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By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
Across the country, psychiatrists and psychologists are engaged in a bruising battle. Two professions normally focused on respecting emotions and listening are instead hurling barbs, accusing each other of caring more about money and turf than patients. The issue: giving psychologists the authority to prescribe drugs. A long-smoldering debate ignited last month when Louisiana passed a law allowing psychologists there to write prescriptions. Psychiatrists - who as medical doctors can prescribe - bitterly fought the legislation and fear it will generate momentum in other states.
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NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 26, 2008
WASHINGTON - A divided Supreme Court effectively slammed the door yesterday on the prospect of expanding capital punishment in America, holding that the death penalty for violent crimes that do not end in a death is unconstitutional, regardless of the victim's age. In the 5-4 decision, the court overturned a Louisiana law that called for the death penalty for raping a child and removed from that state's death row a man convicted of the rape of his 8-year-old...
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 24, 1997
THERE'S a new law on the books in the great state of Louisiana, one that will be sure to get bleeding heart liberals weeping anew.Louisiana's law allows carjacking victims to use deadly force against their attackers. The bleeding hearts, ever mindful never to miss a chance to put in a kindly word for carjacking dirt balls, went immediately into moaning mode. The law is "a license to kill," they lamented.Then there are those of us who are only too happy Louisiana enacted the law. We don't see it as a license to kill.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
Across the country, psychiatrists and psychologists are engaged in a bruising battle. Two professions normally focused on respecting emotions and listening are instead hurling barbs, accusing each other of caring more about money and turf than patients. The issue: giving psychologists the authority to prescribe drugs. A long-smoldering debate ignited last month when Louisiana passed a law allowing psychologists there to write prescriptions. Psychiatrists - who as medical doctors can prescribe - bitterly fought the legislation and fear it will generate momentum in other states.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 26, 2008
WASHINGTON - A divided Supreme Court effectively slammed the door yesterday on the prospect of expanding capital punishment in America, holding that the death penalty for violent crimes that do not end in a death is unconstitutional, regardless of the victim's age. In the 5-4 decision, the court overturned a Louisiana law that called for the death penalty for raping a child and removed from that state's death row a man convicted of the rape of his 8-year-old...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1991
A federal judge in Louisiana ruled yesterday that he had no choice but to strike down the nation's toughest new anti-abortion law.Immediately after U.S. District Judge Adrian G. Duplantier issued his ruling, the state said it would try to get the case before the Supreme Court by this fall, to test whether the justices are ready to overrule Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 decision establishing a woman's right to abortion.In his ruling, Judge Duplantier made it clear that his own wishes were to have Roe vs. Wade cast aside.
NEWS
By Dennis Baron | September 28, 1999
A NEW Louisiana law requires children to address their teachers and other adult school employees as "ma'am" or "sir" and to use Mr., Mrs., Ms. or Miss when calling them by name.State Sen. Don Cravins, a Democrat, drafted the bill in an attempt to teach children civility and respect and to put an end to school violence.Mr. Cravins feels that similar rules of address in Louisiana prisons work wonders with unruly prisoners: "I've seen how polite and well-mannered the young inmates are."Louisiana students who do not show proper respect will be subject to punishment to be determined by local school boards.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The 10-year effort by animal rights groups to save the "Silver Spring monkeys" gained new time and opportunity from the Supreme Court yesterday.In an 8-0 ruling, the justices ordered federal courts to send back to a Louisiana court the case in which animal welfare organizations are seeking custody of the two remaining macaque monkeys still being held for federally financed medical research.That case had been transferred to federal court, which then threw it out. But the Supreme Court said that the National Institutes of Health, which now has formal custody of two of the monkeys at Tulane University in Louisiana, had no legal right to move the case out of state court.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A seemingly last-round attempt to salvage power for the states to make abortion a crime in the late stages of pregnancy failed yesterday as the Supreme Court turned aside a major case from Louisiana.By declining to hear two appeals, by Louisiana and New Orleans prosecutors, the court cleared its docket for this term of all abortion cases, leaving the issue to state legislatures and Congress for the rest of this year.In a separate, unanimous decision yesterday, the court ruled that state and local governments are free to guarantee labor peace on their public works projects by signing union-only, no-strike contracts with construction unions.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Louisiana officials, feeling political pressure at home and daring the legal odds here, decided yesterday to try to get the Supreme Court to stage a new retreat from abortion rights.Just a day after the court turned down a plea to reinstate a strict anti-abortion law in the territory of Guam criminalizing most abortions, Louisiana attorney general Richard P. Ieyoub said he would ask the court this month to revive a very similar law adopted by his state.Under the Louisiana law, abortion is a crime in all cases except to save the woman's life or in limited circumstances to end a pregnancy that resulted from rape or incest.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 24, 1997
THERE'S a new law on the books in the great state of Louisiana, one that will be sure to get bleeding heart liberals weeping anew.Louisiana's law allows carjacking victims to use deadly force against their attackers. The bleeding hearts, ever mindful never to miss a chance to put in a kindly word for carjacking dirt balls, went immediately into moaning mode. The law is "a license to kill," they lamented.Then there are those of us who are only too happy Louisiana enacted the law. We don't see it as a license to kill.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 22, 1991
Washington. -- "The issue from hell. It never goes away.'' That's the way Robin Rothrock, president of the Louisiana League of Women Voters, describes the abortion issue.The issue taints and twists election campaigns. Now it's set to dominate the fight over Clarence Thomas' nomination for the Supreme Court. No less than 600 anti-abortion bills have been introduced in legislatures since the Supreme Court in 1989 virtually invited states to pass laws challenging Roe v. Wade's abortion rights.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | April 22, 2007
Color-Blind Justice Albion Tourgee and the Quest for Racial Equality By Mark Elliott Oxford University Press / 388 pages / $30 For most of his life, Albion Tourgee persevered on "a fool's errand." An advocate of the abolition of slavery, he enlisted in the Army soon after the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter. Severely wounded, captured and released, Tourgee returned to duty as a lieutenant with the 105th Ohio Infantry. He would settle for nothing less than a "complete revolution and renovation" establishing a color-blind society, he wrote in 1863: "For this I am willing to die - for this I expect to die."
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