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NEWS
November 21, 2011
Ron Smith's farewell column left me in tears ("My work here is done," Nov. 18). Quite a shock. While we all mourn for those who contract cancer, and we are saddened by the passing of singers, actors and authors whose talents have entertained us, there's something different about a columnist who comments on the condition of society so close to home. Something more personal, because his world is similar to ours. His words more pertinent. Mr. Smith's column was something those of us who share his views eagerly awaited.
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FEATURES
By Barbara M. Joosse | October 18, 1998
Mama, do you love me?Yes I do, Dear One.How much?I love you more than the raven loves his treasure, more than the dog loves his tail, more than the whale loves his spout.How long?I'll love you until the umiak flies into the darkness, till the stars turn to fish in the sky, and the puffin howls at the moon.Mama,what if I carried our eggs - our ptarmigan eggs! - and tried to be careful, and I tried to walk slowly, but I fell and the eggs broke?Then I would be sorry. But still, I would love you.What if I put salmon in your parka, ermine in your mittens, and lemmings in your mukluks?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Liz Hogan once quit swimming because it had consumed her life. A former prodigy from Northern California who first competed for a spot on the 1972 U.S. Olympic team at 15, Hogan retired before she turned 20. She had just finished her freshman year at UCLA after narrowly missing a spot on the 1976 Olympic team as well. The sudden death of her older brother Ted from a previously undetected heart condition known as cardiomyopathy and her own bout with diverticulitis contributed to Hogan's losing her zeal for a sport she had competed in since age 6. But the years of spending hours underwater also had taken their toll emotionally and physically.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Professor Donald S. Sutherland was on his way to meet a big potential donor, or so he thought, so the esteemed Peabody Conservatory faculty member figured he'd better not be late. Hurrying into the school's cafeteria, he scanned the place for his guest and, failing to spot him, decided to grab a tray and get in line. Then the assault began. Four red-clad minstrels stepped from the shadows, two of them strumming guitars. "This Valentone is for you," one declared in his dreamiest crooner's voice.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 3, 1995
Con amore. With love, the Italians say. Performances that are delivered truly con amore are incredibly uplifting and, alas, all too rare.The concert at Maryland Hall last Saturday featuring the extraordinary Ethel Ennis, Maryland's first lady of song, J. Ernest Green's Annapolis Chorale and pianist Stef Scaggiari was one of those uplifting occasions.Everything about the concert -- the singing, the playing, the musical arrangements, the audience response -- was full of love.Each note that comes out of Ethel Ennis is sensitive and joyous, its tonal luster intact.
SPORTS
April 24, 1992
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- The undeclared duel between Davis Love III and Fred Couples played second lead yesterday to the cast of players fighting for first place in the Kmart Greater Greensboro Open.Grabbing shares of the spotlight with 5-under-par 67s were Phil Blackmar, Brian Claar, Jeff Maggert, Robert Gamez, Kenny Perry and Bill Britton. Love and Couples have won two tournaments each this year, quite an accomplishment compared with the six leaders' six career tournament wins.Love, winner last week of the Heritage Golf Classic, struggled to an 71, due in part to consecutive bogeys on the back nine.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1999
GINNY MATTHIAS of Glenelg loves her work. It combines her hobby -- gardening -- with her former profession, counseling. But most important, what she does makes a difference in the lives of other people. Matthias works in horticultural therapy which, as she explains it, means "using plants in a therapeutic way." She runs gardening programs for senior citizens at St. Ann Adult Services and St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, both in Catonsville, as well as several retirement communities.
NEWS
July 12, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Richard D. Love Jr., a retired district sales manager for the Monumental Life Insurance Co., will be offered at 9 a.m. today at the Roman Catholic Church of the Resurrection, Paulskirk Drive and Chatham Road, Ellicott City.Mr. Love, who was 66, died Monday at his home in Lakeland, Fla., after an illness of several months.He retired over a year ago after 40 years with the insurance company.Born in Baltimore and a graduate of Loyola High School and the University of Maryland, he served in the Navy in the Pacific during World War II. He was a member of Lions Clubs International.
FEATURES
By Ken Parish Perkins and Ken Parish Perkins,Dallas Morning News | February 13, 1992
Garrison Keillor, writer, master storyteller and radio star, has been all over the place lately. His book, "WLT: A Radio Romance," remains a strong seller in bookstores. Each Saturday, he writes, produces and hosts "American Radio Company," aired on 235 public radio stations.Now he's even on the tube. In fact, "Garrison Keillor's Hello Love" is the second of three specials for PBS. The first aired in November; the third is set for April.Garrison Keillor, television star?Loyal Keillor fans nervous about Keillor leaving his radio days need not worry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2005
The Sea of Tears By Nani Power. Counterpoint. 238 pages. $25. Love: There, surely, is a cause we can all get behind. Nani Power's new novel, The Sea of Tears, is very pro-love. When she declares in the prologue, "all the great tales are about love. ... At the root of all evil is a heart denied love," Power's wide-eyed optimism about the human heart seems like it could be just the thing -- a refreshing antidote to the steady cultural diet we're fed of dysfunctional couples and terrible marriages.
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