Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLove Affair
IN THE NEWS

Love Affair

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | August 19, 2013
It's Friday morning, and that means the start of a workday for Ellicott City resident Matthew Lear. After waking his 15-year-old son, Sam, from his slumber, Lear eats his routine breakfast of steel-cut oats and gets dressed. The two share some quick conversation before it's time for Sam to board the school bus and Lear to hit the road. A project manager at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Lear has a 15-mile commute ahead of him. During his trip, Lear never sits in traffic.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mikita Brottman | September 29, 2014
I was close to 40 when I discovered how love really feels. The object of my affection was a French bulldog, sold to us as Oliver and rechristened Grisby. His color was officially designated "fawn piebald," which meant he had very pretty markings of light brown and white, about half of each. His fur was short and soft, and his large, expressive ears were light brown on the back, dark pink inside and could seem almost translucent in the sunlight. His mouth was wide and when he trotted along with his pink tongue hanging out, it formed a permanent smile.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
More than 1,000 letters that Vincent dePaul Gisriel Sr., a World War II B-17 Flying Fortress bombardier, and Martha Owens, whom he married in 1943, wrote to one another during World War II were stored in a box in a daughter's attic, where they remained unread for nearly 60 years. Martha died in 1977, and her beloved Vince in 2003. It was after his father's death that a son, Vincent dePaul Gisriel Jr., remembered the letters. He was seeking more knowledge about his father's wartime service flying with the 8th Air Force, based in England, on bombing runs over Germany.
NEWS
By Patti Restivo | May 5, 2014
When community theater vaudeville landed on Main Street in the Laurel Mill Playhouse's spring production of Andrew Lippa's "The Wild Party" weekend before last, it roared. Based on Joseph Moncure March's 1928 narrative poem of the same name - banned in Boston due to risqué content - "The Wild Party" debuted off-Broadway at the Manhattan Theatre Club in 2000, earning the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Music and the 1999-2000 Obie Award for Best Choreography. Produced as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2004, the operetta resurfaced to rave reviews at the Houston's Bayou City Theatrics just last year.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2001
CLOTILDE BUSCAGLIA may sometimes be forgetful, and she's not as agile as she once was. But when it comes to art, the 89-year-old Crofton woman's passion is as intense as it was when she got her first paint box more than seven decades ago. "Art," she says, "is my whole life." Buscaglia's paint box is on display, along with several of her paintings and drawings, at the Crofton branch of the county public library. Chloe Giampaolo, Buscaglia's daughter, arranged the display in celebration of her mother's 90th birthday next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Hartl and John Hartl,Seattle Times | October 21, 1994
"It's a good story, a good yarn for a movie," says Warren Beatty. "It's a little like an old standard that is a good tune."The good story is not a new story. But Mr. Beatty and his real-life wife Annette Bening give it new life in "Love Affair," their movie that opens today.Leo McCarey's "Love Affair," which starred Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer when it was first produced in 1939, has now been filmed more times than any story written by Ernest Hemingway, Edith Wharton or William Faulkner.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Resuming its politically popular offensive against lawyers, the Bush administration unveiled its controversial legal-reform legislation yesterday, appealing to Americans to end their "love affair" with litigation.The most controversial element of the plan involves civil cases. On an experimental basis, winning parties would be allowed recover legal fees from the losing side. Other recommendations would require federal courts to promote mediation and arbitration as alternatives to expensive court trials.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | September 7, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela found herself at the center of another storm yesterday, this time with the appearance of a letter in which she allegedly incriminates herself in the misuse of African National Congress funds.The lengthy letter, purportedly written by Mrs. Mandela and published in Sunday newspapers nationwide, confirmed a love affair with a young lawyer and blamed the affair for the breakup of her marriage with ANC leader Nelson Mandela.Most damaging of all, the letter seemed to confirm that Mrs. Mandela took thousands of dollars illegally from the ANC and squandered it with her purported lover, Dali Mpofu, 30. The letter is sure to further damage Mrs. Mandela's reputation and weaken her chances of a political comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 21, 1994
Certain stories are beyond messing up. "A Christmas Carol" is one such tough guy. "Cinderella," you cannot ruin a "Cinderella" with a ball peen hammer. "Beauty and the Beast"? Impervious to man or nature or Disney.And so it turns out is "Love Affair," as it is currently titled, or "An Affair to Remember" as it was titled in 1957, or even "Love Affair," as it was titled before that (in 1939). Once, it was even called "Sleepless in Seattle." Originally conceived in the late '30s by a very smart comedy structure guy, Leo McCarey (he also made "The Bells of St. Mary's" and "Going My Way" as well as a number of Laurel and Hardy short films)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | September 12, 1990
By 11 a.m., George Burns is sitting in his Hollywood office schmoozing on the phone and finishing off cigar No. 3.He's just nixed an offer to work with Bob Hope in Australia for five weeks. "Too tough," he explains. "I'm 94. I faint twice a day, sometimes three times a day."A long pause, then the gravelly, smoke-filled voice breaks into laughter. Although he lacks a stage and a large audience, the elder statesman of comedy can't help but turn a phone conversation into a jokefest.On being interviewed: "It's very nice to be 94 years old and get out of bed to be interviewed.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Carnival Cruise Lines decided to leave Baltimore last summer, saying the port had become too expensive because of environmental regulations, it was with substantial regret. The world's largest cruise line regularly filled its Carnival Pride cruise ship at the port of Baltimore with affluent first-time cruisers who found the Mid-Atlantic jumping-off point convenient. Meanwhile, Maryland saw about $50 million a year in economic value from the ship. After hearing the Pride would be heading to Florida to cut costs, state officials immediately began trying to salvage the relationship.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I am endlessly amazed, even stultified at times, regarding how a person's wearing of a firearm gives that person a feeling of invincibility, if you will. The most recent issue deals with Baltimore Police training instructor William Kern, and his love affair with his weapon or "attachment," as prosecutors termed it ("Training instructor had 'unhealthy attachment' to gun, state says," Oct. 15). It was also noted that Mr. Kern had accidentally pulled out his weapon twice before he shot University of Maryland police recruit Raymond Gray during training exercises.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | August 19, 2013
It's Friday morning, and that means the start of a workday for Ellicott City resident Matthew Lear. After waking his 15-year-old son, Sam, from his slumber, Lear eats his routine breakfast of steel-cut oats and gets dressed. The two share some quick conversation before it's time for Sam to board the school bus and Lear to hit the road. A project manager at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Lear has a 15-mile commute ahead of him. During his trip, Lear never sits in traffic.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
If it is hard to imagine buying a home, moving in, and then restoring its 67 windows to their original 1923 condition, you can only marvel at the determination of Ray and Lynn Plack to revive Hiddenbrook, their Ruxton mansion on 6 acres just north of Baltimore. "The house was untouched and belonged to one family for 89 years," said Lynn Plack, a 55-year-old real estate agent with Chase Fitzgerald & Co. Inc. "There wasn't one functioning bathroom. We had to completely gut three out of four of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
With courage and determination and more than a little bit of moxie, Adelle Waldman set out to crack the code. For her debut novel, a modern-day comedy of manners called "The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P," the Baltimore-raised author decided to explore - and expose - the thinking of the kind of guy that she and her friends used to date. Nate is a rising star on the New York literary scene, fueled by insecurity and arrogance. He's a serial dater who justifies dumping his girlfriend a few days after she'd had an abortion by reassuring himself "that he was not the kind of guy who disappeared after sleeping with a woman - and certainly not after the condom broke.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
I grieve for the "new normal" of Erika Brannock and for her future ("For bombing victim, a 'new normal,'" June 19). And I grieve for the future of America if our "new normal" is a government relentlessly spying on law abiding citizens. Until this country decides to overhaul our immigration and visa system, all this surveillance and "meta data" will be useless. We have a love affair with the "huddled masses" and "wretched refuse" of the world so there will be more Erika Brannocks and others whose "new normal" will also be tragic.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and C. Fraser Smith and Joe Nawrozki and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2001
Jeanne Blackistone Mandel, whose love affair with former Gov. Marvin Mandel sparked one of the most dramatic chapters in Maryland political history, died Saturday from heart failure at her Annapolis home. She was 64. Known her entire life as a strong-willed woman, she waged in the final years of her life a battle against Lou Gehrig's disease, a fatal neuromuscular disorder. "She fought the entire time that she was ill," said son Philip H. Dorsey III of Leonardtown. "Her doctors were amazed with the way she fought."
FEATURES
By Marion Laffey Fox | December 15, 1991
Germany is Christmas country. Travelers with a penchant for holiday folklore and collectors who hoard its distinctive crafts will find a year-round fantasia in this weathered land of brooding castles, loden-colored forests and silvery river valleys. There are museums preoccupied with it, artists inspired by it and craftsmen engaged in the wonders of it.Most of the year, remnants of Christmas past appear in degrees. On one hand, some villages seem so reluctant to douse the celebration, they always leave a few lighted trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013
Growing up in Rocky Mount, Va., Myxolydia Tyler loved watching local theater company Jack Tale Players. "I was in awe of how they told stories, and then I saw 'A Raisin in the Sun' on a high school theater trip, and that began my love affair with theater. " Tyler, 32, who now lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., has steadily appeared on the stage since then. She's currently starring in Center Stage 's production of the Broadway hit "The Mountaintop" (running since Jan. 9, the show's opening night is tonight and runs through Feb. 24)
SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 7, 2012
All the strong qualities that Art Modell brought to the Baltimore Ravens have surfaced. Modell, 87, died Thursday morning of natural causes at Johns Hopkins Hospital , and if the Ravens weren't practicing Friday, it would have been hard to tell that they have a game Monday against the Cincinnati Bengals. It's a somber but celebratory mood over at The Castle. It's sad because a giant of a man is gone, but also a time to share Modell stories. Almost everybody has one. It's one of the main reasons the Modell family and the Ravens agreed to hold a silent viewing and memorial at M & T Bank Stadium on Saturday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.