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NEWS
By Michael Alvear | February 14, 2001
ATLANTA -- It's Valentine's Day, the annual rite of cringing for the single and dateless. This year none of my single girlfriends will get asked February's famous question, "Wilt thou be mine?" There will be no asking, but there will be a lot of wilting. Nothing can make you feel more like Love's orphan than that winged, pudgy brat with the bow and arrow. Some of my friends get around the annual cringefest by sending cards to friends and family, but I don't. I refuse to participate in the dumbing down of Love.
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FEATURES
By Barbara M. Joosse | October 18, 1998
Mama, do you love me?Yes I do, Dear One.How much?I love you more than the raven loves his treasure, more than the dog loves his tail, more than the whale loves his spout.How long?I'll love you until the umiak flies into the darkness, till the stars turn to fish in the sky, and the puffin howls at the moon.Mama,what if I carried our eggs - our ptarmigan eggs! - and tried to be careful, and I tried to walk slowly, but I fell and the eggs broke?Then I would be sorry. But still, I would love you.What if I put salmon in your parka, ermine in your mittens, and lemmings in your mukluks?
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 3, 1995
Con amore. With love, the Italians say. Performances that are delivered truly con amore are incredibly uplifting and, alas, all too rare.The concert at Maryland Hall last Saturday featuring the extraordinary Ethel Ennis, Maryland's first lady of song, J. Ernest Green's Annapolis Chorale and pianist Stef Scaggiari was one of those uplifting occasions.Everything about the concert -- the singing, the playing, the musical arrangements, the audience response -- was full of love.Each note that comes out of Ethel Ennis is sensitive and joyous, its tonal luster intact.
SPORTS
April 24, 1992
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- The undeclared duel between Davis Love III and Fred Couples played second lead yesterday to the cast of players fighting for first place in the Kmart Greater Greensboro Open.Grabbing shares of the spotlight with 5-under-par 67s were Phil Blackmar, Brian Claar, Jeff Maggert, Robert Gamez, Kenny Perry and Bill Britton. Love and Couples have won two tournaments each this year, quite an accomplishment compared with the six leaders' six career tournament wins.Love, winner last week of the Heritage Golf Classic, struggled to an 71, due in part to consecutive bogeys on the back nine.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1999
GINNY MATTHIAS of Glenelg loves her work. It combines her hobby -- gardening -- with her former profession, counseling. But most important, what she does makes a difference in the lives of other people. Matthias works in horticultural therapy which, as she explains it, means "using plants in a therapeutic way." She runs gardening programs for senior citizens at St. Ann Adult Services and St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, both in Catonsville, as well as several retirement communities.
NEWS
July 12, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Richard D. Love Jr., a retired district sales manager for the Monumental Life Insurance Co., will be offered at 9 a.m. today at the Roman Catholic Church of the Resurrection, Paulskirk Drive and Chatham Road, Ellicott City.Mr. Love, who was 66, died Monday at his home in Lakeland, Fla., after an illness of several months.He retired over a year ago after 40 years with the insurance company.Born in Baltimore and a graduate of Loyola High School and the University of Maryland, he served in the Navy in the Pacific during World War II. He was a member of Lions Clubs International.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
Love, by Toni Morrison. Knopf. 208 pages. $23.95. The Cosey women are like sea glass, hardened by their emotional shipwrecks and fused in their storm-tossed, mutual infatuation with one charismatic man. Thus is their fate sealed in Love, Toni Morrison's new novel, set in the faded glory of an ocean-side resort for the black upper-class, a remnant of segregated America. A list of the main characters would suggest formula romance: There's the patriarch, so revered in the community that his amorality is tolerated; his kleptomaniac daughter-in-law; his insecure bride and his granddaughter, best friends who become bitter rivals; a con artist and her teen lover; a mistress whose presence haunts the beach.
FEATURES
By Ken Parish Perkins and Ken Parish Perkins,Dallas Morning News | February 13, 1992
Garrison Keillor, writer, master storyteller and radio star, has been all over the place lately. His book, "WLT: A Radio Romance," remains a strong seller in bookstores. Each Saturday, he writes, produces and hosts "American Radio Company," aired on 235 public radio stations.Now he's even on the tube. In fact, "Garrison Keillor's Hello Love" is the second of three specials for PBS. The first aired in November; the third is set for April.Garrison Keillor, television star?Loyal Keillor fans nervous about Keillor leaving his radio days need not worry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2005
The Sea of Tears By Nani Power. Counterpoint. 238 pages. $25. Love: There, surely, is a cause we can all get behind. Nani Power's new novel, The Sea of Tears, is very pro-love. When she declares in the prologue, "all the great tales are about love. ... At the root of all evil is a heart denied love," Power's wide-eyed optimism about the human heart seems like it could be just the thing -- a refreshing antidote to the steady cultural diet we're fed of dysfunctional couples and terrible marriages.
NEWS
By Ruth Sherman | January 28, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- As soon as tinsel and elf tracks were carted away, hearts of all denominations, designs and dimensions exploded from store windows.While I was still throwing out soggy bows and crushed wrapping paper, a force was loosed on the land. It shouted, "Wake up, you dunderhead -- it's Valentine's Day!"In January? Where did I get the foolish notion that Valentine's Day was Feb. 14? I also used to believe that this was a holiday that had a lot to do with telling the person you love that you truly, dearly do love them.
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