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BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Baltimore-area home sales rose 14 percent in September compared with a year ago -- thanks primarily to low mortgage rates, the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors reported."
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HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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BUSINESS
By Mark Kollar and Mark Kollar,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 22, 1992
CHICAGO -- The dramatic rise in U.S. housing starts during February shows that consumers were rushing to take advantage of a relatively low interest rate environment, economists said.Also, good weather conditions and expectations that first-time home buyers may receive tax credits increased demand in the housing industry, they said.The Commerce Department Tuesday said housing starts rose 9.6 percent in February to a seasonally adjusted 1.304 million units, the highest level since March 1990.
NEWS
By David Horsey | May 6, 2014
After six decades of doing business in California, Toyota is moving its North American headquarters to Texas. That means 3,000 of the carmaker's jobs will be leaving Torrance and going to Plano, perhaps convincing California officials they should stop Texas Gov. Rick Perry at the border the next time he attempts to come to the Golden State for another raid on businesses. Toyota's surprise relocation will throw more gasoline on the burning argument about which state is a better economic model for the nation. California and Texas, two giant, powerhouse states that could stand on their own among the world's biggest economies, are seen as the perfect contrast between a high-regulation blue state and a low regulation red state.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | August 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- For most of this decade, buyers of homes and businesses enjoyed "easy" credit, allowing them to get low-interest loans with few questions asked. Suddenly, credit has become "tight." That means people with spotty credit records are no longer getting mortgages, the largest home borrowers are paying higher interest rates, and some corporate buyouts are in jeopardy. The changes have spooked financial markets, sending the benchmark Dow Jones industrial average last week more than 1,000 points below the record 14,121.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 31, 1993
With government spending rejected as a stimulus, Americans have become dependent on low interest rates to revive the economy. But low rates alone cannot expand the economy any faster than the slow pace at which it is now growing.Housing and auto sales have risen as a result of low rates, which make financing more affordable, and retail sales have also benefited. But a wide range of economists, executives and industry experts say that low rates cannot alone squeeze much more out of these key industries, unless obstacles like wage stagnation and high prices of some homes are overcome.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
Spurred by attractive interest rates and improved consumer confidence, new-home sales in the Baltimore region were up 16 percent to 2,259 units during the third quarter -- the third consecutive quarterly increase, according to a housing market profile released yesterday by Legg Mason Realty Group Inc."Those low rates are making homes more affordable," said Harvey N. Singer, the group's senior vice president. "People have been wanting to buy houses."The survey, which tracks new-home sales in subdivisions of 20 or more houses in Baltimore and five surrounding counties, showed the biggest growth in townhouse sales, which grew 30.8 percent during the quarter compared with the same period a year ago.Detached-house sales were up 15.5 percent, and sales of multifamily units, such as condominiums, were down 9.5 percent, the survey said.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 22, 2009
When it comes to the duration of fixed-income investments, many experts advise investors to keep it short. Interest-rate yields are likely to remain stuck at low levels for a while. Once the economy starts to recover, however, inflation can be expected to revive and bring with it higher interest rates. That's why, experts say, you shouldn't lock in today's rates for too long. "Most people feel - and we agree - that at the back end of this recession there will be pressure on interest rates to move higher," said William Hornbarger, fixed-income strategist for Wachovia Securities.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
Low mortgage interest rates and financial assistance packages encouraged homebuying in February, boosting sales in the Baltimore area by 9 percent, the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors said yesterday.For the month, 852 homes sold, compared with 781 during the same period a year ago. The average sales price fell 4 percent to $118,729, the board said. "The market has remained steady throughout metropolitan Baltimore and is certain to continue in the next months," said Adam D. Cockey Jr., president of the Realtors' board.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
John David Kromkowski learned about compound interest as a youngster with the help of a passbook savings account at the bank. "Every time you went in, they would calculate the interest for you and put it in the book," the 49-year-old Baltimore County lawyer recalls. "It made me feel like, 'I'm making money here.'" Now, Kromkowski wants his son to learn about the miracle of compounding — earning interest on interest. The problem: Savings accounts pay so little interest now that compounding is negligible.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
Baltimore City principals are criticizing interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards' decision to hold them accountable for high rates of chronic absenteeism among their students. The principals say it's the parents' fault if children don't come to class and that schools can't be expected to fix all the problems in students' homes that keep them from showing up. But while it's certainly true that some parents are lax about getting their kids to school and need to shape up, that doesn't mean principals are justified in simply throwing up their hands and insisting there's nothing more they can do. The manner and timing of Ms. Edwards' action left much to be desired - she put a third of city principals on performance improvement plans without much warning and with only three months left in the school year - but the policy is spot-on.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
Last week, top officials in Baltimore County stood together to proudly announce that the homicide rate there was at its lowest level since Jimmy Carter was president. This week, top officials in the Baltimore City Police Department had to answer questions from City Council members about why homicides there were once again on the rise. For a host of reasons, comparing the two isn't really fair, but it is instructive to look at what has driven the drop in homicides in the county to see what could apply to the very different circumstances of the city.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Shirley Kane didn't think she could take it any more. Her 87-year-old mother, diagnosed with terminal cancer, was bedridden at home. Kane was the only person feeding her, sorting out her medications, keeping her clean. The job was so overwhelming that she abandoned her own activities, forsook her own health needs and sank into depression. "They say the caregiver goes first," Kane says. "I almost felt like I didn't want to live anymore. " Then the 64-year-old did something studies show is exceptional among her fellow African-Americans.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Now that the debt limit has been raised, government workers are back to work and the proverbial budgetary can has been kicked a couple of months down the road, the obvious question is, what's next? After venting his spleen a bit over "manufactured crises" today, President Barack Obama offered three items for the congressional agenda - find a balanced approach to the budget, finish immigration reform and pass a farm bill. Yes, they sound familiar and, of course, all three have been stuck in congressional gridlock and the odds of any one of them passing seems long, but - and not to be too Pollyannaish about this - they represent a good starting point.
NEWS
By Martha Holleman | September 1, 2013
Labor Day weekend - the annual celebration of the American worker and our last summer fling - seems also a fitting time to review the state of working Baltimore. The facts are these: •Baltimore City's unemployment rate, as of July, is 10.8 percent. That's almost 4 percentage points higher than the state's rate (at 7.1 percent) and equates to some 30,700 adults who are actively seeking work to support their families. •When added together with those who are no longer seeking work, according to the U.S. Census/American Community Survey, a full 46 percent of the city's adults between ages 16 and 64 are either unemployed or out of the labor force altogether.
NEWS
By Christopher B. Summers | July 18, 2013
To paraphrase the British author Samuel Johnson, nothing focuses the mind like an imminent election. After raising billions in new taxes during Gov. Martin O'Malley's tenure, state legislators have begun focusing their minds on next year's election and how best to retain their jobs. Judging from recent public comments, top lawmakers have decided the best way is to cut taxes just before voters go to the polls. In April, House Speaker Mike Busch, a Democrat, suggested, "If there's an increase in revenues that results [from economic growth]
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | August 18, 2011
Mortgage giant Freddie Max reports the interest rate on 30-year mortgages have fallen to their lowest levels in more than 50 years. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.15 percent for the week ending today.  A 15-year fixed rate loan fell to 3.36 percent. Freddie Mac's chief economist credits the Fed's pledge to keep rates low for two years as one reason for the favorable terms. Plus, jitters over the European debt crisis also contributed to low rates.  
BUSINESS
By Kelley Holland and Kelley Holland,American Banker | January 14, 1992
NEW YORK -- Interest rate cuts may well prove to be the right medicine for the ailing economy, but they could also carry some side effects for the nation's banks.Overall, bankers are generally delighted that rates have fallen so dramatically. Their hope, of course, is that loan demand will be stimulated, reinvigorating the economy. Investors, using the same logic, have pushed up bank stocks in recent weeks.The discount rate, after five cuts in the last year, now stands at 3.5 percent, its lowest level since 1964.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
Republicans and Democrats appear to agree on at least one thing: that the United States is facing a STEM (science, technology engineering and math) crisis. In his most recent State of the Union address, President Barack Obama declared that he wants to "reward schools" that focus on STEM classes, for they are "the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. " And as far to the other end of the political spectrum as you can get, Gov. Rick Perry of Texas deemed May 6-12 to be the first ever "Celebration of STEM Education Week in Texas.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 22, 2013
We baby boomers get blamed for just about every economic hiccup, because there are so many of us. And our children are particularly furious because they believe the crisis in Social Security, which may affect their ability to retire, can be laid at our feet like kindling for a burning at the stake. They are convinced we boomers, with our outsized appetites and sense of entitlement, are going to consume everything on our way to the cemetery, right down to the amount of ground we leave for those who die after us. But data from the Social Security Administration itself, provided by chief actuary Stephen Goss, demonstrates that boomers are not the pig-through-the-python that we have been described as being.
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