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Love Affair

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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 24, 2004
Legendary author Ralph Ellison called it the "blues impulse" - an artist's inclination to revisit the details of painful episodes in hopes of transcending the drama. The end of a love affair - broken promises, nights with no sleep - inspires some of the deepest blues. And Melissa Etheridge knows them all too well. If you stripped away the folk and rock elements of her early records, you'd find the most basic American musical expression, a penetrating feeling - real, jagged and aching. But these days, Etheridge, who will play a four-night stint at D.C.'s 9:30 Club starting tomorrow night, is no longer blue.
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NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
To appreciate just how much tennis means to Shantha Chandra, you need to hear the resident of Columbia's River Hill village tell about the day she delivered her third daughter. First, she played singles. She won the only set she played, 6-1. Then she went to the hospital for the birth of Anita, now a Johns Hopkins University doctoral candidate. "I told my doctor I had a 9:30 match with friends and that I wanted to play it," Chandra said last week, recalling that day in Durham, N.C. "I thought there would be time, and I said that if anything happened, I would be right outside the [Duke University]
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2003
CHICAGO - Somewhere, a child awoke yesterday on a dry pillow in a world of light and love and laughter. Somewhere, an old man smiled, warmed by one more October glow to carry him into the winter and beyond. Somewhere, baseball rewards rather than punishes. Somewhere, just not here. Here, you keep stepping on that same rug no matter how often it's pulled out from under you. Here, you have said "next year" so many times, you might as well save time and say, "next century." Here, bad things happen to good fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff | August 17, 2003
AMHERST, Mass. -- Emily Dickinson scholars call it "the war between the houses." The feud started in the last years of the poet's life with her brother's scandalous love affair, in which the rivals for his affection were the poet's best friend and her poetry's most important champion. It became public with a vengeful lawsuit on which all of late-19th-century Amherst took sides. It drew in Dickinson's literary heirs and editors. It was carried on by the children of the original combatants.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 25, 2003
Stars Juliette Binoche and Jean Reno give Jet Lag everything they've got. Too bad the movie doesn't better reward their effort. As mismatched personalities coincidentally brought together - in this case, at an airport - only to fall in love, Reno and Binoche are trapped in a movie-making cliche. That the film works at all is a testimony to their star power, rather than anything director Daniele Thompson (who wrote the script with son Christopher) brings to the table. Binoche's Rose is an overly enthusiastic beautician - one can tell because of all the makeup she unnecessarily trowels on herself - on her way to Acapulco to escape an abusive relationship.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | May 31, 2003
IN TALKING THIS week about the death of Baltimore's theatrical costume designer, John Lehmeyer, his friends told me that no matter what city he visited, what opera house he worked in, he always returned to his native Baltimore and, of course, to his Bolton Street home. I can see why. The instinct of Baltimoreans to stay close to their roots - or to return to them if cast away by some pressing business - never ceases to amaze me. I can't explain why, but this persistent, cool and soggy spring has given me a few clues.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 31, 2003
LONDON - Maybe autumn's tabloid feeding frenzy about butler sex in the Royal Palace is to blame for the blase reaction to the latest news concerning the Royal Family. Maybe it is that, after revelations that Princess Diana had been wooing a man by wearing only her birthday suit under a fur coat, secret rendezvous of the 1930s seems relatively mild. Whatever the case, Britain has reacted with a collective yawn to new information about the royal crisis of the 1930s, when King Edward VIII abdicated in the name of love, for Wallis Warfield Simpson of Baltimore, who, the news is, had enough love inside her that she also shared it with a used-car salesman, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and By Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2002
A Whistling Woman, by A. S. Byatt. Knopf. 448 pages. $26. As Frederica Potter, a 33-year-old single mother, lies awake at night waiting for her lover, she reflects that "There was always only an unreal moment's grace between the beginning of a love affair ... and this steady self-questioning about how and why and when it would end." The affair, of course, is doomed, its end mostly due to her unwillingness to sacrifice even the smallest part of her hard-won independence. No matter how ardently they are desired, such moments of grace, of love, belief and order amid the chaos of modern life, are rarely sustained, and even then at great cost.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2002
Annapolis artist Nancy Hammond says she gets nervous every year around this time. Tomorrow morning, Hammond plans to open her State Circle gallery doors to people who, if tradition holds, will have been lined up all night for a chance to buy one of her annual Annapolis-themed posters at a bargain. "I am filled with terror every time," said Hammond, 61. "I wonder if they're going to be there." Barring a man-made or natural disaster, a significant number of people are likely to be waiting outside the gallery by the time Hammond's staff starts serving coffee and doughnuts at 5 a.m., well before the gallery's opening.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2001
CLOTILDE BUSCAGLIA may sometimes be forgetful, and she's not as agile as she once was. But when it comes to art, the 89-year-old Crofton woman's passion is as intense as it was when she got her first paint box more than seven decades ago. "Art," she says, "is my whole life." Buscaglia's paint box is on display, along with several of her paintings and drawings, at the Crofton branch of the county public library. Chloe Giampaolo, Buscaglia's daughter, arranged the display in celebration of her mother's 90th birthday next month.
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