 1, 2006
Kristen Cox remembers failing her eye test in the fifth grade. Though she was fittted for eyeglasses, she knew her vision -- and her world -- was changing. Because around the same time, Cox, a Republican selected this week to run for lieutenant governor with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., noticed that when she would look up at the night sky, the stars would disappear. She started to think that's what stars do -- vanish. But she and her family soon learned that she had Stargardt disease. It was her vision that was fading.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
Eye exhibit opens today at Enoch Pratt Free Library A traveling eye exhibit is set to open today at Enoch Pratt Free Library's central location, 400 Cathedral St. The exhibit from the National Eye Institute will include causes of low vision, devices and other aids that can help vision, and information on local services and resources. The opening ceremony is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. and is open and free to the public.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
Vision problems short of blindness are one of the most daunting disabilities facing seniors. Despite advances in laser eye surgery and other technologies to perfect the vision of the young, there are few answers for conditions that affect older people. Because of these difficulties, the operators of a new nonprofit vision center in Savage hope to make their center an important stop for many older Howard County residents with uncorrectable visual impairments. It is one of the few places between Baltimore and Washington to offer help with tools to cope with such disabilities, which experts say will affect hundreds of thousands of seniors in coming years.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and By Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Three years ago, when the vision in her right eye started to become cloudy, 85-year-old Georgia Just didn't know what was happening. She'd had the same pair of glasses for years and had never had any serious problems with her eyesight. Suddenly faces were blurry, household tasks were increasingly difficult, and reading and watching television were impossible. A retinal specialist told her she had developed a blood clot behind her eye. Laser surgery helped stabilize her remaining eyesight, but couldn't restore the vision she'd lost.
NEWS
June 24, 2002
The SPRING Ellicott City Insighters will meet from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. July 9 at Ellicott City Senior Center to hear a short presentation and view the Senior Outreach Low Vision Exhibit. The exhibit features items that can help people with low vision live independently. Group members also will share their experiences and offer support. The group meets weekly. New members are welcome. Registration is requested. SPRING, a peer support program of the Department of Citizen Services' Office on Aging, is an acronym for Senior Peer Resources, Individuals, Networks and Groups.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 6, 2012
Anderson Cooper recently shared a picture of himself on Instagram with a patch over one of his eyes after he was blinded while on assignment off the coast of Portugal. The CNN host said UV light bounced off the water and burned his eye, resulting in 36 hours of blindness in one eye. "I wake up in the middle of the night and it feels like my eyes are on fire," People Magazine reported he said. Janet Sunness, a retina and low vision specialist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson, said it is likely the ultraviolet light burned Cooper's cornea.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
The Howard County Office on Aging and the Easter Seal Society for Disabled Children and Adults Inc. are joining forces to launch an $85,000 vision program for seniors with premature sight loss.The Low Vision Rehabilitation Program will be introduced by Easter Seal and county officials at a kick-off reception this morningat Florence Bain Senior Center in Columbia.The program is designed to help the county's fast-growing elderly population, many of whom are forced to deal with a loss of vision -- often caused by strokes, glaucoma, and various diseases.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
The Howard County Office on Aging and the Easter Seal Society for Disabled Children and Adults Inc. are joining forces to launch an $85,000 vision program for seniors with premature sight loss.The Low Vision Rehabilitation Program will be introduced by Easter Seal and county officials at a kick-off reception this morningat Florence Bain Senior Center in Columbia.The program is designed to help the county's fast-growing elderly population, many of whom are forced to deal with a loss of vision -- often caused by strokes, glaucoma, and various diseases.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 14, 1997
An eye doctor says my mother has "low vision" caused by macular degeneration, and there's nothing more doctors can do for her. What can she do for herself?While the doctor may be correct that no medical treatment or surgery can restore your mother's vision, much can be done to enhance the sight she has and quality of life.Macular degeneration (a breakdown of nerve cells in the center of the retina responsible for central vision and seeing fine detail), has impaired your mother's ability to see anything she looks at directly.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.