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NEWS
July 23, 2013
It is no wonder that no affordable housing is being planned at Harbor Point despite the $107 million tax subsidy being sought ("What Harbor Point is asking for," July 21). The affordable housing bill passed by the City Council in 2007 was never intended to be functional. It was doomed to failure from the very start. It merely served as an "opiate for the people," despite the fact that it was brought about by faith communities to deal with the injustices in Baltimore City's housing market for low-income workers.
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NEWS
March 10, 2014
A Baltimore Housing Authority proposal to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements to the properties has got some advocates and tenants worried. Some are calling the plan a "giveaway" to developers eager to convert the units into market-rate rentals, and maintenance workers at the agency have expressed fear for their jobs if the buildings are sold to private owners. But what all those involved in the debate need to recognize is that unless the city tries a new approach, Baltimore's stock of public housing is going to drop anyway because of a lack of money to perform even basic maintenance.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
With a final County Council vote scheduled Monday on rezoning downtown Columbia, advocates for housing affordable to low-wage workers feel their hopes for a last-minute compromise are dead. The Howard County Council briefly discussed their ideas at a nearly five-hour work session Monday night, but it appears ready to adopt a requirement that builders provide at least 15 percent of new units for households with incomes under about $80,000 - too high, the advocates said, to meet the real need.
NEWS
November 28, 2013
I just want to comment on the decision made by Baltimore County Council ("Baltimore County Council rejects low-income housing project," Nov. 18). This council acted in the best interest of the residents of this community for a change. Baltimore County seems to want to saturate the area with such housing when there is already enough. The council did the job they were hired to do - listened to their constituents and did what they wanted. Our community has not been as fortunate.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
The Baltimore County Council is poised to block a low-income housing project planned in Rosedale by turning down state funding, citing fears the development would lead to increased crime and crowd the local elementary school. The move comes a month after another developer dropped plans to build an affordable-housing project in White Marsh that also faced strong community opposition. Housing advocates say resistance to such projects could exacerbate a worrisome shortage of homes for low-income residents in the county.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
The developer of a planned affordable-housing community in Glen Burnie will start construction on the project next month, after the Anne Arundel County Council voted to grant the company a key tax break on the project. The council's 4-3 vote on the tax break for New York-based Conifer Realty allows the 36-unit project to move forward, despite complaints from residents who said the development has the potential to bring more crime to the area and decrease property values. Those assertions were voiced by County Councilman John J. Grasso, who represents the Glen Burnie area and has said it already has an abundant stock of low-income housing.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
Does Harford County need more affordable housing for low-income residents?And if so, how much and where?The Enterprise Foundation -- a non-profit organization created by Harborplace and Columbia developer James W. Rouse to build affordable housing -- hopes to answer those questions.The foundation said Thursday it has agreed to conduct a survey of the county's low-income housing and develop a long-range plan to create new affordable housing in Harford.Enterprise was asked to do the study by the Ecumenical Community of Harford County Inc., which operates a transitional shelter for homeless women and children in Street.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Baltimore's Housing Authority filed a motion Friday to prevent its property from being sold in order to satisfy a $2.6 million judgment in a lead paint exposure case, according to the agency. Last week, representatives from the Baltimore's sheriff's office tagged vehicles used by the Housing Authority in anticipation of seizing them to pay off a jury award. Siblings Antonio Fulgham and Brittany McCutcheon were provided the judgment in 2010, but the agency has resisted making payments while it appeals.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
After hearing from scores of citizens opposed to the deal, a Baltimore City Council committee approved a plan Wednesday night to give millions in taxpayer assistance to the $1.8 billion Harbor Point development. The 3-0 vote came over the objections of protesters who demonstrated outside City Hall. A disgusted Councilman Carl Stokes, the committee chairman who has fought the subsidies, left the room as the vote was being called. Councilmen Warren Branch, William H. Cole IV and Edward Reisinger voted in the favor of the plan.
NEWS
November 24, 2013
Allison Knezevich's piece ( "Baltimore County Council poised to block low-income housing," Nov. 18) does a great job of showcasing the many misconceptions about low-income housing and the people who need its assistance. The views expressed by supporters of the resolution blocking the Rosedale housing project are typical NIMBYism, where communities are under the impression that the presence of participants in low-income housing programs leads to increased crime and overcrowding of schools.
NEWS
November 24, 2013
Allison Knezevich's piece ( "Baltimore County Council poised to block low-income housing," Nov. 18) does a great job of showcasing the many misconceptions about low-income housing and the people who need its assistance. The views expressed by supporters of the resolution blocking the Rosedale housing project are typical NIMBYism, where communities are under the impression that the presence of participants in low-income housing programs leads to increased crime and overcrowding of schools.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
There is clearly an immediate need for housing among homeless families in Baltimore County. However, while the construction of low-income housing developments may temporarily alleviate the problem, over the long run it will only produce larger areas of concentrated poverty that ensure the majority of these families remain trapped in poverty for generations to come ( "Just saying no isn't good enough," Nov. 20). One has only to look at what happened in Baltimore City over the last 50 years, when large tracts of high-rise buildings designed exclusively for low-income housing were developed.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
The Baltimore County Council is poised to block a low-income housing project planned in Rosedale by turning down state funding, citing fears the development would lead to increased crime and crowd the local elementary school. The move comes a month after another developer dropped plans to build an affordable-housing project in White Marsh that also faced strong community opposition. Housing advocates say resistance to such projects could exacerbate a worrisome shortage of homes for low-income residents in the county.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
Why are long-time Columbia residents outraged by the county's plan to buy the Verona Apartments and increase the amount of low-income housing surrounding the Oakland Mills Village Center? I can explain it: 60 percent. That's how many children at Stevens Forest Elementary School currently receive free or reduced-price lunches. The average for the entire county is only 20 percent. Next door in Talbot Springs, 47 percent of the children receive free or reduced-price lunches and 22 percent have limited English proficiency.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
After hearing from scores of citizens opposed to the deal, a Baltimore City Council committee approved a plan Wednesday night to give millions in taxpayer assistance to the $1.8 billion Harbor Point development. The 3-0 vote came over the objections of protesters who demonstrated outside City Hall. A disgusted Councilman Carl Stokes, the committee chairman who has fought the subsidies, left the room as the vote was being called. Councilmen Warren Branch, William H. Cole IV and Edward Reisinger voted in the favor of the plan.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
It is no wonder that no affordable housing is being planned at Harbor Point despite the $107 million tax subsidy being sought ("What Harbor Point is asking for," July 21). The affordable housing bill passed by the City Council in 2007 was never intended to be functional. It was doomed to failure from the very start. It merely served as an "opiate for the people," despite the fact that it was brought about by faith communities to deal with the injustices in Baltimore City's housing market for low-income workers.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
There is clearly an immediate need for housing among homeless families in Baltimore County. However, while the construction of low-income housing developments may temporarily alleviate the problem, over the long run it will only produce larger areas of concentrated poverty that ensure the majority of these families remain trapped in poverty for generations to come ( "Just saying no isn't good enough," Nov. 20). One has only to look at what happened in Baltimore City over the last 50 years, when large tracts of high-rise buildings designed exclusively for low-income housing were developed.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | February 17, 2006
A coalition of three Howard County groups is trying to revive public discussion of a once touchy but now rarely mentioned topic -- low-income housing. "There is this lower [income] category we don't talk about," said Sherman Howell, who this week raised the issue to three Howard County council members -- two of whom are running for county executive this year. With home prices in Howard up more than 77 percent in four years, public discussion has shifted from low-income housing to units for people in the $34,000 to $90,000 income range.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
I was dismayed to read of Councilwoman Rikki Spector's new bill to address aggressive panhandling ("Spector bill targets 'aggressive' begging," Jan. 29). Baltimore already has statutes restricting aggressive panhandling. People are prohibited from begging on public transportation, within 10 feet of an ATM, in traffic, and in a threatening and aggressive manner. We should be exploring what we can do to help these poor folks, not creating more obstacles and court expenses. Baltimore has been down this road before.
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