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Love Affair

NEWS
June 21, 2013
I grieve for the "new normal" of Erika Brannock and for her future ("For bombing victim, a 'new normal,'" June 19). And I grieve for the future of America if our "new normal" is a government relentlessly spying on law abiding citizens. Until this country decides to overhaul our immigration and visa system, all this surveillance and "meta data" will be useless. We have a love affair with the "huddled masses" and "wretched refuse" of the world so there will be more Erika Brannocks and others whose "new normal" will also be tragic.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Here's the part where you tell me how wrong (or how right!) I was on a review. This week's bar review is about Anne Arundel County's Hellas, which has recently embraced craft beer after ten years in operation. From the review: "Before, Hella's was a restaurant that could have been (and likely was) easily taken for granted - the kind of affordable, wholesome place people go to on family outings to celebrate birthdays and winning report cards. The restaurant still needs to improve its look - which, unlike its progressive beer menu, is stale - and should give its wait staff a talking to for its apparent boredom while I was there.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
The thrust of The Sun's editorial and the approach of public officials for decades for improving Liberty Road and other secondary roads with aging retail areas has been to treat the problems as economic development issues ("Life on Liberty Road," May 23). The solutions have been to update failing areas with new buildings without dealing with the core problems. People need to be connected to their neighborhoods. Suburban Baltimore County communities were built around the love affair with the car. They became commuting communities.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I am endlessly amazed, even stultified at times, regarding how a person's wearing of a firearm gives that person a feeling of invincibility, if you will. The most recent issue deals with Baltimore Police training instructor William Kern, and his love affair with his weapon or "attachment," as prosecutors termed it ("Training instructor had 'unhealthy attachment' to gun, state says," Oct. 15). It was also noted that Mr. Kern had accidentally pulled out his weapon twice before he shot University of Maryland police recruit Raymond Gray during training exercises.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Cast members from 1993's "A Bronx Tale" will reunite with Chazz Palminteri at Chazz: A Bronx Original on Monday night for a special fundraising happy hour. "A Bronx Tale" was the movie adaptation of Palminteri's one-man stage show of the same name. Almost 20 years later, Palminteri's love affair with his native borough would in part inspire the Inner Harbor restaurant that bears his name. Guests at Monday's happy hour will meet cast members from the movie, along with other Baltimore celebrities and sports figures who are helping the restaurant launch a new charitable fundraising campaign for the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | July 11, 1994
Elvis was here.His limo idled outside in the apartment's parking lot, now filled with the bumper-stickered compact cars of techno types ("If this were an F-16, we'd be home by now"; "My other car is a jet"). He walked through the doorway with its teddy bear welcome mat, visited the bathroom with the poodle picture on the wall and seemed to appreciate the utter normalcy of it all."You've made a beautiful home here, Joyce," said the man from that monument to Southern Baroque, Graceland.Joyce Bova still lives here, in an apartment-gone-condo complex in one of those Washington suburbs that is home to so many of the busy worker bees who, mostly anonymously, keep the federal government churning along.
FEATURES
By JAMES ASHER and JAMES ASHER,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
"Cities of The Plain: A Novel," by Cormac McCarthy. Knopf. 416 pages. $25.Cormac McCarthy's work began in a best-selling way with the first book in his trilogy on life in the rural regions of New Mexico, Texas and Mexico. "Cities of the Plain," the tale of a tragic love affair between a cowboy and a Mexican girl, is the final installment of that three-volume set.There is much to like, really like, in "Cities." Even so, the book takes a little getting used to. Written largely in dialogue, the book is interspersed with a considerable quantity of talk in Spanish.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
The Faustian Bargain -- the compact where a mortal sells his soul to the devil in exchange for gaining his heart's desire in the here-and-now -- has long been the stuff of classic theater and grand opera. And our popular culture, in some of its more clever and philosophical moments, has found this theme irresistible as well. Recall Disney's "Little Mermaid," in which Ariel signs over her voice to Ursula, the diabolical sea witch, in exchange for human form. In the wickedly clever musical, "Little Shop of Horrors," Seymour the botanist plies the stage's most famous man-eating plant with human blood, the better to win money, fame and the affection of his beloved Audrey.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 16, 2006
In the future, let's hope we can leave the word "trick" out of love stories or sex comedies unless it refers to a prostitute's client. The Lake House, in which a mailbox serves as a time portal for two lovers (Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock) is the latest in a series of gimmick-ridden romances. The increasing absurdity of the trick dashes any genuine emotion as the movie goes on. At the screening I went to, the gentleman in front of me turned around to me and my friends and asked whether we'd noticed that the film ended in a way that made its opening action, even on its own terms, impossible.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2002
Annapolis artist Nancy Hammond says she gets nervous every year around this time. Tomorrow morning, Hammond plans to open her State Circle gallery doors to people who, if tradition holds, will have been lined up all night for a chance to buy one of her annual Annapolis-themed posters at a bargain. "I am filled with terror every time," said Hammond, 61. "I wonder if they're going to be there." Barring a man-made or natural disaster, a significant number of people are likely to be waiting outside the gallery by the time Hammond's staff starts serving coffee and doughnuts at 5 a.m., well before the gallery's opening.
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