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By GEORGE H. CALLCOTT | January 9, 1995
Congressman Gingrich makes us think, all right. Could he possibly mean us, the Maryland Humanities Council, there on his hit list?Surely not. He is, after all, a humanist himself, making use of history. Our mission is, much like his, to mobilize history, philosophy and literature to strengthen our society.Conservative? King Louis XIV would have loved the National Endowment for the Humanities, which is the main funding source for the Maryland Humanities Council. The old monarchies believed social stability depended on cultivation of the ancient truths.
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By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 7, 2008
THERE ONCE was a man from St. Paul/Who went to a fancy dress ball./He said, `Yes, I'll risk it. I'll go as a biscuit!'/And a dog ate him up in the hall."
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By Ellen Sweets and Ellen Sweets,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 11, 1996
Want a little change from the urban pace of Paris? Try the royal palace at Versailles, just 20 miles or so down the road. It is an extraordinary study in how to develop a big piece of property to its best advantage.The town itself, as with many little French towns, would be worth the trip even if the world's most famous palace weren't there. But the palace is there, so the day trip is a super twofer.Versailles has the requisite compact charm: narrow cobblestone streets and a central core complete with an open-air market, or marche, as the French call it.Former Chicagoan Susan Concordet has lived in Paris with her French husband, Jean, for nearly two decades, and she never tires of periodic visits to the historic little city.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to the sun | April 13, 2007
When it comes to food, the culinary traditions of France and Italy are easy to distinguish: The refined elegance of classic French cuisine stands in sharp contrast to the bolder flavors of the Italian table. So, too, it is in music, particularly during the baroque era, where the contrast in culture and temperament is as different as butter and olive oil. This war of taste between French and Italian musical styles, raging heatedly in the mid-18th century during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV, will be brought to life by early music ensemble Chatham Baroque at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Smith Theatre, Howard Community College under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts.
NEWS
January 19, 1995
Highway SpeedTraffic generally flows on Maryland's highways at an average speed of 65 to 70 mph. Often I am even passed on the left by patrol cars cruising along at more than 75 mph.A couple times a month, however, the police seem to come out in droves to enforce the 55 mph limit. It can be questioned if the police timing of enforcement coincides with their monthly performance evaluations.Let's put an end to this cat-and-mouse game by raising the limit to 65 mph on Maryland's highways.Perhaps the sound logic of Parris N. Glendening's proposal to raise the limits on highways in Western Maryland will be extended throughout the state.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to the sun | April 13, 2007
When it comes to food, the culinary traditions of France and Italy are easy to distinguish: The refined elegance of classic French cuisine stands in sharp contrast to the bolder flavors of the Italian table. So, too, it is in music, particularly during the baroque era, where the contrast in culture and temperament is as different as butter and olive oil. This war of taste between French and Italian musical styles, raging heatedly in the mid-18th century during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV, will be brought to life by early music ensemble Chatham Baroque at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Smith Theatre, Howard Community College under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 17, 2001
In a courtly hall of the Walters Art Museum, the Peabody Chamber Opera explored courtly music of 1685 Thursday evening. Although the performance did not necessarily reach aristocratic levels, the results were certainly engaging. An original instrument ensemble provided a historically resonant foundation for the ambitious double-bill - Marc-Antoine Charpentier's "Les arts florissants" and Henry Purcell's "Dido and Aeneas." Charpentier's diversion about the flourishing arts is the sort of stuff a court composer produced as a matter of course - in this case, attributing just about every beautiful thing in the world to the enlightened reign of Louis XIV. Characters representing music, poetry, painting and architecture extol the king's illustrious efforts on behalf of peace and artistic richness.
FEATURES
By John Webb and John Webb,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
JACKSON, Miss. - In 1792, with King Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette herded off to Paris for a date with the guillotine, the furnishings of their opulent palace at Versailles were auctioned off and eventually scattered across the world.Now, more than 200 years after the start of the French Revolution, many of those artifacts - including three vases from the 18th-century porcelain gallery of Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery - are being reassembled here.The glitzy blockbuster exhibition "Splendors of Versailles" is billed as the largest single collection from Versailles ever to leave France.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2005
The Farmers, Tracy and his wife, Carol, love history and horses. A year ago, they entered a horse in the Preakness named Sir Shackleton, for explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, a man Tracy admired. This year, they've entered Sun King. It is a name Carol picked for their dark bay/brown colt because she was reading French history at the time and was inspired by Louis XIV. "Sun King is by Charismatic out of Clever But Costly," she said. "I thought Louis XIV, who is often called the Sun King, was perfect.
FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 27, 1996
Even with all the dancing, the good venison, the fabulous clothes and witty repartee, no one in the court of Louis XIV ever forgot who was in charge. For the king denied his courtiers the one thing they must have frequently craved:A comfortable place to sit.In late 17th-century France, the king had the only armchair. He gave side chairs only to a chosen few. Nearly everyone else stood, relishing the opulent surroundings, trying not to think about their feet.Real luxury, as Louis XIV knew, is not the same as grandeur.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2005
The Farmers, Tracy and his wife, Carol, love history and horses. A year ago, they entered a horse in the Preakness named Sir Shackleton, for explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, a man Tracy admired. This year, they've entered Sun King. It is a name Carol picked for their dark bay/brown colt because she was reading French history at the time and was inspired by Louis XIV. "Sun King is by Charismatic out of Clever But Costly," she said. "I thought Louis XIV, who is often called the Sun King, was perfect.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 17, 2001
In a courtly hall of the Walters Art Museum, the Peabody Chamber Opera explored courtly music of 1685 Thursday evening. Although the performance did not necessarily reach aristocratic levels, the results were certainly engaging. An original instrument ensemble provided a historically resonant foundation for the ambitious double-bill - Marc-Antoine Charpentier's "Les arts florissants" and Henry Purcell's "Dido and Aeneas." Charpentier's diversion about the flourishing arts is the sort of stuff a court composer produced as a matter of course - in this case, attributing just about every beautiful thing in the world to the enlightened reign of Louis XIV. Characters representing music, poetry, painting and architecture extol the king's illustrious efforts on behalf of peace and artistic richness.
FEATURES
By John Webb and John Webb,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
JACKSON, Miss. - In 1792, with King Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette herded off to Paris for a date with the guillotine, the furnishings of their opulent palace at Versailles were auctioned off and eventually scattered across the world.Now, more than 200 years after the start of the French Revolution, many of those artifacts - including three vases from the 18th-century porcelain gallery of Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery - are being reassembled here.The glitzy blockbuster exhibition "Splendors of Versailles" is billed as the largest single collection from Versailles ever to leave France.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1998
If only "The Man in the Iron Mask" were as exciting as it is glorious.Inspired by Alexandre Dumas' 1850 novel, the film couldn't have been cast better, bringing together four great, robust actors in support of one of Hollywood's hottest faces (the film proves, if proving is still necessary, that Leonardo DiCaprio is here to stay). It tells a poignant, heart-wrenching story, as the aging Three Musketeers (plus D'Artagnan) struggle to cope with advancing age and declining humanity. And it features a witty, literate script that manages to humanize its mythic figures without tarnishing their legends (although it does tarnish Dumas' story, reworking it to better reflect the feel-good '90s)
FEATURES
By KAROL V. MENZIE and KAROL V. MENZIE,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
It's strawberries in June, corn in July and oysters in September. But if it's spring, the Queen of Foods, for most people's money, is asparagus.The slender green stalk with the distinctive flavor, which starts appearing on grocery shelves and restaurant menus about this time of year, is actually a member of the lily family. Beloved by chefs, gardeners and home cooks, this versatile edible shoot can be steamed, stir-fried, blanched, sauteed or roasted, and it goes well in appetizers, salads, soups and entrees.
FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 27, 1996
Even with all the dancing, the good venison, the fabulous clothes and witty repartee, no one in the court of Louis XIV ever forgot who was in charge. For the king denied his courtiers the one thing they must have frequently craved:A comfortable place to sit.In late 17th-century France, the king had the only armchair. He gave side chairs only to a chosen few. Nearly everyone else stood, relishing the opulent surroundings, trying not to think about their feet.Real luxury, as Louis XIV knew, is not the same as grandeur.
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 7, 2008
THERE ONCE was a man from St. Paul/Who went to a fancy dress ball./He said, `Yes, I'll risk it. I'll go as a biscuit!'/And a dog ate him up in the hall."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1998
If only "The Man in the Iron Mask" were as exciting as it is glorious.Inspired by Alexandre Dumas' 1850 novel, the film couldn't have been cast better, bringing together four great, robust actors in support of one of Hollywood's hottest faces (the film proves, if proving is still necessary, that Leonardo DiCaprio is here to stay). It tells a poignant, heart-wrenching story, as the aging Three Musketeers (plus D'Artagnan) struggle to cope with advancing age and declining humanity. And it features a witty, literate script that manages to humanize its mythic figures without tarnishing their legends (although it does tarnish Dumas' story, reworking it to better reflect the feel-good '90s)
FEATURES
By Ellen Sweets and Ellen Sweets,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 11, 1996
Want a little change from the urban pace of Paris? Try the royal palace at Versailles, just 20 miles or so down the road. It is an extraordinary study in how to develop a big piece of property to its best advantage.The town itself, as with many little French towns, would be worth the trip even if the world's most famous palace weren't there. But the palace is there, so the day trip is a super twofer.Versailles has the requisite compact charm: narrow cobblestone streets and a central core complete with an open-air market, or marche, as the French call it.Former Chicagoan Susan Concordet has lived in Paris with her French husband, Jean, for nearly two decades, and she never tires of periodic visits to the historic little city.
NEWS
January 19, 1995
Highway SpeedTraffic generally flows on Maryland's highways at an average speed of 65 to 70 mph. Often I am even passed on the left by patrol cars cruising along at more than 75 mph.A couple times a month, however, the police seem to come out in droves to enforce the 55 mph limit. It can be questioned if the police timing of enforcement coincides with their monthly performance evaluations.Let's put an end to this cat-and-mouse game by raising the limit to 65 mph on Maryland's highways.Perhaps the sound logic of Parris N. Glendening's proposal to raise the limits on highways in Western Maryland will be extended throughout the state.
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