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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 6, 1992
Q: All the publicity about the risks of a high cholesterol count for heart disease have made me very happy that my careful dietary habits have always kept my cholesterol close to 150. Now I have read there may be some danger from having a cholesterol level that is too low. Would it be a good idea for me to follow a less rigid diet so my cholesterol would be higher?A: No! Newspaper headlines recently trumpeted some findings from the MRFIT study which reported a cholesterol level below 160 mg/dl was associated with a higher death rate from several causes.
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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | January 17, 2008
My face looked like a dry, glazed doughnut for eight years, until I read your column about using milk of magnesia on the face and scalp. My dermatologist had been treating my scalp, but I got nowhere. Both problems disappeared after one application of MoM. Milk of magnesia (magnesium hydroxide aka MoM) has been used for more than a century as an oral laxative. More recently, we have heard from readers that if this chalky liquid is applied to underarms, it acts as a deodorant. Someone else told us that topical applications of milk of magnesia on the face while showering could be effective for flakes.
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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 15, 2005
I heard that there was a study about possible bad effects of low cholesterol in children. I am concerned about this because my teenagers have cholesterol levels of 103 and 110. What were the problems? I would like to know where this was published so I can share it with their pediatrician. For years, there have been puzzling reports that low cholesterol levels may be associated with impulsive and violent behavior in adults. Animal studies (in dogs and monkeys) have also found a link between low cholesterol and aggressive behavior.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | October 4, 2007
There seems to be conflicting information on the relationship between consuming shellfish and cholesterol. What does the latest research show? If shellfish is a high-cholesterol food, how much is too much? For years, dietitians counseled people to avoid foods high in cholesterol. The theory was that eating cholesterol would raise cholesterol in the blood. As a result, many avoided eggs and shellfish, even though there was little, if any, data to suggest that such foods posed a problem.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | November 23, 2006
In a season of ritual overeating, Johns Hopkins researchers have come up with another reason for men to watch their diets: Low cholesterol might protect them from the most aggressive form of prostate cancer. This isn't the first time medical researchers have linked fats to cancer and its consequences. Recent studies have linked obesity to higher death rates from several types of cancer, and a previous Hopkins study found that men on cholesterol-lowering drugs were less likely to develop fast-growing prostate tumors.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | February 16, 1993
A high school football coach can watch students as they walk down the school's corridors and tell which children have the ability to run fast. Those with flat feet, bowed legs and pigeon toes have a built-in advantage.When you run, you land on the outside bottom part of your foot and naturally roll inward. The vast majority of people who are told they have flat feet really have normal arches. But they usually roll inward far more than normal. Their feet only appear to be flat because their arches roll inward so far you can't see their soles touching the ground.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 12, 1992
There's nothing wrong with Odells night club, just with the people who go there.We will use force to deliver food in Bosnia but the aggressors can stay there, we are not going to harm them.It turns out low cholesterol people die as young as high cholesterol people, only from different causes, so you have been denying yourself steak for nothing.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
For years, doctors have turned the conventional wisdom about the dangers of high cholesterol on its head when it comes to the many thousands of people on dialysis. Despite the general acknowledgement that high cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease and strokes, data have suggested that dialysis patients with high cholesterol have lower death rates than others with supposedly "healthy" blood-lipid levels -- prompting many physicians to refrain from treating dialysis patients with drugs such as statins that can bring cholesterol down.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 7, 2003
My father takes Niaspan and Lipitor, which have lowered his cholesterol to 110. Isn't that too low? He has severe arthritis, memory problems and debilitating fatigue. I worry that he is taking too much medicine, but he says the doctor knows best and refuses to question him. The issue of whether cholesterol can be too low is controversial. There is evidence, however, that low cholesterol levels might increase a person's risk of stroke caused by bleeding within the brain. Researchers have also found that depression is more common in people with very low cholesterol.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
For those who love a fistful of french fries, loads of extra cheese and hamburgers with the works, the news seemed a gift from the gods.Some Baltimore diners welcomed reports yesterday of recent studies that say very low cholesterol levels may be as deadly as very high levels. A few health-conscious eaters, perhaps used to bragging about their low levels, reacted with mild disbelief."It's one less thing to worry about," said Vickie Bonovich of Owings Mills, 33, a systems analyst with a downtown brokerage firm.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | November 24, 2006
I am a 54-year-old woman with low cholesterol and no risk factors for heart disease. I had a heart attack from an artery spasm two weeks ago after my second dose of Boniva. The doctors were floored. They were unable to find any damage or plaque in my arteries in the angiogram. I noticed an article you wrote about a woman who also suffered a heart attack while taking Boniva. Is there any connection between this drug and heart attacks? We forwarded your report to the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | November 23, 2006
In a season of ritual overeating, Johns Hopkins researchers have come up with another reason for men to watch their diets: Low cholesterol might protect them from the most aggressive form of prostate cancer. This isn't the first time medical researchers have linked fats to cancer and its consequences. Recent studies have linked obesity to higher death rates from several types of cancer, and a previous Hopkins study found that men on cholesterol-lowering drugs were less likely to develop fast-growing prostate tumors.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 15, 2005
I heard that there was a study about possible bad effects of low cholesterol in children. I am concerned about this because my teenagers have cholesterol levels of 103 and 110. What were the problems? I would like to know where this was published so I can share it with their pediatrician. For years, there have been puzzling reports that low cholesterol levels may be associated with impulsive and violent behavior in adults. Animal studies (in dogs and monkeys) have also found a link between low cholesterol and aggressive behavior.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 6, 2005
I took Lipitor for about eight months. One morning, I awoke to pain in my neck, upper back, shoulders and arms. In addition, my arms are much weaker than before. The pain has been diagnosed as peripheral neuropathy. The only time I feel good is when I lie in a tub of hot water. Most of my life, I had a great memory, but I've become very forgetful. I start a sentence and then forget what I want to say. I also feel depressed, just the opposite of my usual demeanor. I cannot tolerate these side effects and would like some other way to lower my cholesterol.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 13, 2004
In recent years, doctors have been repeating like a mantra that lower is better when it comes to the bad form of cholesterol, and yesterday they officially recommended the lowest possible levels for people most likely to have a heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest. The new recommendations for those at high risk call for dropping the bad form of cholesterol - LDL - to 70 milligrams per deciliter of blood or lower, down from the prior recommendation of 100. The guidelines also call for more aggressive use of statins, such as Lipitor, capable of preventing formation of plaque in the arteries by inhibiting formation of LDL by the liver.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 7, 2004
You recently told readers not to put Vicks VapoRub in the nose. You suggested that camphor, an ingredient in Vicks, might be the problem. As a pulmonary physician, I can explain the real reason there is a warning against putting Vicks VapoRub in the nostrils. It is not the camphor, but the petrolatum. Petroleum jelly or mineral oil can cause a chronic form of pneumonia when aspirated into the lungs. Most people inhale minute quantities of their nasal secretions, especially during sleep.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 16, 2001
Q. Years ago my father heard that large doses of B vitamins (I don't remember which ones) would repel mosquitoes. Apparently it changed the smell of his skin, because my mother commented that he smelled so bad that she wouldn't bite him, either! A. Taking large doses of vitamin B-1 (thiamin) has long been recommended as a way to repel mosquitoes. The scientific evidence to support this practice is sparse. We heard from one European-trained physician, however, who learned this approach in medical school.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing WriterUnited Feature Syndicate | April 6, 1993
To help you determine how many calories you use during various activities, scientists recommend a common measure called a MET, the amount of energy you use when you sleep. It comes out to around one kilocalorie per kilogram of body weight or about half a calorie per pound. For example, a 130-pound person burns 60 calories per hour during sleep. A 155-pounder uses 70 calories per hour.When you ride a bicycle at 12mph, you are exercising at 10 METS -- or 10 times the amount of energy that you use during sleep.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
For years, doctors have turned the conventional wisdom about the dangers of high cholesterol on its head when it comes to the many thousands of people on dialysis. Despite the general acknowledgement that high cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease and strokes, data have suggested that dialysis patients with high cholesterol have lower death rates than others with supposedly "healthy" blood-lipid levels -- prompting many physicians to refrain from treating dialysis patients with drugs such as statins that can bring cholesterol down.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 7, 2003
My father takes Niaspan and Lipitor, which have lowered his cholesterol to 110. Isn't that too low? He has severe arthritis, memory problems and debilitating fatigue. I worry that he is taking too much medicine, but he says the doctor knows best and refuses to question him. The issue of whether cholesterol can be too low is controversial. There is evidence, however, that low cholesterol levels might increase a person's risk of stroke caused by bleeding within the brain. Researchers have also found that depression is more common in people with very low cholesterol.
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