Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLouvre
IN THE NEWS

Louvre

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 17, 1993
If President Francois Mitterrand is judged a failure in his statist vision of France, his one great success will be the Louvre. Like predecessor Georges Pompidou (of Pompidou Center fame), he knows that the grandeur of France rests on its museums. The French president inaugurates the expansion of France's great national art museum tomorrow, its 200th birthday, officially opening its expansion into the wing of the palace previously occupied by the Finance Ministry, and into a great underground shopping mall and garage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By SUSAN SPANO and SUSAN SPANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
PARIS -- When The Da Vinci Code opens this weekend in the United States, one of the first places moviegoers will see is the Louvre, where the story starts. Director Ron Howard was allowed to film in the museum, so moviegoers will see the real thing: architect I.M. Pei's Pyramid, the 1,450-foot Grande Galerie and the Salle des Etats where Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" hangs. Since the filming there last spring, the museum has distanced itself from the movie, reflecting the French art establishment's well-known scorn for popular culture and the Louvre's weariness with the phenomenon created by The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown's controversial 2003 mystery about the supposed secret history of Christianity.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Stan Andersen | May 1, 1995
San Francisco -- U.S. PRESIDENTS leave hometown archival libraries to remember them by. But not the presidents of France -- no way! They leave big museums.The one departing the office this spring after a new French election, Francois Mitterrand, will leave the biggest museum of them all -- Le Grand Louvre. In his two terms, he got this icon of French culture converted into the world's most extensive and user-friendly art museum.Being that rare bird, a Socialist who won re-election, he's leaving not only the remade Louvre but seven other great works.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | November 30, 2005
The Beaux Arts building is a knockout, with its orange brick, slate roof and copper turrets. You'd never guess from the looks of the place that it's a sewage pumping station. But the nose knows. Nobody made a stink about smells wafting from the Eastern Avenue pumping station back in 1912, when it started doing its thing on Baltimore's grimy waterfront. But these days, the station sits amid pricey "Harbor East" housing and tourist attractions. In fact, the pumping station is a tourist attraction - home to the Baltimore Public Works Museum.
FEATURES
By Niki Hayden and Niki Hayden,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 30, 1994
The recent ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Louvre in Paris marked the highlight of I. M. Pei's career in architecture, although in the original unveiling of his design, the overwhelming response was jeers from French critics.His buildings attract controversy but, at 76, Mr. Pei can rest on his laurels. The Chinese-born, U.S.-educated architect has made his firm, Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, one of the most famous in the world.With the clinking of glasses in the background during a holiday party at his Madison Avenue office, Mr. Pei talked about his retirement, the Louvre project in Paris and his memories of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.
FEATURES
February 15, 2000
Be a 4Kids Dectective Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives/. How many career home runs did Hank Aaron hit? In what year was the Louvre Museum established? In the 1930s, what innovation led to louder guitars? (Go to www.si.edu/organiza/museums/nmah/lemel/guitars/ to find out.) LOVE THE LOUVRE Here's a pass to get you into the world's most famous art museum at www.louvre.fr/louvrea.htm. Oooo la la, it's the Louvre. And now you can wander through the galleries at your own pace without bumping elbows.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 1999
PARIS -- French workers appear to be particularly skilled in timing their strikes to have maximum impact. Last summer, as France prepared to welcome thousands of foreign soccer fans here for the World Cup finals, Air France pilots went on strike. This year, with warm weather and the start of the tourist season, the staff of government-owned museums and historic chateaux are out on strike. Last week the tourists crowding Paris found the city's main museums shut. Louvre closed The strike, which began Wednesday, shut the doors of the Louvre, the Musee d'Orsay and the Picasso Museum.
FEATURES
By Carrie Donovan and Carrie Donovan,N.Y. Times News Service | March 18, 1993
PARIS -- The sober side of fashion is surfacing with surprising force here, and not just on the runways. The Parisian avant-garde has always turned out in wraith-like black, but now young women all over Paris are wearing a "uniform" of long, narrow skirts or skinny pants accessorized with chunky, mannish shoes or equally clunky boots.Meanwhile, at the shows in the Louvre courtyard, many spectators are already sporting their versions of next fall's somber style.Katell le Bourhis, the curator of the Louvre's costume institute, usedto favor short bouffant skirts, bright colors and impressive costume jewelry.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 23, 1998
TODAY I'LL BE concluding my two-part series on Paris, France. In writing this series, my goal, as a journalist, is to provide you with enough information about this beautiful and culturally important city so that I can claim my summer vacation trip there as a tax deduction.My topic in Part II is the historic tourist attractions of Paris. The Parisians have been building historic attractions for more than 1,500 years as part of a coordinated effort to kill whatever tourists manage to escape the drivers.
FEATURES
By Blair Kamin and Blair Kamin,Chicago Tribune | January 30, 1992
CHICAGO -- The Louvre museum of Paris and Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc. announced Tuesday that the Chicago-based company will distribute a new line of art videos in the United States and Canada, including an acclaimed, behind-the-scenes look at the world-famous French institution.The target market for the videos, which carry retail prices of less than $40, are schools, colleges, public libraries, museum gift shops and videocassette recorder owners in search of a break from Grade B movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | September 3, 2000
PARIS -- At the Louvre, you could always peruse galleries of Old Master paintings. You could pause on the grand marble staircase crowned by the Winged Victory of Samothrace, or join the crowd in front of the Mona Lisa. Now, for the first time, you can also view masterworks of African art. A 15th-century bronze sculpture from the ancient kingdom of Benin, for example, or a 19th-century wooden mask of the Baga people. They are part of a new exhibition of more than 100 objects from Africa, Asia, the Americas and Oceania -- an exhibition that marks the first long-term display of what, in this bastion of Western Art, has been referred to as "primitive art."
FEATURES
February 15, 2000
Be a 4Kids Dectective Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives/. How many career home runs did Hank Aaron hit? In what year was the Louvre Museum established? In the 1930s, what innovation led to louder guitars? (Go to www.si.edu/organiza/museums/nmah/lemel/guitars/ to find out.) LOVE THE LOUVRE Here's a pass to get you into the world's most famous art museum at www.louvre.fr/louvrea.htm. Oooo la la, it's the Louvre. And now you can wander through the galleries at your own pace without bumping elbows.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 1999
PARIS -- French workers appear to be particularly skilled in timing their strikes to have maximum impact. Last summer, as France prepared to welcome thousands of foreign soccer fans here for the World Cup finals, Air France pilots went on strike. This year, with warm weather and the start of the tourist season, the staff of government-owned museums and historic chateaux are out on strike. Last week the tourists crowding Paris found the city's main museums shut. Louvre closed The strike, which began Wednesday, shut the doors of the Louvre, the Musee d'Orsay and the Picasso Museum.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 23, 1998
TODAY I'LL BE concluding my two-part series on Paris, France. In writing this series, my goal, as a journalist, is to provide you with enough information about this beautiful and culturally important city so that I can claim my summer vacation trip there as a tax deduction.My topic in Part II is the historic tourist attractions of Paris. The Parisians have been building historic attractions for more than 1,500 years as part of a coordinated effort to kill whatever tourists manage to escape the drivers.
FEATURES
By LAURIE BROOKINS and LAURIE BROOKINS,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1995
PARIS -- Emanuel Ungaro presented one of the prettiest, most seasonal shows of the week when he debuted his spring/summer collection at the Louvre.Perhaps the biggest news of the collection was that Ungaro's penchant for mixing prints was really restrained this time around. Instead, bright solids -- ranging from neon yellows, pinks and blues to muted pastels and earth tones -- dominated this showing of feminine dresses, suits and flowing, pajama-like pantsuits.Which isn't to say that Ungaro didn't make his print statement: Op-art patterns, primarily in black and white, in close-to-the body separates kicked off the show.
NEWS
By Stan Andersen | May 1, 1995
San Francisco -- U.S. PRESIDENTS leave hometown archival libraries to remember them by. But not the presidents of France -- no way! They leave big museums.The one departing the office this spring after a new French election, Francois Mitterrand, will leave the biggest museum of them all -- Le Grand Louvre. In his two terms, he got this icon of French culture converted into the world's most extensive and user-friendly art museum.Being that rare bird, a Socialist who won re-election, he's leaving not only the remade Louvre but seven other great works.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | November 30, 2005
The Beaux Arts building is a knockout, with its orange brick, slate roof and copper turrets. You'd never guess from the looks of the place that it's a sewage pumping station. But the nose knows. Nobody made a stink about smells wafting from the Eastern Avenue pumping station back in 1912, when it started doing its thing on Baltimore's grimy waterfront. But these days, the station sits amid pricey "Harbor East" housing and tourist attractions. In fact, the pumping station is a tourist attraction - home to the Baltimore Public Works Museum.
FEATURES
By LAURIE BROOKINS and LAURIE BROOKINS,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1995
PARIS -- Emanuel Ungaro presented one of the prettiest, most seasonal shows of the week when he debuted his spring/summer collection at the Louvre.Perhaps the biggest news of the collection was that Ungaro's penchant for mixing prints was really restrained this time around. Instead, bright solids -- ranging from neon yellows, pinks and blues to muted pastels and earth tones -- dominated this showing of feminine dresses, suits and flowing, pajama-like pantsuits.Which isn't to say that Ungaro didn't make his print statement: Op-art patterns, primarily in black and white, in close-to-the body separates kicked off the show.
FEATURES
By Niki Hayden and Niki Hayden,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 30, 1994
The recent ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Louvre in Paris marked the highlight of I. M. Pei's career in architecture, although in the original unveiling of his design, the overwhelming response was jeers from French critics.His buildings attract controversy but, at 76, Mr. Pei can rest on his laurels. The Chinese-born, U.S.-educated architect has made his firm, Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, one of the most famous in the world.With the clinking of glasses in the background during a holiday party at his Madison Avenue office, Mr. Pei talked about his retirement, the Louvre project in Paris and his memories of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.
NEWS
November 17, 1993
If President Francois Mitterrand is judged a failure in his statist vision of France, his one great success will be the Louvre. Like predecessor Georges Pompidou (of Pompidou Center fame), he knows that the grandeur of France rests on its museums. The French president inaugurates the expansion of France's great national art museum tomorrow, its 200th birthday, officially opening its expansion into the wing of the palace previously occupied by the Finance Ministry, and into a great underground shopping mall and garage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.