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By Lou Boulmetis hippodromehatter@aol.com | August 25, 2011
I overhead two teenage boys boasting about the many new whiskers that had sprouted on their faces during their summer vacation from school. I stopped short of chuckling out loud, though, because when I was their age I counted my whiskers, too. Although it was tempting, I also stopped short of suggesting a method that's supposed to hurry their whiskers into sprouting early. According to Mediterranean folklore, teenage boys growing up in villages throughout southern Europe rub onto their faces an ointment of olive oil, rosemary leaves and the ashes of a plant called "lad's love" ( Artemisia abrotanum )
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NEWS
Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the 2.3 acres surrounding Asbury Broadneck United Methodist Church, a subtle link to local history lies in a cemetery that dates back nearly 200 years. At least 1,800 graves - few with headstones, many belonging to former slaves - are on the grounds, each bearing a story and a key to the past. For the past 15 months, a dedicated team from the church has worked to identify each person buried there and perhaps even discover their stories. "It's important that we know who helped pave the way for us, because if this generation does not do it, I don't know what the next generation will do," said Elinor Thompson, who has led the effort.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | June 14, 2011
Ok, love might be a little strong. But if you think the place where you work is one of the best, the Sun would like to know. One of our assistant business editors is compiling a list of the top workplaces. You can nominate your employer here . Of course, given all the layoffs in recent years and the survivors having to do more for less, we probably would get a better response if we polled for the unhappiest places to work.  
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Hello. My name is Tim. And I'm an "I Love Lucy"-holic. Think less of me, if you must. It won't bother me. I have no intention of ever being cured, even if it means lifelong membership in The Friends of the Friendless (a "Lucy" reference, of course). It all started when I was a little boy (sorry, another "Lucy" reference). I discovered the greatest sitcom ever made - please, "Seinfeld" fans, do not even try - and that was that. Thanks to omnipresent reruns on Channel 5 in Washington, I would catch the show after school, after dinner, whenever.
NEWS
January 18, 2012
I enjoy reading the various editorials and commentaries published in The Sun, but I was especially moved by Dee Wright's op-ed describing the life and death of Mary Hines ("Where was Mary Hines' 'village'?" Jan. 16). Ms. Hines, an 84-year-old retired educator who was destitute and in need, was murdered. I'm left with the same questions as Ms. Wright: What did Ms. Hines' so-called friends and family do to help in her final years of heartache and pain? Not much. Talk is cheap!
NEWS
July 14, 2013
The Sun's recent front page article on the hardships facing Maryland's federal government employees on furlough included one who was making $67,000 per year ("Sequester pains hit home," July 12). I don't recall seeing front page coverage when Baltimore City employees faced furlough days, and I'm sure many of them didn't make $67,000. Vivian Vann
NEWS
April 27, 2012
Thank you, David Zurawik , for your review of VEEP ('VEEP' nails our dim-witted politics," April 22).Julia Louis-Dreyfus is certainly very good, as always, and has a wonderful #@%$ cast to @$#%^ support her. I think the #@%$y dialogue is *#$@ing wonderful. I especially like the bad language they use every &%-@^# second of the show. Well, thanks for your #@%$ time. This show is really the #@$%^ and how! Frank Fletcher, Baltimore
NEWS
April 24, 2012
The Sun's next-day coverage of college lacrosse games held on Saturday, April 21 was the usual and typical fare. Johns Hopkins University, which lost for the third time in the past four games, got the lead story on the sports section. Loyola University, ranked second in the nation in the latest coaches poll and likely to move to Number 1 with Cornell University's defeat, won decisively but got only three sentences in the far-right column half-way down page six. J. Shawn Alcarese, Towson
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | June 5, 2012
During his meeting with reporters Tuesday, Orioles manager Buck Showalter joked that he would have doughnuts waiting for Saturday's mystery starter -- a reference to first-round draft pick Kevin Gausman, who actually will be pitching for LSU this weekend in the NCAA Super Regionals. The quirky right-hander eats four mini-doughnuts in between innings during games he starts . Could that superstition fly in Baltimore? “We'll have to run that by Brady,” Showalter said, referring to club special assistant and fitness guru Brady Anderson.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
On Mother's Day, local celebrities include Baltimore Ravens, politicians and others didn't miss a chance to Tweet their love to their own mothers and all the others -- at least those following them on Twitter. Here are just a few of the messages for moms: Vonta Leach ‏ @vleach44: My mom happy mother's day. She made me the man I am today Sen. Ben Cardi n ‏ @SenatorCardin: To all the moms out there in Maryland and beyond, a happy mothers' day and a special thanks for all you do every day. - Ben Michael Oher ‏ @MichaelOher: Happy Mothers day to all the wonderful Mothers out there!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Sixty-three years ago this week - at 9 p.m. Oct. 15, 1951 - TV viewers got their first look at a situation comedy on CBS that, in short order, would become part of the country's cultural DNA. The focal point of the show was the redheaded title character, Lucy Ricardo (even in black and white, you could somehow tell the color of her hair); her Cuban-born husband, Ricky, leader of a dance band at a New York club; and their best friends, Fred and Ethel Mertz, landlords of the brownstone apartment building on the Upper East Side where they all laughed, loved, fought and schemed.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
1. In the episode "Lucy Has Her Eyes Examined?" (it will be re-created in the "I Love Lucy Live on Stage" production at the Hippodrome ), Lucy gets a dance lesson from: a)Van Johnson b)William Parker c)The Crazy Dancin' Bear d)"King Cat" Walsh 2. When Lucy tests Ricky's fidelity in "The Black Wig" episode, she and Ethel disguise themselves for a date with the guys at an Italian restaurant. How does Lucy describe the outfit hastily supplied by costumer "Mother Carol" for Ethel: a)
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Ann and Dominic Wiker loved life in their Federal Hill home. As a professional couple in their 30s, the neighborhood was ideal - they could walk to most attractions, shops and restaurants. It seemed there was always something fun going on outside their door. Then parenthood happened, and with it came the idea of moving to the suburbs. They would move, but they wouldn't leave Federal Hill. Nine years later, the Wikers - mom, dad, 9-year old Alex and 7-year old Tommy - have, to their delight, become a poster family for raising children in an urban environment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Dorothy V. Thomas, a retired city public school educator who lovingly guided students at Windsor Hills Elementary School for nearly two decades, died June 10 of respiratory failure at Summit Park Health and Rehabilitation Center in Catonsville. She was 98. "Mrs. Thomas was such a powerful and phenomenal influence on my life and all of her students. She was old-school, and her commitment went beyond the classroom," said Sidney Clifton, a former student who is now a Hollywood producer.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
For years, the Orioles were Washington's baseball team of choice. Lawyers and lobbyists would stop at the club's outlet store on Farragut Square on their lunch break and pick up tickets for games at Memorial Stadium or Camden Yards. Washington got its own club, the Nationals, in 2005. But thousands of fans never stopped following the team that was, for many, their first love. In Washington, it seems socially acceptable to be a fan of both the Nationals and Orioles - Carter Phillips is just that.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Think you're excited for some Orioles playoff action? Consider Trufflz, who may be more excited than anyone else in town. Trufflz is a 4-year-old shih tzu owned by Caryn Green, who lives in Mount Washington and works at Glarus Chocolatier in Timonium - hence the pup's name. She has an impressive collection of orange and black toys that Green collects every Halloween and is spending much of her time this week in an Orioles tutu and hair bow. “We are waiting for our Orioles to triumph in the post-season and hopefully bring that World Series trophy back to Baltimore,” says Green, who's also a life-long fan of the team.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Nacho Mama's wins the blue ribbon in Baltimore's "Michael Phelps Tweeted out love to us" sweepstakes. On Saturday afternoon, Phelps Tweeted out a photograph of the Canton restaurant's specials menu, which had this pro-Phelps message on top: Congratulations to Baltimore's own Michael Phelps! Good Job, Hon! Phelps, in his Tweet, said, "Gotta love home town love at one of # BMORE best restaurants !! O yeah # HON . " The most decorated Olympian of all time arrived back in Baltimore on Thursday (according to his own Tweets)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Mary Alice Yeskey of Charm City Cakes is one of the 100 people we asked what they love about Baltimore. Turned out a lot of people love to eat and drink. You can read them all in the July 24 Sun Magazine, or look at the online photo gallery right now. Take a look at the food, drinks and restaurants that Baltolebrities people told us they love. And find out what chefs like Cindy Wolf, John Shields and Bryan Voltaggio enjoy about Baltimore when they're not making food for everybody else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Mom-Mom and Pop-Pop listening to the Orioles on the radio on the front porch. Grandpa keeping score with pencil and paper. The yells of the fans floating over from Memorial Stadium. Chuck Thompson saying, "Ain't the beer cold. " Kids falling asleep on the ride home from the game. For many Baltimoreans, the story of the Orioles is the story of their family. It's a way for fathers and sons to talk, for mothers and daughters to connect, for grandparents to pass down traditions. Through the dark years of losing seasons, these families kept the Orioles magic alive.
NEWS
By Mikita Brottman | September 29, 2014
I was close to 40 when I discovered how love really feels. The object of my affection was a French bulldog, sold to us as Oliver and rechristened Grisby. His color was officially designated "fawn piebald," which meant he had very pretty markings of light brown and white, about half of each. His fur was short and soft, and his large, expressive ears were light brown on the back, dark pink inside and could seem almost translucent in the sunlight. His mouth was wide and when he trotted along with his pink tongue hanging out, it formed a permanent smile.
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