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By Newsday | May 4, 1993
Nine sites in New York have been chosen for a study of whether a low-fat diet will help prevent breast cancer from recurring.The American Cancer Society, which is organizing the study, is hoping to get about 2,000 postmenopausal women from around the state who have been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer, said Dr. Daniel Nixon, the society's vice president for cancer detection and treatment and the project's author.For five years, half of the women would eat a diet in which fat provides only 15 percent of their daily calories.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
A new study provides the best evidence to date that a Mediterranean diet high in olive oil, fish, vegetables and nuts can reduce heart disease. The research, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine online edition, found that the diet can reduce heart attacks and strokes by 30 percent. Other scientists have had similar findings, but this study conducted in Spain is the first major clinical trial. Previous research mostly showed that people living in Mediterranean countries had low risk of heart disease.
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NEWS
By Lawrence K. Altman and Lawrence K. Altman,New York Times News Service | November 20, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- A major new study of a cholesterol-lowering drug has found that it can shrink the fatty deposits in coronary arteries that are linked to heart attacks.The findings, in a study of the drug lovastatin, hold the promise that significant progress can ultimately be made in reducing the toll from heart disease, the leading killer in the United States and most developed countries.The results of the study add to the evidence that a low-fat diet and drugs can halt and reverse the buildup of fatty deposits, or plaque, in arteries in a process known as atherosclerosis, but it is the first suggestion that a single drug could have that effect.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 12, 2006
Because I am on a restricted diet, can you provide me with a low-fat recipe for a pastry crust? You're not alone in your quest for a low-fat crust, but a good one is hard to find. "There is no successful low-fat recipe," said Barbara Farner, extension educator in nutrition and wellness at the University of Illinois Extension. "Crisp roll-out cookies and piecrusts are two dishes without successful low-fat alternatives." Farner offered these suggestions for those on restricted diets: Select an oil-based piecrust recipe that uses the more healthful canola or olive oil. Such recipes would contain the same amount of fat, but they would contain less saturated fat. Switch to a graham-cracker crust, which requires less fat than that found in a traditional pastry crust.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG and THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2006
Overturning three decades of conventional wisdom, a 13-year study of low-fat diets in nearly 50,000 healthy older women has shown that reducing fat intake alone does not significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, breast cancer or colorectal cancer, researchers reported yesterday. Results from the same study, reported last month, also showed that reducing fats without reducing calories does not lead to significant weight loss. "Just switching to low-fat foods is not likely to yield much health benefit in most women," said Marcia Stefanick, a professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center.
FEATURES
By Sandra Jacobs and Sandra Jacobs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1998
There's more to life than a low-fat diet, most of us agree. But who was expecting to hear that from Dean Ornish, the physician-apostle of near no-fat eating?Lately Ornish is everywhere: kindly lecturing via PBS airways, promoting another would-be best seller, smiling at us from the cover of Newsweek, even introducing a new line of frozen foods. With each appearance, the doctor is touting his new message.People interested in heart disease -- either because it's their business or because their lives are at stake -- know Ornish as the dean of the low-fat diet.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer | September 21, 1993
A low-fat diet is the most effective way to lower your cholesterol and to lose weight and keep it off. Three recent studies in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics (June 1993) tell us why.A low-fat diet helps you lose weight primarily by forcing you to eat a diet high in fiber. The single stimulus that signals you to stop eating during a meal is when your brain sends you a message that you have had enough calories. Fiber provides no calories, but its bulk deceives your brain into thinking you are getting them.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | June 18, 1991
MIKE CRONIN, husband, father of two and a Social Securit Administration analyst, whipped out his shopping list and started to scour the supermarket for fruits, various veggies, chicken and fish."
FEATURES
September 16, 1990
I've been meaner lately, shouting at the kids, snapping at my wife, being more aggressive toward other drivers -- especially those jerks who play what's-my-lane.I think I know why I've been so hostile. It is the olive oil. Every morning, in a bow to the cholesterol police, instead of slathering my toast with butter I dip it in olive oil. According to the authorities olive oil is less of an artery-clogger than butter. According to me, it tastes good on toast.Recent studies, however, have indicated that lowering your cholesterol may make you meaner.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
A new study provides the best evidence to date that a Mediterranean diet high in olive oil, fish, vegetables and nuts can reduce heart disease. The research, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine online edition, found that the diet can reduce heart attacks and strokes by 30 percent. Other scientists have had similar findings, but this study conducted in Spain is the first major clinical trial. Previous research mostly showed that people living in Mediterranean countries had low risk of heart disease.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 14, 2006
News arrived last week that a low-fat diet does not reduce a woman's risk of getting cancer or heart disease, and my girlfriends and I feel bitterly betrayed. A federal study that cost $415 million and included 50,000 women found no health benefits for those who spent eight years on a low-fat diet. (Apparently, the women didn't lose any weight either. I could have told the scientists that for $1.98.) The way my friends and I figure it, the medical community owes us an apology and a huge pizza party.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DAN THANH DANG and JONATHAN BOR, FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTERS | February 9, 2006
Confused by this week's news that a low-fat diet might not help prevent cancer and heart disease after all? Beth Hobson was. "I've been on a low-fat diet for four years now," said the 44-year-old part-time worker at a fitness center in Pasadena. "Does that mean I can go back to eating full saturated fats? I should go home and eat a pizza tonight?" By no means, scientists said yesterday. The real culprits in our diets, they say, are the hardened fats in margarine and shortening, as well as saturated fats in meat.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG and THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2006
Overturning three decades of conventional wisdom, a 13-year study of low-fat diets in nearly 50,000 healthy older women has shown that reducing fat intake alone does not significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, breast cancer or colorectal cancer, researchers reported yesterday. Results from the same study, reported last month, also showed that reducing fats without reducing calories does not lead to significant weight loss. "Just switching to low-fat foods is not likely to yield much health benefit in most women," said Marcia Stefanick, a professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 2004
Obesity rates are rising, but science has barely weighed in on the best way for people to shed fat. That state of affairs is starting to change, and doctors are getting a surprise or two. Last month, the popular carb-slashing Atkins diet received a dollop of endorsement from two studies after years of being pooh-poohed by health specialists. The studies, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, showed that the meat- and fat-rich regimen caused faster weight loss in the short term than a conventional low-fat diet.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN FOOD EDITOR | March 29, 2000
Dr. Andrew Weil believes in the pleasure principle -- especially when it comes to healthy food. Weil, a medical doctor and author of several popular "eating well" books, contends you have to enjoy eating the food that's good for you. Otherwise, you won't eat it for long, if ever. "How one eats affects everything," says Weil, who was in Baltimore recently to promote his newest book, "Eating Well for Optimum Health" (Knopf). "There is more confusion about food and diet than at any time [before now]
FEATURES
By Sandra Jacobs and Sandra Jacobs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1998
There's more to life than a low-fat diet, most of us agree. But who was expecting to hear that from Dean Ornish, the physician-apostle of near no-fat eating?Lately Ornish is everywhere: kindly lecturing via PBS airways, promoting another would-be best seller, smiling at us from the cover of Newsweek, even introducing a new line of frozen foods. With each appearance, the doctor is touting his new message.People interested in heart disease -- either because it's their business or because their lives are at stake -- know Ornish as the dean of the low-fat diet.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | May 4, 1993
If you're eating extra corn, fish and olive oil because you think they prevent heart attacks, you're taking in a lot of extra calories for the wrong reason. There is no scientific evidence that taking extra fat in any form prevents heart disease. The key to helping to prevent heart disease is to reduce intake of saturated fat.No oil contains only one type of fat.Corn oil is known primarily for its unsaturated fat content because it contains about 57 percent unsaturated fat, but it also contains about 29 percent monounsaturated fat and about 14 percent saturated fat.Butter is known as a rich source of saturated fat content because it contains about 60 percent saturated fat, but it also contains about 37 percent monounsaturated fat and about 3 percent unsaturated fat.Olive oil is known for its monounsaturated fat content because it contains about 51 percent monounsaturated fat, but it also contains about 28 percent saturated fat and about 21 percent unsaturated fat.Butter is loaded with saturated fat, which raises blood cholesterol more than any other component in your diet.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DAN THANH DANG and JONATHAN BOR, FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTERS | February 9, 2006
Confused by this week's news that a low-fat diet might not help prevent cancer and heart disease after all? Beth Hobson was. "I've been on a low-fat diet for four years now," said the 44-year-old part-time worker at a fitness center in Pasadena. "Does that mean I can go back to eating full saturated fats? I should go home and eat a pizza tonight?" By no means, scientists said yesterday. The real culprits in our diets, they say, are the hardened fats in margarine and shortening, as well as saturated fats in meat.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1997
Jack Sprat could eat low fat,His wife could eat no lean.And so betwixt them both, you see,He outlived her by a long shot.The point of their rewriting the nursery rhyme, according to Francine Grabowski and Linda Levy, is that the low-fat life is desirable, obtainable and even delicious. Even if your family demands that "dinner" be such dishes as fried chicken and mashed potatoes, you can cook -- and persuade them to eat -- in a more healthful way.To prove it, Grabowski, a registered dietitian from Pennsylvania, and Levy, a humor writer from New Jersey, teamed up on "Low-Fat Living for Real People" (Lake Isle Press, 1997, $12.95)
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 1995
For years, obstetricians have been telling patients how much weight to gain -- as if they knew the answer. They don't, says Dr. David A. Nagey, director of maternal-fetal medicine at the University of Maryland Hospital."
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