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By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | June 1, 2003
Year after year, hardly a platoon or a skirmish of the Civil War escapes detailed examination in books by buffs and scholars. Major battles and iconic personalities often merit three or four volumes a decade, as Americans remain fascinated by tragedy, heroism and romance. In contrast, the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, an event that both sowed the seeds of secession and raised the United States to a power of the first rank, chronically receives only cursory notice. Even in this bicentennial year, the pickings are limited as, alas, they were during the 100th anniversary of what one contemporary writer has called "the mother of all real estate deals."
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December 20, 2005
Almanac-- Dec. 20--1803: The Louisiana Purchase was completed as ownership was formally transferred from France to the United States. 1963: The Berlin Wall was opened for the first time to West Berliners, who were allowed one-day visits to relatives in the Eastern sector for the holidays.
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NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2003
Precisely 200 years ago today, the new American nation broke past the confines of the Mississippi River to begin its march toward continental size and world power. Unsought and unexpected, but mightily cherished, the Louisiana Territory came into U.S. possession at a fire-sale price of less than 4 cents an acre. In the words of the most beautiful of American anthems, amber waves of grain would henceforth stretch over fruited plains to reach purple mountain majesties as the young republic instantly more than doubled in size.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
Students in Monique Jackson's eighth-grade history class hardly ever sit silently taking notes while she delivers a litany of names and dates. Jackson likes to move around the room, and she likes to make her students figure things out for themselves. On Thursday, she divided a class into six groups for exercises about Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, the explorers sent out by Thomas Jefferson to explore the land of the Louisiana Purchase. "You are going to collect information on your own," Jackson told the students.
FEATURES
December 20, 2005
Almanac-- Dec. 20--1803: The Louisiana Purchase was completed as ownership was formally transferred from France to the United States. 1963: The Berlin Wall was opened for the first time to West Berliners, who were allowed one-day visits to relatives in the Eastern sector for the holidays.
NEWS
April 11, 2004
NPR's Diane Rehm to present lecture at McDaniel College National Public Radio talk-show host Diane Rehm will offer an intimate look into her childhood, marriage and career when she gives the Resnick Lecture at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in Decker Auditorium at McDaniel College. "A Conversation with Diane Rehm" is free to the public. Rehm is the host and executive producer of The Diane Rehm Show. Her radio career began in 1973 when she became assistant producer for talk shows at WAMU-FM, the NPR affiliate of American University.
NEWS
By James Bernstein and James Bernstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2003
Americans love change, but not in their pocket change. While other countries around the world in recent years have discarded small-denomination coins and replaced some paper money with new coins, the United States has resisted. Americans have failed to take dollar coins to their hearts or wallets, for that matter, and continue to let pennies pile up, even though it costs as much to make one coin as it's worth. Recently, even a move to tamper with the appearance of the nickel caused a minor uproar that prompted congressional action.
NEWS
June 22, 2003
Louisiana Purchase O'Leary Wampler, 100, whose birth in a construction tent during preparations for the 1904 World's Fair gave her the unwieldy name, died Wednesday of pneumonia-related complications. The World's Fair Baby, as she was known, was the only child of a fairgrounds construction worker, and her name came from the official title: the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. The fair was designed to mark the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase. Mrs. Wampler was born in 1902, and her christening was performed by three priests in front of hundreds at the fair's administration building.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Cowin | September 24, 1993
CRITICS of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) are so pessimistic about America's ability to compete in the world they feel threatened by a country whose entire gross national product is surpassed by America's four largest companies.General Motors, Exxon, Ford and IBM had combined sales in 1991 of about $380 billion. Mexico's total GNP: $320 billion.Much of the opposition to NAFTA comes from organized labor, especially the industrial unions. These are the rough-and-tumble guys who helped build America.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
Students in Monique Jackson's eighth-grade history class hardly ever sit silently taking notes while she delivers a litany of names and dates. Jackson likes to move around the room, and she likes to make her students figure things out for themselves. On Thursday, she divided a class into six groups for exercises about Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, the explorers sent out by Thomas Jefferson to explore the land of the Louisiana Purchase. "You are going to collect information on your own," Jackson told the students.
NEWS
April 11, 2004
NPR's Diane Rehm to present lecture at McDaniel College National Public Radio talk-show host Diane Rehm will offer an intimate look into her childhood, marriage and career when she gives the Resnick Lecture at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in Decker Auditorium at McDaniel College. "A Conversation with Diane Rehm" is free to the public. Rehm is the host and executive producer of The Diane Rehm Show. Her radio career began in 1973 when she became assistant producer for talk shows at WAMU-FM, the NPR affiliate of American University.
NEWS
June 22, 2003
Louisiana Purchase O'Leary Wampler, 100, whose birth in a construction tent during preparations for the 1904 World's Fair gave her the unwieldy name, died Wednesday of pneumonia-related complications. The World's Fair Baby, as she was known, was the only child of a fairgrounds construction worker, and her name came from the official title: the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. The fair was designed to mark the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase. Mrs. Wampler was born in 1902, and her christening was performed by three priests in front of hundreds at the fair's administration building.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | June 1, 2003
Year after year, hardly a platoon or a skirmish of the Civil War escapes detailed examination in books by buffs and scholars. Major battles and iconic personalities often merit three or four volumes a decade, as Americans remain fascinated by tragedy, heroism and romance. In contrast, the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, an event that both sowed the seeds of secession and raised the United States to a power of the first rank, chronically receives only cursory notice. Even in this bicentennial year, the pickings are limited as, alas, they were during the 100th anniversary of what one contemporary writer has called "the mother of all real estate deals."
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2003
Precisely 200 years ago today, the new American nation broke past the confines of the Mississippi River to begin its march toward continental size and world power. Unsought and unexpected, but mightily cherished, the Louisiana Territory came into U.S. possession at a fire-sale price of less than 4 cents an acre. In the words of the most beautiful of American anthems, amber waves of grain would henceforth stretch over fruited plains to reach purple mountain majesties as the young republic instantly more than doubled in size.
NEWS
By James Bernstein and James Bernstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2003
Americans love change, but not in their pocket change. While other countries around the world in recent years have discarded small-denomination coins and replaced some paper money with new coins, the United States has resisted. Americans have failed to take dollar coins to their hearts or wallets, for that matter, and continue to let pennies pile up, even though it costs as much to make one coin as it's worth. Recently, even a move to tamper with the appearance of the nickel caused a minor uproar that prompted congressional action.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
With a yellowed and snaggle-toothed skull in his hands, Professor James E. Starrs struts before his George Washington University law students like Hamlet at the grave of Yorick.He's discussing physical anthropology. But you almost expect him to declaim: "Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ..."Dr. Starrs does have a lot of the theatrical about him. He's easily one of America's most famous forensic scientists, an academic sleuth investigating historical mysteries with everything from ground-searching radar to exhumation.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
With a yellowed and snaggle-toothed skull in his hands, Professor James E. Starrs struts before his George Washington University law students like Hamlet at the grave of Yorick.He's discussing physical anthropology. But you almost expect him to declaim: "Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ..."Dr. Starrs does have a lot of the theatrical about him. He's easily one of America's most famous forensic scientists, an academic sleuth investigating historical mysteries with everything from ground-searching radar to exhumation.
FEATURES
By Carolyn Spencer Brown and Carolyn Spencer Brown,Special to The Sun | October 23, 1994
Outlaws, sunken riverboats, abandoned woolen mills and reconstructed frontier outposts are all part of Kansas City's glorified 19th-century history. During that time, the Louisiana Purchase, which ignited America's mad passion for westward expansion, and the Civil War, which pitted brother against brother in a divided state, left an indelible imprint on this landscape. In and around Kansas City, local pride in a past both celebrated and checkered lets us experience it in a way no textbook ever could.
FEATURES
By Carolyn Spencer Brown and Carolyn Spencer Brown,Special to The Sun | October 23, 1994
Outlaws, sunken riverboats, abandoned woolen mills and reconstructed frontier outposts are all part of Kansas City's glorified 19th-century history. During that time, the Louisiana Purchase, which ignited America's mad passion for westward expansion, and the Civil War, which pitted brother against brother in a divided state, left an indelible imprint on this landscape. In and around Kansas City, local pride in a past both celebrated and checkered lets us experience it in a way no textbook ever could.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Cowin | September 24, 1993
CRITICS of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) are so pessimistic about America's ability to compete in the world they feel threatened by a country whose entire gross national product is surpassed by America's four largest companies.General Motors, Exxon, Ford and IBM had combined sales in 1991 of about $380 billion. Mexico's total GNP: $320 billion.Much of the opposition to NAFTA comes from organized labor, especially the industrial unions. These are the rough-and-tumble guys who helped build America.
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