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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 16, 1994
SOME DEFENDERS of Bill Clinton say presidents having had adulterous affairs is nothing new. Birds do it. Bees do it. Democrats and even Republicans do it.Clinton is no different from FDR and Ike, they say. Pfui to that, I say.Franklin Roosevelt had an intimate relationship with his wife's social secretary, Lucy Page Mercer, when they were living in Washington during World War I. When Eleanor learned of it she was ready to get a divorce -- and so perhaps was...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
I asked Jennifer M. Kroot to assess the Mike Kuchar films at Artscape. Here's what she said: "Medusa's Gaze" (2010) "It's about Mike's favorite subject: a person dealing with the aftermath of a relationship. A performance artist actually reads poetry in it, but the movie itself is poetical. Mike creates a pretty magical vision, even if the guy is just sitting in his living room, whether with very theatrical, crazy costumes or the fabric of the set. The love affair gone wrong comes out in all these mythological guises, including Medusa's gaze.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and By Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2002
A Whistling Woman, by A. S. Byatt. Knopf. 448 pages. $26. As Frederica Potter, a 33-year-old single mother, lies awake at night waiting for her lover, she reflects that "There was always only an unreal moment's grace between the beginning of a love affair ... and this steady self-questioning about how and why and when it would end." The affair, of course, is doomed, its end mostly due to her unwillingness to sacrifice even the smallest part of her hard-won independence. No matter how ardently they are desired, such moments of grace, of love, belief and order amid the chaos of modern life, are rarely sustained, and even then at great cost.
FEATURES
By Paul R. McHugh and Paul R. McHugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 1998
It's over, nobody wins" is a verse from a Sinatra ballad about a love affair gone sour that one could apply to America's intellectual love affair with Freudian doctrine. What W.H. Auden once described as a "whole climate of opinion" proved, with experience, to be an ideological blunder typical of this century, producing more victims than victories.Oxford's Isaiah Berlin, in a powerful essay on political ideas of the 20th century, saw it all coming in 1949 when he identified a crucial shift from 19th century views about human nature.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 1996
The French are famous romantics. They also have some of the best chocolate in the world. So when Patisserie Poupon makes chocolate candy, it can inspire a love affair -- at least a love affair with chocolates.Frenchman Joseph Poupon and his wife, Ruth, own the Baltimore pastry shop. Ms. Poupon laughs when she remembers the scene at their shop last Valentine's Day. "We had a steady stream of men through here. The ones whose wives frequent our shop all had the same request. They said, 'give me the biggest heart you have,' " she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff | August 17, 2003
AMHERST, Mass. -- Emily Dickinson scholars call it "the war between the houses." The feud started in the last years of the poet's life with her brother's scandalous love affair, in which the rivals for his affection were the poet's best friend and her poetry's most important champion. It became public with a vengeful lawsuit on which all of late-19th-century Amherst took sides. It drew in Dickinson's literary heirs and editors. It was carried on by the children of the original combatants.
NEWS
By Colleen Webster | June 15, 2010
For nearly a year, I have been trying to re-immerse myself into the sport and skill of swimming — more specifically open-water swimming, in which one entrusts the body and mind to a lake or bay of some unknown power and depth. This is more terrifying than that calm sentence implies. Sure, I have been swimming in pools — clear, visible, well-demarcated lanes of civility — for nearly 40 years. But this hardly prepares one for murk, chop, tides, wind, waves, passing vegetation that wraps the feet and legs, cold spots and warm currents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Virginia Heffernan and Virginia Heffernan,New York Times News Service | September 5, 2004
After a quarter century as co-host, Barbara Walters, the alpha female of broadcast news, is leaving 20 / 20, the ABC program on which she has interviewed Fidel Castro, Christopher Reeve, Hillary Rodham Clinton and -- before 48.5 million viewers in 1999 -- Monica Lewinsky. Nearly 75, Walters has made it clear that she's not leaving television news, the form that she, as America's first female anchor, helped define. She will continue to produce a half-dozen interview specials a year for ABC, including her signature Oscar-night specials, and she'll also appear twice weekly on The View, the daytime talk show she created.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 6, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It may well be that the only reason Republican Sen. John McCain entertained Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle at his digs in Sedona, Ariz., over the weekend was to gaze at the sagebrush. But the timing and circumstances that provided the backdrop for their cozy meeting made more speculation of a McCain party switch inevitable. With Sen. Jim Jeffords' own leap to independent party status fresh in the public mind, it was only natural that the little get-together would send tongues wagging of yet another political love affair -- or at least a soft Democratic shoulder for another unrequited Republican to cry on. One or more of Mr. McCain's own political aides fanned the speculation with reports of conversations with other Democrats and McCain insiders about the chances of a third-party McCain bid for the presidency in 2004 -- if he finds himself mishandled by President Bush between now and then.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | October 16, 1993
It's sudden death overtime in the 1958 NFL Championship Game. The Colts have the ball on the New York Giants 1-yard line. A touchdown will win the game.Johnny Unitas looks at No. 35, then shakes his head. His gaze falls on this new guy in the huddle in a spotlessly clean jersey."I was gonna run 'The Horse' up the middle," the quarterback tells the befuddled player, "but now I'm throwing it to you."As anyone who knows anything about the National Football League or the Colts can tell you, this is a rewrite of sacred history.
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