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Louisa May Alcott

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NEWS
By Laura Lippman | August 27, 1995
"A Long Fatal Love Chase," by Louisa May Alcott, New York: Random House, 242 pages. $21.From the first lines of Louisa May Alcott's "A Long Fatal Love Chase," the reader is in familiar territory - assuming the reader spends more time with Jackie Collins and "Melrose Place," than with the virtuous March clan from Alcott's generally adored book, "Little Women.""I tell you I cannot bear it! I shall do something desperate if this life is not changed soon. It gets worse and worse, and I often feel as if I'd gladly sell my soul to Satan for a year of freedom."
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NEWS
By Tony Glaros | May 11, 2013
They filed in the lobby of Martin's Valley Mansion in Cockeysville, some ramrod straight, others on canes and bent over walkers. They came poised to crack open fragrant memories of their days at School No. 59, more intimately known as Louisa May Alcott Elementary on Keyworth Avenue in the Park Heights section of Northwest Baltimore. The gathering on May 5 was No. 59's fifth all-school reunion since 1979 and, according to one exhausted planner, maybe the last. While high school and college reunions may be the norm, Irv Hamet said this grammar school get-together is part and parcel of the culture in the close-knit neighborhood of his childhood.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Contributing Writer | February 14, 1993
It is the dream of every collector who haunts yard sales or roadside bookstores to pull off a coup by discovering a forgotten Modigliani painting under an old framed calendar or a rare volume of a signed work by Edgar Allan Poe discarded in a box of old Popular Mechanics magazines.For Baltimorean Ron Flood, that stroke of collector's lightning struck him last Saturday at a yard sale near Westminster, when tucked among the pages of a book he bought he found two letters written by Louisa May Alcott.
NEWS
By Martin Rubin | September 30, 2007
Eden's Outcasts The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father By John Matteson W.W. Norton / 498 pages/ $29.95 It is an inevitable byproduct of the Harry Potter phenomenon that people look to the past for books that have similarly engaged young readers. At the top of most of these lists is Louisa May Alcott's Little Women (1868), which was an immediate bestseller and has certainly stood the test of time. Youthful readers still thrill to the story of the March family in mid-19th century New England; in a recent survey of books that have influenced contemporary writers, it was among those most frequently cited.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | December 16, 1990
Developer Daniel Henson originally thought he might be working up until New Year's Eve to finish construction of Alcott Place, the 44-unit apartment complex for the elderly that has been created inside the former Louisa May Alcott elementary school at Reisterstown Road and Keyworth Avenue in Lower Park Heights.To qualify for historic preservation tax credits for 1990, the $4.2 million project had to be completed and an occupancy permit had to be issued by the end of the year -- less than six months after a construction permit was granted.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
CONCORD, MASS. - As tourist attractions go, the brown, clapboard house on the road to Lexington radiates modesty. The window and door frames sag, making the whole building appear to slump. Inside, the floorboards ripple like waves in a stormy sea, and the plaster is cracked and buckled. Some of the wallpaper is rotting and torn. This is Orchard House, the setting for "Little Women," 19th-century author Louisa May Alcott's semi-autobiographical novel about young women coming of age in New England - a house that is a shrine to the novel, which has never gone out of fashion, or print, to the woman who wrote it and the flowering of American philosophical thought.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Sun Staff | June 21, 1998
CONCORD, Mass. -- The chocolate-brown clapboard house is not, I tell my daughter, just another old house with creaking floors, drafty doors, narrow hallways and musty rooms filled with worn antiques that she can admire but not touch. This house, I assure her, is not merely a shrine to a 19th-century literary figure, but a window into the life of Louisa May Alcott, one of her favorite authors.At least that's my hope. After all, Orchard House is the setting for Alcott's "Little Women," the enduring, heartwarming story of the fictional March sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, and their beloved Marmee.
FEATURES
April 12, 2006
Theater `Little Women' A musical version of Little Women, Louisa May Alcott's classic book about four sisters during the Civil War, is at the Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St., through April 23. It stars Mau reen McGovern as the sisters' mother. Show times vary, and tickets are $23.60-$73. Call 410-547-SEAT or go to ticketmaster.com or broadwayacrossamerica.com
NEWS
March 21, 1999
March is National Women's History Month, which honors the contributions of women throughout American history.Here are some reading suggestions for you and your child.Books with a twist"Tatterhood and Other Tales," edited by Ethel J. Phelps"Sammy Keyes and the Sisters of Mercy," by Wendelin Van Draanen"Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella," by Daniel San SouciGirl-powered books"Matilda," by Roald Dahl"Harriet the Spy," by Louise Fitzhugh"Mrs. Piggle Wiggle," by Betty MacDonald"The Great Gilly Hopkins," by Katherine Paterson"Sadako and the Thou- sand Paper Cranes," by Eleanor Coerr"The Courage of Sarah Noble," by Alice Dalgliesh"Shabanu: Daughter of the Wind," by Suzanne Fisher StaplesFiction"Her Stories: African American Folktales, Fairytales, and True Tales," told by Virginia Hamilton"Seven Brave Women," by Betsy Hearne"Bloomers!"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
Dorothy Seward Kratz, a retired city kindergarten teacher who taught in the same Park Heights school - and classroom - for 40 years, died in her sleep Saturday at Country Companion, a Taneytown assisted-living home. The former Randallstown resident was 94. Former pupils said Miss Kratz introduced school to generations of Northwest Baltimore children who learned their ABCs and numbers from her at the old Louisa May Alcott School No. 59 at Reisterstown Road and Keyworth Avenue. Born in Baltimore and raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1926 graduate of Western High School and earned her teaching diploma two years later at what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 24, 2006
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work Susan Cheever Simon & Schuster / 240 pages / $26 At a time when it can often seem this country has lost touch with the cultural and social idealism which once undergirded American democracy, Susan Cheever's enthralling new literary history serves to remind us of a time when unbridled intellectual excitement,...
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Early in the second act of Little Women, the heroine gets bad news. The audience begins to weep helplessly and doesn't stop for a solid half-hour. The Hippodrome Theatre begins to fill with sea-water. After 10 minutes, you could pilot a small boat down the aisles. After 20, you could drop a fishing line into the waves and catch a late dinner. Heck, even the fish are crying. Little Women 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays. Through April 23. Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. $26-$71.
FEATURES
April 12, 2006
Theater `Little Women' A musical version of Little Women, Louisa May Alcott's classic book about four sisters during the Civil War, is at the Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St., through April 23. It stars Mau reen McGovern as the sisters' mother. Show times vary, and tickets are $23.60-$73. Call 410-547-SEAT or go to ticketmaster.com or broadwayacrossamerica.com
TOPIC
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
My brother delivered the news last weekend. Five days a week, as this newspaper's night metropolitan editor, I oversee the obituaries. But it was my day off, and he spotted it first - alphabetically, at the top of the death notices. "Eva Asbell died," he told me. Maybe not my favorite teacher, but certainly my best, Miss Asbell taught me how to write, and since I'm a newspaperman, she taught me how to earn a living. I was an eighth-grader at Baltimore's Pimlico Junior High School back in 1958, and she taught English.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
Dorothy Seward Kratz, a retired city kindergarten teacher who taught in the same Park Heights school - and classroom - for 40 years, died in her sleep Saturday at Country Companion, a Taneytown assisted-living home. The former Randallstown resident was 94. Former pupils said Miss Kratz introduced school to generations of Northwest Baltimore children who learned their ABCs and numbers from her at the old Louisa May Alcott School No. 59 at Reisterstown Road and Keyworth Avenue. Born in Baltimore and raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1926 graduate of Western High School and earned her teaching diploma two years later at what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
CONCORD, MASS. - As tourist attractions go, the brown, clapboard house on the road to Lexington radiates modesty. The window and door frames sag, making the whole building appear to slump. Inside, the floorboards ripple like waves in a stormy sea, and the plaster is cracked and buckled. Some of the wallpaper is rotting and torn. This is Orchard House, the setting for "Little Women," 19th-century author Louisa May Alcott's semi-autobiographical novel about young women coming of age in New England - a house that is a shrine to the novel, which has never gone out of fashion, or print, to the woman who wrote it and the flowering of American philosophical thought.
NEWS
By Martin Rubin | September 30, 2007
Eden's Outcasts The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father By John Matteson W.W. Norton / 498 pages/ $29.95 It is an inevitable byproduct of the Harry Potter phenomenon that people look to the past for books that have similarly engaged young readers. At the top of most of these lists is Louisa May Alcott's Little Women (1868), which was an immediate bestseller and has certainly stood the test of time. Youthful readers still thrill to the story of the March family in mid-19th century New England; in a recent survey of books that have influenced contemporary writers, it was among those most frequently cited.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 24, 2006
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work Susan Cheever Simon & Schuster / 240 pages / $26 At a time when it can often seem this country has lost touch with the cultural and social idealism which once undergirded American democracy, Susan Cheever's enthralling new literary history serves to remind us of a time when unbridled intellectual excitement,...
NEWS
March 21, 1999
March is National Women's History Month, which honors the contributions of women throughout American history.Here are some reading suggestions for you and your child.Books with a twist"Tatterhood and Other Tales," edited by Ethel J. Phelps"Sammy Keyes and the Sisters of Mercy," by Wendelin Van Draanen"Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella," by Daniel San SouciGirl-powered books"Matilda," by Roald Dahl"Harriet the Spy," by Louise Fitzhugh"Mrs. Piggle Wiggle," by Betty MacDonald"The Great Gilly Hopkins," by Katherine Paterson"Sadako and the Thou- sand Paper Cranes," by Eleanor Coerr"The Courage of Sarah Noble," by Alice Dalgliesh"Shabanu: Daughter of the Wind," by Suzanne Fisher StaplesFiction"Her Stories: African American Folktales, Fairytales, and True Tales," told by Virginia Hamilton"Seven Brave Women," by Betsy Hearne"Bloomers!"
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Sun Staff | June 21, 1998
CONCORD, Mass. -- The chocolate-brown clapboard house is not, I tell my daughter, just another old house with creaking floors, drafty doors, narrow hallways and musty rooms filled with worn antiques that she can admire but not touch. This house, I assure her, is not merely a shrine to a 19th-century literary figure, but a window into the life of Louisa May Alcott, one of her favorite authors.At least that's my hope. After all, Orchard House is the setting for Alcott's "Little Women," the enduring, heartwarming story of the fictional March sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, and their beloved Marmee.
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