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Love Affair

SPORTS
By Mike Bianchi | February 14, 2010
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - It seems only appropriate that this Daytona 500 falls on Valentine's Day. This is, after all, the day when NASCAR hopes its fans will fall back in love with its sport. It is a day NASCAR hopes to write a steamy love letter at 190 mph, vowing to its long, lost fans that it has changed for the better; that the passion and romance is back; that the sport never again will stray and be unfaithful to those who love it most. Roses are red, Violets are blue, Bump-drafting is legal, Bigger restrictor plates, too. Sunday's Great American Race is NASCAR's Great American Opportunity to rekindle a dying love affair.
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FEATURES
By Robert Abele and Robert Abele,LOS ANGELES | August 8, 2008
The complexities that attended writer Christopher Isherwood and artist Don Bachardy's early romance aren't hard to grasp. There was the three-decade age difference, Isherwood being 49 when he met the 18-year-old Bachardy on a Santa Monica, Calif., beach in 1953. Check the imbalance in their accomplishments: Isherwood's authorial celebrity having been established from his Berlin Stories, while Bachardy remained unformed for years and marginalized by Isherwood's famous friends, until he discovered a talent for portraiture.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | July 9, 2008
There's nothing Tabloid America resents like a quiet divorce. We want celebrity breakups public. We want them messy. We want to turn on the TV and see courthouse paparazzi scrums. We want to lean over the checkout counter for tawdry details. Cheating accusations? Yes, please! Good names muddied? If at all possible! Compromising photos? All that you got! So, Kevin Costner, thanks for nothing. Paul McCartney and Heather Mills? That's what we're talking about.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | September 16, 2007
John Flynn was one lucky kid. Not only did his mother never throw away his old comic books, but his aunt actually encouraged his love of Superman, Batman and Spider-Man, those costumed superheroes constantly striving to make the world a better and safer place. "My Aunt Shirley used to give me and my brother comic books after she had read them," he says. Good for Aunt Shirley. Not only did she provide her nephew with the beginnings of a comic-book collection that now numbers in the thousands; she also planted the seeds that would eventually turn young John into an author.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | July 6, 2007
We've all seen the bitingly clever bumper stickers that proclaim, "My child and my money go to X University." As a college professor, when my students gripe about $50,000 annual costs and associated debt, I tell them they don't want to know what I paid a quarter-century ago (60 times less in current dollars). But new research by Public Agenda and the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education indicates that Americans' unease - even bitterness - toward higher education runs deeper than Mercedes-a-year tuition bills.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA PARKER | April 9, 2007
ATLANTA -- Last Tuesday, a man followed a woman into a downtown Atlanta hotel - in the same complex as CNN's headquarters - and shot her in the face and upper body, leaving her fatally wounded. He, in turn, was shot by a security guard and remained hospitalized late last week. The victim, Clara Riddles, worked at the hotel, but the rage that radiated from her assailant, Arthur Mann, was apparently personal. Family members say the two had been dating, but Ms. Riddles had recently broken it off. What propelled the shooting into national headlines was that it happened in the same building occupied by hundreds of CNN staffers, and it was also near a major sports venue where college basketball's Final Four tournament had ended the night before.
NEWS
By Brian Bouldrey and Brian Bouldrey,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 2007
Winterton Blue Trezza Azzopardi Grove / 273 pages / $24 In Winterton Blue, the new novel by Trezza Azzopardi, Lewis is the handsome but high-strung drifter tortured by the premature death, years before, of his twin brother, Wayne. Lewis cannot hold down a job, he cannot maintain much in the way of a normal human relationship, and he cannot bear to be in a room than has much more in it than a bed. "He rests his back against the railing and puts his kitbag on his lap to stop his knees from jumping.
NEWS
By Amy Davis and Amy Davis,Sun Staff | September 17, 2006
Reporter Jill Rosen and I were stationed outside William Donald Schaefer's polling place in Fells Point well before 7 a.m., waiting with TV crews for his arrival when the polls opened. An hour and a half later, there was still no sign of one of Baltimore's most familiar politicians. We knew something was wrong. The obligatory early morning photo ops of candidates casting their vote are one of the few times you can be sure a politician will show up on time. Then we got word that Schaefer was at Iggy's restaurant in Little Italy for breakfast with his long-time friends and political allies.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 16, 2006
In the future, let's hope we can leave the word "trick" out of love stories or sex comedies unless it refers to a prostitute's client. The Lake House, in which a mailbox serves as a time portal for two lovers (Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock) is the latest in a series of gimmick-ridden romances. The increasing absurdity of the trick dashes any genuine emotion as the movie goes on. At the screening I went to, the gentleman in front of me turned around to me and my friends and asked whether we'd noticed that the film ended in a way that made its opening action, even on its own terms, impossible.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
Scott Greatorex cannot wait to sail the Chesapeake Bay in his new 25-foot luxury yacht with gorgeous teak paneling, two cabins, a galley, a flat-screen TV and enough nautical gadgets to man the vessel alone if he so desired. He can already picture overnight stays and strolls with his family along Main Street stores this spring since the Wind Orchid also happens to be docked on an enviable piece of real estate on Spa Creek near the heart of historic Annapolis. To do it on his own, it would cost $180,000 just to buy the same Catalina sailboat, plus thousands more in maintenance, slip fees, insurance and other costs -- making such a luxurious hobby far out of reach for a 49-year-old manager at NASA.
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