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Love Songs

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NEWS
December 20, 2013
The Sun recently published the latest iteration of Vincent DeMarco's love songs to Obamacare, and Mr. DeMarco demonstrates once again that he has no sense of obligation to the truth ( "Don't forget the ACA's true purpose," Dec. 16). For example, Mr. DeMarco states that "working families are now guaranteed that health insurance will cover doctors' visits and prescriptions and preventive care. " What he doesn't say, however, is that many of the tens of thousands of Maryland policies that are being canceled by Obamacare already cover doctors' visits, prescriptions and preventive care.
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NEWS
December 20, 2013
The Sun recently published the latest iteration of Vincent DeMarco's love songs to Obamacare, and Mr. DeMarco demonstrates once again that he has no sense of obligation to the truth ( "Don't forget the ACA's true purpose," Dec. 16). For example, Mr. DeMarco states that "working families are now guaranteed that health insurance will cover doctors' visits and prescriptions and preventive care. " What he doesn't say, however, is that many of the tens of thousands of Maryland policies that are being canceled by Obamacare already cover doctors' visits, prescriptions and preventive care.
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FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1991
Before launching into his cover of "If Only For One Night," Luther Vandross asked a rapt Capital Centre audience last night, "Do you like love songs?"Of course they did, and when he told them that they had come to the right place for them, he won the truth-in-advertising award.Just as you go to Cal Ripken for base hits, you go to Luther Vandross for music to set a romantic mood.That's what Vandross does and that's all that he does and it is both his blessing and his curse, as evidenced in last night's largely uneven 105-minute performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
For the past seven years, Darnella Parks and her entire family - from toddler nieces to her 84-year-old grandmother - have attended Artscape. They come for the crafts, the food and, most of all, the live entertainment. But this year, the 33-year-old Towson resident and her family are skipping Friday's opening night - not because of the heat or the crowds, but because of the music. Brian McKnight, the 16-time Grammy nominee who for years built a reputation as a clean-cut, R&B ladies' man, is scheduled to take Artscape's main stage Friday night.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1994
Talk about the soft and sentimental side of '70s pop music, and it'll only be a matter of minutes before the Captain & Tennille are mentioned.Such Top-40 hits as "Love Will Keep Us Together," "Do That To Me One More Time" and "Muskrat Love" will rise up from your musical subconscious, and the next thing you know you'll be rooting around in the back of your closet for those polyester leisure suits you really should have donated to the Smithsonian.Although the husband-and-wife team known as the Captain & Tennille still perform as such, Toni Tennille has, over the past decade, made a name for herself as a singer of jazz standards.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 12, 1995
What are the greatest love songs? That's almost as hard to answer as the question, "What makes an ideal lover?" How romantic a particular song seems depends in part on the circumstances -- a Paul McCartney ballad that sounds terminally soppy to an unattached listener might seem the epitome of amour to a couple in the first blush of love.With that in mind, what follows is meant less as a definitive list than as a set of suggestions. How you act on them is up to you and your sweetie.Ten Great Love Songs* "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" (Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
Ne-Yo looked backward as he moved forward on his most recent album, Year of the Gentleman. Considering the bleak state of mainstream urban music these days, where lyrical chivalry seems to have gone the way of the eight-track, the R&B-pop star wanted to bring romance back. He wanted to croon openhearted tunes of fidelity and down-on-your-knees songs of vulnerability. He also wanted to look natty while doing it. "There were a couple of statements I wanted to make with this record," says Ne-Yo, who headlines the Lyric Opera House tonight.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 14, 1993
At the risk of sounding like Paul McCartney: You'd think that people really would have had enough of silly love songs. Or even the not-so-silly ones.After all, there are only so many ways of singing "I love you," and Lord knows, songwriters have tried 'em all. For instance, in 1966 Bobby Vinton had a hit with "I Love You the Way You Are." Twelve years later, Billy Joel added a word and had, "(I Love You) Just the Way You Are." Doubtless some tunesmith somewhere is at the moment sweating away on "I Just Love You the Way You Are."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2003
"How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night, like softest music to attending ears," says Romeo in Act II of Shakespeare's ultimate love tragedy. That silver sweetness will reverberate in the lofty space of Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis this weekend when coloratura soprano Kathleen Kinhan, tenor Vincent Tulli Chambers and baritone Joseph Specter visit the church for a program of vocal music, "Love Songs Through the Ages." "Music in general touches people on a visceral level," says Tulli Chambers, who has sung with New York's Dicapo, Amato and Regina opera companies.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 14, 1998
There are few things in love that are as romantic as expressing your emotions in song. Many women find it incredibly flattering to receive a late-night serenade from their beloved. (Though it's not always appropriate to take the guitar-outside-her-bedroom-window approach -- especially if her bedroom is in her fifth-floor apartment.)It doesn't matter if your voice is less than perfect; it's the thought that counts.Just be careful what you sing.Sometimes, what you think is a love song turns out to be something else altogether.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | February 15, 2012
When Hunter Hayes, the 20-year-old sensation just nominated as the Academy of Country Music's Best New Artist, has a day to himself, the first thing he does is find a music store. "I'm obsessed with gear," Hayes said recently on the phone. Look at the liner notes of his 2011 self-titled album and it's clear to see why: Hayes can play everything in the store. On the album, the self-taught Hayes plays 22 instruments, including the clavinet (an electronic keyboard) and the accordion. After opening for Taylor Swift last summer, Hayes hit the road for his own headlining venture, the Most Wanted Tour, which stops by the Recher Theatre for a sold-out show tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson | February 14, 2012
It's Valentine's Day at William McKinley High. Cue the sappy love songs. If you guessed this week's glee club's assignment would be "World's Greatest Love Songs," then you, my friend, are correct. And everyone's not-so-favorite rich girl, Sugar, is throwing a Valentine's Day party at Breadstix...I mean, the Sugar Shack. Single people are not welcome because they're "sad and boring" and don't exist in her world. So everyone has to bring a date. And for some unknown reason, Artie and Rory are vying for Sugar's attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Alex Turner has a writer's eye. The Arctic Monkeys' singer-songwriter pens lyrics full of biting wit and pointed remarks. On "Reckless Serenade," a track from his band's recently released fourth album, he sings of the "type of kisses where teeth collide" before his narrator sadly retreats, singing, "Called up to listen to the voice of reason and got his answering machine. " His perspective, both humorous and earnest, stands out in modern-day rock. So where does the 25-year-old from Sheffield, England, draw inspiration?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
When Sara Bareilles' new album was released, it surprised many by heading straight to the top of the charts. It was a shock not just because it was just Bareilles' second album, coming off 2007's "Little Voice," but also because of the kind of music she makes. At a time when dance-infused hip-hop is dominating the Billboard charts, here was a 13-track album of upbeat, traditional pop nestled at No. 1, with 90,000 units sold, according to Nielsen Soundscan. "There's a lot of stuff out there that's dance and club-oriented," Bareilles said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
Ne-Yo looked backward as he moved forward on his most recent album, Year of the Gentleman. Considering the bleak state of mainstream urban music these days, where lyrical chivalry seems to have gone the way of the eight-track, the R&B-pop star wanted to bring romance back. He wanted to croon openhearted tunes of fidelity and down-on-your-knees songs of vulnerability. He also wanted to look natty while doing it. "There were a couple of statements I wanted to make with this record," says Ne-Yo, who headlines the Lyric Opera House tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | February 12, 2009
The past year has been something of a whirlwind for Sara Bareilles, but last Sunday was especially dizzying. The unassuming pop singer-songwriter was on the red carpet at Los Angeles' Staples Center at the 51st annual Grammy Awards. She was up for two. Her smash, the catchy "Love Song," garnered nods for song of the year and best female pop vocal performance. "I couldn't believe I was there," Bareilles says, still sounding awe-struck. "It was one of the best days of my life. It was such a special experience.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
Posterity hasn't been all that kind to Francesco Landini, the Italian composer whose deftly crafted polyphonic harmonies were all the rage in 14th-century Florence. Barely remembered in the modern era, Landini was also an eloquent librettist, penning his singable odes to love, beauty and desire just decades after the great Florentine poet Dante had wrested these once taboo topics from the closed recesses of the medieval mind. But aesthetic justice has triumphed, for Signor Landini is a forgotten man no longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 20, 1999
Elvis Costello has had a number of minor movie roles recently, landing cameos in everything from "200 Cigarettes" to "Spice World."But he's never been so cast against type as he is in the Julia Roberts-Hugh Grant romantic comedy, "Notting Hill." And the funny thing is, he isn't even onscreen when it happens.Costello, in fact, is only on the soundtrack, singing the Charles Aznavour ballad "She" as Grant adoringly contemplates Roberts. "It's just a straight-out, adoring love song that's supposed to represent this guy's idealization of this Hollywood goddess," Costello explains, over the phone from London.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 19, 2008
Ingrid Michaelson has become an unlikely star. Not long after Old Navy used her precious single "The Way I Am" in a sweater commercial last fall, her album, the charming Girls and Boys, soared near the top of the iTunes pop chart. Her songs have also been featured on Grey's Anatomy and One Tree Hill, and in April, she sang on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. She's accomplished all this, including a cover story in Billboard magazine and a video in frequent rotation on VH1, without a major-label contract or a mighty publicity machine.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 11, 2007
It is one of the most mythic romantic entanglements in rock 'n' roll. At some point in the late 1960s, Eric Clapton fell in love with Pattie Boyd, wife of his close friend George Harrison. Clapton's 1970 masterpiece, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs (recorded with his band at the time, Derek and the Dominos), was an offering and a plea to her; they eventually married in 1979 and divorced in 1988. The saga sits at the center of Clapton: The Autobiography, published this week by Broadway Books.
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