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By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2001
Raise your glasses and toast the crazy redhead. The public's love affair with Lucy Ricardo reaches its 50th anniversary tomorrow and shows no signs of waning. Millions remain absorbed by the candy factory, the grape stomping, the Vitameatavegamin. In that spirit, the cable channel TV Land offers a great tribute this week to Lucille Ball and I Love Lucy: It will replay "The Girls Want to Go to a Nightclub" at 9 p.m. tomorrow, a half-century to the moment that the episode launched the series.
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By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Hello. My name is Tim. And I'm an "I Love Lucy"-holic. Think less of me, if you must. It won't bother me. I have no intention of ever being cured, even if it means lifelong membership in The Friends of the Friendless (a "Lucy" reference, of course). It all started when I was a little boy (sorry, another "Lucy" reference). I discovered the greatest sitcom ever made - please, "Seinfeld" fans, do not even try - and that was that. Thanks to omnipresent reruns on Channel 5 in Washington, I would catch the show after school, after dinner, whenever.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 11, 2007
I LOVE LUCY, THE FINAL SEASONS: 7, 8 & 9 -- Paramount Home Video / $39.95 And you thought you had finally collected all the episodes of I Love Lucy last year, with the release of the show's sixth, and final, season. Well, technically, you had. But I Love Lucy was so popular that Lucy, Ricky and the Mertzes were enticed back the next season (as well as two more seasons after that) for a series of hour-long episodes that would air whenever the CBS schedule allowed. The first Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show (later renamed The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Sixty-three years ago this week - at 9 p.m. Oct. 15, 1951 - TV viewers got their first look at a situation comedy on CBS that, in short order, would become part of the country's cultural DNA. The focal point of the show was the redheaded title character, Lucy Ricardo (even in black and white, you could somehow tell the color of her hair); her Cuban-born husband, Ricky, leader of a dance band at a New York club; and their best friends, Fred and Ethel Mertz, landlords of the brownstone apartment building on the Upper East Side where they all laughed, loved, fought and schemed.
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By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2003
The Vitameatavegamin has always provided a kick, and the backstage story has potency too. There were a lot of real tears behind Lucy Ricardo's "WAAAAAA." CBS' uneven Lucy gives a penetrating look at the redheaded legend. The movie opens in 1960, as Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz perform their I Love Lucy characters for the last time. They soon will divorce after 20 rocky years of marriage. We only hear them, as they talk angrily to an errand boy running between their dressing rooms. This clever approach establishes the film.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
Look back to the '50s for the best stuff tonight. That's when Lucille Ball did one of her funniest turns ever for "I Love Lucy," and when the young Elvis Presley was developing his rockabilly style.* "The X-Files" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Here's a mid-week double feature of the Friday night hit, with a two-part episode co-written by star David Duchovny that served as the cliffhanger to bridge the 1993-1994 seasons. After the death of several doctors, Mulder and Scully (Duchovny and Gillian Anderson)
TRAVEL
By Jill Schensul and By Jill Schensul,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2001
The pizza oven broke down just before the pizza party. The guy with the wine forgot to show up for the wine tasting. And the tour bus got hit by an errant motorcycle. Is this any way to run a Lucy Birthday Celebration? What do you think? If you've ever seen an I Love Lucy episode (and who hasn't?), you know Lucy thrived on disaster. She was at her best in a bad situation. When the candy conveyor belt went a little too fast, the walk-in freezer door closed and locked her in, or she'd had just a little too much Vitameatavegamin, Lucy made us love her. Because Lucy -- be it Lucille Ball or Lucy Ricardo -- had heart.
NEWS
January 31, 2007
BOB CARROLL JR., 87 Television writer Bob Carroll Jr., a pioneering television writer who worked on every one of Lucille Ball's TV shows, including the 1950s classic I Love Lucy, died Saturday in Los Angeles, his longtime friend Thomas Watson said. Mr. Carroll and Madelyn Pugh Davis, his writing partner, were working on comedian Steve Allen's radio show in the 1940s when they learned Ms. Ball was looking for writers for her show, My Favorite Husband. When the show moved to television in 1953, Ms. Ball brought her writers with her, changing the show's name to I Love Lucy and adding real-life husband Desi Arnaz to the cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 25, 2001
I Love Lucy: Celebrating Fifty Years of Love and Laughter, by Elisabeth Edwards (Running Press, 287 pages, $39.95) It was 50 years ago -- to be precise, Oct. 15, 1951 -- that the very first segment of I Love Lucy was broadcast by CBS. Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz proceeded to cast the immortal mold for situation comedies. There's not one on television today that does in one way or another play off that punchy, loving classic -- which in revival reruns is still fresh and, to those who like it, deathlessly enchanting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Ball of Fire: The Tumultuous Life and Comic Art of Lucille Ball, by Stefan Kanfer. Knopf. 384 pages. $25.95. For decades, the list of successful Hollywood comediennes began and ended with Lucille Ball. A one-time Goldwyn Girl (a group of attractive, long-limbed dancers used as cinematic window dressing during the 1930s and '40s by producer Samuel Goldwyn), Ball knocked around various Hollywood studio lots for years, eking out a living and generally serving as the best thing in bad pictures, before finding her niche in the early days of television.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
1. In the episode "Lucy Has Her Eyes Examined?" (it will be re-created in the "I Love Lucy Live on Stage" production at the Hippodrome ), Lucy gets a dance lesson from: a)Van Johnson b)William Parker c)The Crazy Dancin' Bear d)"King Cat" Walsh 2. When Lucy tests Ricky's fidelity in "The Black Wig" episode, she and Ethel disguise themselves for a date with the guys at an Italian restaurant. How does Lucy describe the outfit hastily supplied by costumer "Mother Carol" for Ethel: a)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 11, 2007
I LOVE LUCY, THE FINAL SEASONS: 7, 8 & 9 -- Paramount Home Video / $39.95 And you thought you had finally collected all the episodes of I Love Lucy last year, with the release of the show's sixth, and final, season. Well, technically, you had. But I Love Lucy was so popular that Lucy, Ricky and the Mertzes were enticed back the next season (as well as two more seasons after that) for a series of hour-long episodes that would air whenever the CBS schedule allowed. The first Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show (later renamed The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour)
NEWS
January 31, 2007
BOB CARROLL JR., 87 Television writer Bob Carroll Jr., a pioneering television writer who worked on every one of Lucille Ball's TV shows, including the 1950s classic I Love Lucy, died Saturday in Los Angeles, his longtime friend Thomas Watson said. Mr. Carroll and Madelyn Pugh Davis, his writing partner, were working on comedian Steve Allen's radio show in the 1940s when they learned Ms. Ball was looking for writers for her show, My Favorite Husband. When the show moved to television in 1953, Ms. Ball brought her writers with her, changing the show's name to I Love Lucy and adding real-life husband Desi Arnaz to the cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2006
I Love Lucy: The Complete Sixth Season [Paramount] $30 Those who love Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz will have ample opportunity to express their devotion this week as Paramount releases I Love Lucy: The Complete Sixth Season. Sitcoms have come and gone over the decades, but none has endured quite like I Love Lucy, which premiered on CBS in 1951. The groundbreaking series revolved around ditzy redhead Lucy (Ball), her Cuban-born bandleader husband Ricky Ricardo (Arnaz) and their landlords and best friends, Ethel (Vivian Vance)
NEWS
April 30, 2006
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS FILM COLLECTION / / Warner Home Entertainment / $79.95 No, Tennessee Williams wasn't the author behind every significant movie made between 1950 and 1964. But the Tennessee Williams Film Collection offers a convincing explanation for why one might think that. Few playwrights have enjoyed a string of successes to rival Williams', and throughout the 1950s and into the 1960s, it was rare that a movie adapted from one of his plays wasn't making waves at the box office. His Deep South morality plays, always accompanied by generous helpings of wit, brutality and (usually suppressed)
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | November 23, 2003
A few months ago this column noted that a different caliber of leadership was alive, and mostly still active, in Israel when I first arrived there 30 years ago. David Ben-Gurion, Golda Meir, Moshe Dayan, Abba Eban and other titans in the founding of the modern Jewish state were present. But the man with whom I spent much more time was not a founder of the Jewish state. He would be the first to laugh about his name even being included with those heroes of Zion. His name was Freddie Weisgal.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to the Sun | February 14, 1994
Happy Valentine's Day: more Olympics on CBS, and more nothing on most of the other broadcast networks. Cable, though, has a full slate of offbeat offerings.* "The 1994 Winter Olympic Games" (8-11 p.m., 12:37-1:37 a.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Day 3: Two big things to watch out for today. One is Dan Jansen, taking another shot at trying to win a gold medal in 500-meter speed skating. The other is the final two runs of the men's singles in luge, where you can watch for footage from the infamous inside-the-sled Luge Cam. If the camera breaks, of course, CBS luges the deposit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2006
I Love Lucy: The Complete Sixth Season [Paramount] $30 Those who love Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz will have ample opportunity to express their devotion this week as Paramount releases I Love Lucy: The Complete Sixth Season. Sitcoms have come and gone over the decades, but none has endured quite like I Love Lucy, which premiered on CBS in 1951. The groundbreaking series revolved around ditzy redhead Lucy (Ball), her Cuban-born bandleader husband Ricky Ricardo (Arnaz) and their landlords and best friends, Ethel (Vivian Vance)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Ball of Fire: The Tumultuous Life and Comic Art of Lucille Ball, by Stefan Kanfer. Knopf. 384 pages. $25.95. For decades, the list of successful Hollywood comediennes began and ended with Lucille Ball. A one-time Goldwyn Girl (a group of attractive, long-limbed dancers used as cinematic window dressing during the 1930s and '40s by producer Samuel Goldwyn), Ball knocked around various Hollywood studio lots for years, eking out a living and generally serving as the best thing in bad pictures, before finding her niche in the early days of television.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2003
The Vitameatavegamin has always provided a kick, and the backstage story has potency too. There were a lot of real tears behind Lucy Ricardo's "WAAAAAA." CBS' uneven Lucy gives a penetrating look at the redheaded legend. The movie opens in 1960, as Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz perform their I Love Lucy characters for the last time. They soon will divorce after 20 rocky years of marriage. We only hear them, as they talk angrily to an errand boy running between their dressing rooms. This clever approach establishes the film.
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